New answers tagged

1

If someone uses '... wrote last night ...' in a sentence, then the sentence indicates the time that it was written. If they meant that something else happened last night, they need to construct the sentence differently. It isn't ambiguous.


1

[1] Give me blood and I will give you freedom. [2] Be industrious and you will succeed in life. Constructions like these do not have the form or literal meaning of conditionals, but they serve indirectly to convey a conditional meaning. The first clause in each example is not an adjunct (your adverbial), but a main clause and thus these are compound ...


0

I agree that this looks like an inconsistency. No matter how you want to classify the sentences, they have the same grammatical structure. Imperative clauses: Give me blood. Be industrious. Independent clauses: I will give you freedom. You will succeed in life. You can assume that the first clauses are implied conditionals, and therefore subordinate, but ...


0

In my American English dialect that would not be acceptable, except as a joke between people who also speak French. "It's not that I don't want to..." is perfectly acceptable. Alternate possibilities: "I don't want to..." use this if you are starting the conversation. "I don't want to go out for lunch, I am on a budget." "...


Top 50 recent answers are included