7

In the first case it's a part of a place name. A good example of this is "South Korea". In the second case "the south side" is not a part of the place name of "Baltimore". From editorsmanual.com: Don't capitalize names of directions like north, south, east, and west when used to refer to direction and location, but do ...


6

Every SI unit uses lower case and loads of them are named after people. It's actually a deliberate style choice made by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures. See the answers to this post on the english language stack exchange.


6

When the name of a product is derived from a particular place, the place name is a proper noun, so the first letter is capitalised, for example Bordeaux wine. When the name of a product is derived from the main ingredient, then unless the main ingredient is a proper noun, the first letter of the ingredient name is not capitalised, for example barley wine. ...


5

No, "working days" (etc) is a common phrase and does not need to be capitalized. Legal contracts are funny things and have their own rules a lot of the time. In the text you quoted, "Documentation" and "Contractor" are not usually proper nouns and would not usually be capitalized, but they are in this document because they were ...


4

You may have noticed that May is the name of a month and a girl's name, but it is also a verb, a modal verb to be precise. Capitalising proper nouns avoids possible ambiguity or confusion. Compare "rolling stones" and the "Rolling Stones", the first is an activity the latter is the name of a well-known rock band. In the 17th and 18th ...


4

When the term "district" is used as a description it is not a proper name and is not capitalized. Usages such as "the business district", "the industrial district", "the financial district", or "the historic district" are descriptions and do not get capital letters. Phrases such as "the Lake District&...


4

It is a feature of English orthography. English wasn't designed, it evolved. 1500 years ago there were no lower case letters, only capitals. Scribes developed the lowercase as a quicker forms of writing, but "important" words were still written with capitals. When English was first written these rules which had applied to Latin were adapted to ...


4

It is normal to capitalise nouns of relationship, such as mother, father, aunt, etc, and their shortened versions (mum/mom, dad, etc) when they are used as forms of address or as a name e.g. hello, Dad! Dear Mom and Dad (starting a letter), I thought Aunt Sally would come to the party, but not otherwise - did you tell your dad? Is Mrs Jones your aunt? Does ...


3

Each of your example forms 1-4 would be acceptable, and so would other variations. I would use a colon on your numbers 1 and 4. I would use semi-colons on numbers 1 and 2, and probably start each item with a capital in 2. There are also forms in which each list item contains multiple sentences, this is most often done as something like your number 3.


3

It's not an adjective here, it's a noun, and it should be capitalized. Names of languages are treated like proper nouns in English.


3

There's no hard and fast 'rule', but professional organisations that produce literature tend to have 'style-guides' (or refer to a respected one) so as to have consistency of output among writers. Several style-guides, including The Chicago Manual of Style, the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, and the MLA Handbook from the Modern ...


2

There is no difference, it is the same word in broadly the same context. Words in a title, such as a book title, are usually capitalised. There are no strict rules about this, but most 'style-guides' (manuals produced for professional writers and academics to ensure uniformity) say you should capitalise the first and last words of any title, and any other ...


2

Yes, this is normal practice, unless, and sometimes even if, there is some other Act being referred to in the same context. For brevity, particularly where has a long name, repeated references are normally shortened as much as possible, both in writing and in speech. In very formal prose, it is normal practice to do this abbreviation only after explicitly ...


2

Both are possible. In the particular case, I can find that the name of that particular building is "Pikesville Branch Library" As that is the name of the institution, it is a proper noun and is capitalised. It would be very reasonable to refer to this as "Pikesville Library" as a shortened form of the name. But you can also use the ...


2

You would expect a title to be capitalised when it is unique and you are naming that unique role. In your example, you used 'district attorney' with the definite article, 'the', making it unique. There may be many district attorneys, but in any specific area there will perhaps be just one, making it unique in that context. For example: He works as a ...


2

Proper nouns are capitalised, but "sky" is not a proper noun. Proper nouns name specific people, places, objects or concepts. And so for every proper noun, there should be a generic noun (or nouns) that name the type of that noun: John is a man. Paris is a city. Wednesday is a day of the week. But can you do that with sky? Sky is a ....? ...


2

You should capitalise the word "God" when it is being used like the name of the supreme being. So certainly capitalise "Thank God" and "I swear to God" even if these expressions are not meant as genuine prayers or oaths. Also "Oh my God", although this is such a casual expression, you will see "Oh my god" ...


2

In general, disease names are not capitalized in English - words such as diabetes, cholera or mumps are common nouns. The disease names that are capitalized are ones that are initialisms or acronyms (AIDS, COVID-19, etc.), or ones that derive their names from proper nouns, such as names or regions (Ebola, Alzheimer('s) disease).


2

If you consider "Room 501" it to be the name of the room then capitalise it. If you consider the word "room" to be a common noun, and 501 to be its name then you wouldn't capitalise it. So you can express a subtle difference in meaning by the use of capital letters. If 501 means that it is the five hundredth and first room in some ...


2

The truth is there are actually many different ways to write cursive letters with none really being more correct than the other. That being said, one of the most common styles used is D'Nealian cursive which is a cursive taught in elementary schools in the US when kids are first learning to write cursive letters. Here is a G: videos and worksheet Here is a ...


2

These are not being used as titles. They are being used as common nouns and are not capitalised. "As a title" means as part of a name: Please give this to your uncle. Please give this to Uncle George. Or in place of a name Please give this to Dad (said by one sibling to another) Note you don't say "Father George" or "Brother ...


2

If the directional word is part of the proper name of a place, then it must be capitalized. If the directional word merely refers to one portion of a named place, then it shouldn't be capitalized. Southern California is the proper name of a defined geographical and cultural area, so "southern" must be capitalized. In contrast, "southern ...


1

The gas used until about 50 years ago in my country (the UK) for heating and cooking, made from coal, was called in writing 'coal gas' (both words all lower case). Use of a capital C would be incorrect. By-products from the production process included coal tars and ammonia, which were important chemical feedstock for the dye and chemical industry with a ...


1

It should be lower case. The article "a" means it's not a unique thing, but one of several or many, so the words "congressional district" are not part of a proper name.


1

"District" here refers to the District of Columbia which is a proper noun and therefore must be capitalized. You can see this usage in other place names, for example "the City" referring to New York City or the City of London. "The district" referring to a general area would be an improper noun and would not be capitalized.


1

No, language should not be capitalized. The word English in English language is a proper adjective, formed from the proper noun England and it is capitalized,but language is not a proper noun. If there is a National Museum and that is its full proper name, then that should be capitalized.


1

The legal convention in the US is to capitalize 'Supreme Court': in legal documents when: 1. When you’re referring to the United States Supreme Court. 2. When stating a court’s full name: the Michigan Supreme Court. When should you capitalise 'Court'?


1

Q. Hi, chief. How are you doing? -- I just talked to the chief. Should chief be capitalized In the first example I would say not necessarily. The word "chief" is often used in a slang context where the person you are referring to is not officially titled by the word Chief. Boss, chief etc. are often used as a form of respect albeit in some cases ...


1

There's no reason to put anyone's proper name in all caps. To do so would be to make it improper. The only thing that I've seen that gives a clear explanation is "CAPITIS DIMINUTIO". Outside of acronyms, corporations, joking around or text talk, I've seen no other valid explanation. "In Roman law, A diminishing or abridgment of personality. ...


1

The phrase 'artificial intelligence', abbreviated as AI, is a branch of study or research. It is, therefore, a common noun. Therefore you would not usually capitalise it according to English rules. Now, if 'Artificial Intelligence' is the name of a device, software, hardware, app, website, etc. which would help people to determine symptoms of cholera and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible