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55

You are correct: me is the object pronoun and should be used here, since it is going in the object position. Normally you would probably say "keep us updated", so "keep him and me updated" may feel a bit off even though it's perfectly correct. As to the people who tell you that you should always use "I" in conjunction with a name: they are WRONG, WRONG, ...


54

What's happening in these sentences is that you are starting with an original idea like this: I have never met a man who is as rich as he is rich. That sentence sounds strange because we haven't applied any ellipsis- the process of pruning unnecessary or repeated items from a sentence. The minimum ellipsis for a natural sentence is to remove the repeated ...


33

I think it's still simpler than any of the other answers yet. Just remove the other party and determine which version of 'I'/'Me' work for the sentence. I went to the store. Sue made a cake for me. Then, add the other party back into the sentence, putting the other party first: Tom & I went to the store. Sue made a cake for my friend &...


23

In formal and scholastic registers, "he" is appropriate.  It is part of the subject of the subordinate clause.  The alternatives presented here are that Lily had planned the party and that he had planned the party.  The complete subject of the clause is "Lily [and] not he", which excludes the latter alternative.  That being said, ...


18

"I" is correct. The speaker is the subject of the sentence, the one performing the action, and so you use the subject version of the pronoun. You use "me" when the speaker is the object, the person being acted on. Like, "Bob asked me to go fishing." Normally in English when there are several people mentioned in a sentence, one of whom is the speaker, you ...


15

The rules governing adjective order can seem technical and even esoteric, but there's a simple rule that is not in dispute: the determiner comes first. A determiner is strictly speaking not an adjective, but can look sufficiently like one that it is included in the "Royal Order of Adjectives": The nine categories—in order from those farthest from the ...


14

All three are OK, some purists will argue that the second is formally correct I've never met a man as rich as he The use of the personal pronoun ‘he’ sounds more refined to some ears, more "British" and therefore more correct. The majority of native speakers will use the object pronoun, and say I've never met a man as rich as him. Tagging the ...


13

The simplest method for determining the "correct" pronoun is to remove the other person from the sentence entirely. Conjugate the verb as if it only involves you & try the different options. Whichever pronoun is correct should work for the sentence w/multiple people. Attempt #1: ME Me am thinking about founding an internet company. No. Sounds like ...


12

In short, yes. The following exchange would be correct. Teacher walks into a classroom full of students and there are drawings on the board Teacher: Did you guys do this? Students: It wasn't us (who did that)! The "who did that" part there is in parenthesis because in regular speech, nobody would say that. It is correct, but in regular speech, that ...


9

Native speakers have been arguing about this for centuries. There are two schools of thought. The conjunction theory The conjunction theory, most famously advocated by Robert Lowth (1710–1787), claims that than is a conjunction that introduces a new clause with its own subject. So, you say: He can walk faster than I can walk. For brevity, you can omit ...


9

The answer your book doesn't want In English, as in many languages, nouns change form: rat   (singular) rats (plural) This is called inflection. In the example above, rat has two forms. These forms reflect grammatical number (singular and plural), so we can say nouns inflect for number. But some words inflect for other purposes. In English, for ...


9

Given the clause (what was explained): Lily, not him, had planned the party. both Lily and "him" are subjects. So use the subjective pronoun form, he is correct: He explained that Lily, not he, had planned the party. But in informal speech, people often say it either way, often depending on what seems to sound best.


8

Your understanding is correct. The reason that people often say things like "keep Tom and I updated" is a bit convoluted. I see Hellion has put an answer up while I'm writing this, and what he says is correct. Colloquial AmE often substitutes me for I in the subject of the sentence when there is more than one person involved (e. g. "Me and Tom went to ...


8

Your thinking is right up until step 4. The usual principle is that the case of a relative pronoun reflects its role in the subordinate clause, not the main clause. Of course, since that has the same form whether it's nominative or accusative, it's something of a moot point. However, you can see the principle at work in the fading but not yet completely ...


7

Nobody but him was present. Nobody but he was present. Which usage is correct? This question comes up a lot. In short, the answer is that in general both versions are acceptable. Though for some speakers, there might be some style differences between them, where the nominative "he" version might be considered to be rather formal in style. ...


7

"Between you and me" is historically correct, but many native English speakers -- perhaps especially my fellow Americans -- do not know this. I suspect that the confusion comes from the fact that "you" and "you" are indistinguishable, so people get used to "You and I" as a subject and then use "you and I" as an object. This is not helped by the fact that ...


7

The subject of the sentence is "it", and so the main verb has to be "wasn't" not "weren't". Yes, it wasn't us is correct.


6

While all the other answers seem to focus on why it's than I or than me, I don't think this helps most people in everyday life such as in a conversation—they seem a little difficult to be used on the fly. In a sentence, some words are often omitted, and the trick is not to do that. Just make the sentence as long as possible, and you'll see it's actually ...


6

Yes, it is. But many people nowadays don't use whom at all, and would say (and write): Who was this street named after? Anyone who claims that this is not grammatical is living in an earlier century.


6

Always split the sentence in such dilemma. Make those two people in concern separate and check what works! You will go to London + Me I will go to London. SO, You and I will go to London. She'll meet you + She will meet I me. SO, She'll meet you and me. Take your sentence: Both you and he are happy = You are happy + He is happy ~ Yes! Both ...


6

Both "he" and "him" are awkward. This sentence falls into a broad class of sentences in which a pronoun is used as part of a subject, but isn't the whole subject. The most well known example of this type of sentence is: John and me planned the party. or John and I planned the party. Both may be considered correct, as both are used commonly by ...


6

Native speakers often say He looks more depressed than her. but the objective-case her is considered [has long been considered] to be sub-standard. The standard version is He looks more depressed than she does. where "she does" means "she looks depressed". He looks more depressed than she [looks depressed]. What is being compared is "he looks ...


6

He looks more depressed than her/she but I don't know the reason. In constructions like this, both forms of the pronoun are possible depending on its function in the clause, i.e. whether it is an immediate complement of a preposition or the subject of a reduced clause. If it is understood as the complement of the preposition than, it is accusative her. ...


5

The system is subject but then the next clause talks about pedestrians who also become subject crossing the regions etc. Removing the pronoun itself will also work. A quick trick! Now, cut off the sentence. Pedestrians whom are crossing [something] Here only, we get a hint that it seems incorrect. Now, think that it's about 'you'. If 'I' fits, put '...


5

She perhaps has in mind conditional sentences like If I wanted some help, I’d ask for it, where the verb in the if-clause is in the past tense.


5

In natural speech, me and X is common: ! Me and Bob are thinking about founding an internet company. ! Bob and me are thinking about founding an internet company. The reverse order, X and me, is also found, but not as often. However! In schools, students are taught not to speak this way, and even though it's natural, it's considered non-standard ...


5

The whole matter of pronoun case is complicated, because over the last 400 years the English language has been drifting away from the 'classical' use of case, and the spoken language has drifted farther than the formal written language. But in your example there is no conflict between the two. Although it can be inferred from what you say that he was in ...


5

John and I drove to the beach in his car. Jane came with John and me on our trip to the beach.


5

The "as ... as" construction is often used when you are comparing two people, things, or situations: John is as rich as Jack. An old woman with hair as white as snow. Sometimes the second thing is not an explicit noun like: Trump is as rich as he says. In your case, the best formal one is the third sentence, "...is as rich as he is". The ...


5

As the accepted answer to the question on EL&U that @Lucian Sava linked indicates, both are now correct, because both are widely acceptable to English speakers. Unlike French which has the Académie française, there is no single authority that determines what is or isn't correct English. Respected dictionaries (such as the OED) are close, but even they ...


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