3

The words "loneliness" and "worthlessness" are pretty much always emotions or mental states, so they are appropriate objects for "feelings of". The word "solitude" on the othe hand, most often means the actual fact of being alone. However it can also be used to describe the metal state resulting from being alone, and in that sense could be used with "...


3

To commute is usually used to mean the action of going to and from work every day, with an implication that it is an appreciable distance, and that some form of transport is involved, such as car or train. "Do you live nearby?", "No, I have to commute." However, you certainly can override the implications: "I'm so lucky, commuting only takes 90 seconds as ...


2

These suggestions are all reasonable. "Jet-lag" is rather like a disease, and the sort of language that you could use with an illness (like "the 'flu") also works for jet-lag. He has jet-lag He is suffering from jet-lag He started to experience the symptoms of jet-lag... There is a useful adjective form "He is jet-lagged"


2

Even though "to edge" means to move slowly, you can use "slowly" to emphasise that movement. In this case, it helps to emphasise that additional care is to be taken when moving the car onto the road. It is similar to saying that "the athlete ran" vs "the athlete ran quickly". It emphasises the existing verb, and lets the writer be more descriptive.


2

In the strict context of your example (and clarifications), you could simply use patients. This doesn't mean "going to hospital as a patient" - which has been answered by the others, but works as an alternative. 20% of more than 350 million patients prefer tertiary referral hospitals.


2

It's not innately ungrammatical, but it doesn't convey the meaning you want to convey. To convey that meaning, I would change "comfortable" to "comforting," i.e.: "The food is comforting."


2

Volunteer can be an adjective meaning "being or engaged by volunteers". So calling someone a "volunteer student" is correct. "Student volunteer" is also correct. Idiomatically, it depends on which status came first for how you order them. If they were a volunteer for some service and then became a student, you could call them a "volunteer student". If ...


2

This is the case of proper adverb placement. Most adverbs can be classified into 10 different types. See the types here in Cambridge: Types of adverbs and their positions. Different types of adverbs go in different places [there are exceptions though]. "Carefully" is an adverb of the type manner (how something is done). Adverbs of manner can be placed in ...


2

Commuting means "travelling to and from a particular place. Usually traveling to and from work". It usually is used to talk about travelling by car, bus or train to work. It could be used to mean walking to work, but if you can walk to work, the distance can't be so great, and you might not consider it to be "travelling" or "commuting". Nevertheless, some ...


1

presidential election = the election of a president. The Orange Man will be one of the candidates for president in these elections or in this presidential election. US presidents are elected in voting that takes place every four years in November. There are others who are also elected at this time: Congresspeople and senators. In that sense, they are ...


1

These are all idiomatic expressions that centre around a more basic definition of "come in" which means to enter, or join something. To come into a person's possession means that something which once did not belong to the person has now become their possession. It is like the item has joined a group, the person's existing possessions. To come into [a ...


1

Either could be OK. "Consists of" implies that the resume is a complete list of your total experience, while "includes" implies that this is a selected list. A person seeking an entry level or junior position would probably be giving a complete list, and use "consists of", while a person with 30 years of experience in 20 different jobs will probably give ...


1

Comfortable, when it describes objects or places, tends to refer to physical comfort (softness, temperature, ergonomics), and this sense may be jarring when applied to food. I will quote most of the Merriam-Webster Dictionary entry for comfortable (adj.): 1a : affording or enjoying contentment and security // a comfortable income b : affording or ...


1

I'm not a native speaker of English, but I'd stick to the expression have a snowball fight. There's no need to force something new, especially as a non-native speaker, when the existing expression occurs 25 times more frequently according to the Google Ngram Viewer. Throwing snowballs sounds perfectly fine as well, but is more evocative of the action of ...


1

As an alternative to admit I suggest the verb treat. Lexico has this: VERB 2 Give medical care or attention to; try to heal or cure. the two were treated for cuts and bruises The sentence becomes 20% of more than 350 million people treated by hospitals prefer tertiary referral hospitals. People who go to a hospital are not necessarily treated, ...


1

Because it's not a proper noun, your "open space" likely needs a definite or indefinite article. If the audience of your message understands that there is one specific open space to which you are referring, use the definite article ("the open space"); otherwise, use an indefinite article ("an open space"). As to which preposition to use, you would generally ...


1

A Google search currently gives me 184 results---it can be found, but it isn't common. It's more common to collocate two terms that are grammatically similar to each other, such as: Life in the past and present London yesterday and today (implies a broad meaning of 'yesterday' that can cover past decades) London then and now


1

No, I don't believe apply would be correct usage. Could you be thinking of "administer"? Tomorrow I'm going to administer an exam.


1

No, they do not all mean the same thing. "At all costs" means that you will do anything to achieve your stated purpose or goal. Literally, you would pay any price to achieve it. The most idiomatic ways of expressing your example would be: They must be destroyed at all costs. or: I will destroy them, no matter the cost. "No matter what happens" ...


1

"Exercise keeps me in good shape." would be understood by any native English speaker to mean that you exercise to keep your body fit.


1

I wouldn't use the term prior notice for that, personally, because that feels to me like something that you would use to describe the publishing process - where the translator turned in their work and it had sections missing. Covert and overt are absolutely appropriate here.


1

"Being a help" isn't really correct at all, so you can disregard that option. What I think you're having trouble with is the difference between being of help VS being (any, much, little) help. the former can be used by itself (e.g. "is there any way I could be of help?"), while the latter needs a describing word between be and help, such as: "was he any ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible