57

In your first sentence, "West Virginia University" is a proper name (proper noun phrase), while in the second sentence, the university is not specified. It is just a university (common noun) located in Virginia, and so it should not be capitalized. The likely cause for your confusion is the fact that news headlines usually don't follow conventional ...


54

The convention in English (and it may be different in other languages that use the Latin script) is that names of animals, plants and (by extension) viruses are not capitalised, unless part of the name comes from a proper noun. So we have "blue tit" or "dog rose", but "Steller's sea eagle" and "African elephant" because Africa and Steller are the names of a ...


40

As an American who learned her cursive penmanship in the early 60s, I am shocked to see cursive capitals J and G, respectively, written that way. They seem to be switched in my humble opinion ("G" for "J", and vice-versa), but just the capitals; the lower case look fine. Is it possible they write these differently in the UK? I would tend to doubt it. My ...


32

It is not a mistake. Many countries have a political party called the Labour Party. (Or Labor Party, in some countries.) So it has a capital L because it is a name. The agriculture minister is a member of parliament belonging to the political party that holds the majority and is in government - from context that is not the Labour Party: most likely the ...


28

Yes, in standard written English, we always capitalize I. From a Wikipedia page, I (and only this form of the pronoun) is the only pronoun that is always capitalized. The practice became established in the late 15th century, though lowercase 'i' was sometimes found as late as the 17th century. Additional information (to the question "Why are other ...


27

No. Google as a verb should not be capitalized. Because if you put 'G' capital, you mean the word 'Google' as a company (proper noun). You cannot company something. I found this on Wikipedia. It's useful. The first recorded usage of google used as a participle, thus supposing an intransitive verb, was on July 8, 1998, by Google co-founder Larry Page himself,...


24

As a Brit, I agree with the previous answer, that the capital letters are the wrong way round. Here is an example picture which looks correct for all letters to me: It's worth mentioning that, although technically correct, I tend to use roman capitals (as mentioned by @JamesK) to avoid any confusion.


19

It is written ['coronavirus' with no space and no capitalized 'c'][1]. I'm not sure about it. It is the name of virus which makes it a proper noun. No, that's not the name of the virus. The name of the virus is SARS-CoV-2, and the name of the disease that the virus causes is COVID-19. The word "coronavirus", on the other hand, is just a common noun. There ...


18

The rule for formal letters is that only the first word should be capitalized (i.e. "Best regards"). Emails are less formal, so some of the rules are relaxed. That's why you're seeing variants from other native English speakers. It would never be wrong, however, to continue using "Best regards" for emails. Best regards, godel9


14

It is a T-shirt because its shape reminds of a capital letter T, in the same way an A-frame's shape reminds of a capital letter A. While it is more correct to say the shape reminds of a capital letter T, than a lowercase t, t-shirt would be equally understood.


13

As for the capitalization, coronavirus(es) is (are) actually more of a category than a single specific thing. But at any rate, we do not capitalise cold, influenza, or measles either. I'm not a biologist any more than I'm a linguist, so I apologise if this analogy is clunky - but I don't think of them as proper nouns, they are more like cat and mouse than ...


12

No, disease names are not proper nouns, although diseases named after people keep the capitalization of the person's name (M√ľnchausen syndrome). The scientific (Latin) names of disease-causing organisms follow the standard rule of Genus species. If you've seen "Celiac Disease", it's just because of an unfortunate tendency some People have to capitalize ...


12

No, you do not capitalize the first letter after the beginning of the sentence... BUT You should not start a sentence with a numeral. You should either rewrite the sentence or write the number out fully: Forty-five percent of the work was implemented.


12

In the Palmer Method (1888) the G has the form shown next to the J above. You can see that the G is just a big version of the g, with a hugely exaggerated back-and-forth motion for the tail. The Palmer Method emphasized muscle motion, and the exaggerated stroke led to more movement of the arm as well as giving the letter a more distinctive shape.


11

They're not capitalized because they're not proper nouns. A proper noun is one that is used to refer to a unique entity; "arginine" is used to refer to any sample of that particular chemical. It's no more a proper noun than "water".


10

No, the dash represents a pause in the sentence, which continues after the dash. Since the sentence did not end you do not capitalize "yes". For a detailed list of capitalization and other style rules you can reference this Oxford Style Guide PDF.


10

In advertising, capitalization is often used for emphasis, to attract people's attention (which is the primary goal of advertising). It would not be unreasonable to interpret it as shouting, since advertisers frequently shout things that make whatever they are promoting sound better. On television and radio, they often shout the entire ad (which I find ...


10

Collocations of the form division-name + number—Volume II, Book 2, Chapter Four, Section 3, Illustration C—are capitalized because they are taken to be names of the entities they refer to, as may be seen from the fact that (just like personal names) they take determiners only when modified by preposed adnominals. okWe find in Chapter Four ...


9

Nordic isn't used a noun in a phrase like "Nordic skiing", it's an adjective. One might call it a proper adjective and it's always capitalised. OED has Nordic [sic] adj. 1. Of or relating to Scandinavia, the Scandinavian people, or their languages. Adjectives which are derived from proper nouns always retain their capitalisation, which is why ...


9

You are right: Meadow Hall is the proper name of a house or mansion described in the book, and that is why the words are capitalized. Note also that there is no article before "Meadow Hall": we don't usually use articles with proper nouns. We do have the definite article the before "scullery window", which somewhat attests to the fact that these words are ...


8

I have done some online research tonight, and found out that while many other formerly proper nouns such as Internet, and E-mail have transformed into common nouns, the powers-that-be have mostly resisted a similar transformation of T-shirt because the capital letter T shows the approximate shape of the item of clothing. Other words like this are A-frame, C-...


8

Both capital and lowercase letters can be appropriate at the beginning of such lists. Different style guides are likely to offer different opinions about when to use capitals and when to use lowercase letters. As a rule of thumb, though, capital letters are more appropriate if each of the list items forms a complete sentence. In your example, the list items ...


7

You can give a photograph whatever title you want. Nobody would think twice about a photograph with or without the word "the" in the beginning. As far as capitalization goes, the standard would be to capitalize the first letter of all words except for conjunctions, articles, and prepositions. If the first word of the title is a conjuction, article, or ...


7

No. The rules for capitalization are fairly straight-forward. You capitalize: The first letter of a sentence or direct quotation (Today is a new day. John said "Today is a new day"). The pronoun 'I' Single letters in music (Bach's Fugue in D minor) Each word in a proper noun - including names of months, days, people, organisations, cities, holidays and ...


7

Is this regarded as valid English according to a certain style ...? Surnames in all-capitals is a common style used in genealogical databases and in genealogical discussions. For example, a Recording Names lesson at genealogy.about.com says 2. Print SURNAMES in upper case letters. This provides easy scanning on pedigree charts and family group sheets ...


7

it's not a matter of grammar, but of style. capitalized words stand out because of CONTRAST. if i decided to write in all-lowercase, even though it wouldn't be stylistically appropriate for a formal paper, it still wouldn't be ungrammatical. arguably, some sentences become ungrammatical with incorrect capitalization. this is usually because of word pairs ...


7

Ok, following your comments about "outlook resources inc" being the name of the company, clears this up a little. In the USA this would more conventionally be written "Outlook Resources, Inc" - capitalizing the first letter of each word, and a comma between the name and the fact that it is "Incorporated". The fact that it was not written like this made it ...


7

Is this correct to use a comma in this situation (for animals and their owners, I have learned...)? Does it make sense to use surprising in this sentence? ("It seemed surprising to me that beside of famous and notorious toxins...") Shouldn't water start with a capital letter? ("...many essential elements and substances like Calcium, Sodium and even ...


7

The word "abelian" is not traditionally capitalized in mathematics, perhaps because it has been generalized to absurdity from where it started. But generally, things named after people in the sciences are capitalized (see J.R.s answer for other exceptions). Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abelian_group#A_note_on_the_typography


7

At the beginning of a sentence, capitalize the first letter: E.g., a sentence like this one. Inside a sentence, both letters go in lower case: Both letters go in lower case, i.e., neither is capitalized. Capitalization for Latin abbreviations works the same as if you were to spell out the words (which no one ever does). They're not acronyms. The second ...


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