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35 votes

'Rescuers had to wade waist-deep in floodwater.' Why not 'Rescuers had to wade in waist-deep floodwater.'?

To wade waist-deep ("Somebody waded waist-deep in water ...") refers to the wader wading in water up to their waist, whereas waist-deep water refers to the depth of the water using the ...
TimR on some device's user avatar
29 votes
Accepted

'Rescuers had to wade waist-deep in floodwater.' Why not 'Rescuers had to wade in waist-deep floodwater.'?

The dictionary is explaining an idiomatic phrase of the word "wade". That is you can adverbially modify "wade" with an expression "knee-deep". You can do this without ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
15 votes

'Rescuers had to wade waist-deep in floodwater.' Why not 'Rescuers had to wade in waist-deep floodwater.'?

Rescuers had to wade in waist-deep floodwater is perfectly acceptable English. It tells us that there was water about three feet deep where the rescuers had to go. There is a very slight difference in ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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14 votes

'Rescuers had to wade waist-deep in floodwater.' Why not 'Rescuers had to wade in waist-deep floodwater.'?

The meanings of those two sentences are largely the same, but there's a slight difference: these two sentences say different things about how deep the water could be. waist-deep in floodwater The ...
Michael W.'s user avatar
12 votes

Make or Do sushi?

Make and do mean different things in the context of That place makes / does great sushi. Specifically... If they make sushi, that definitely means they prepare sushi. They probably also sell the ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
10 votes

Why "previously learned knowledge" is a natural phrase in English, although "learn knowledge" is not?

The phrase "learned knowledge" is a red herring here: the focus should be on the whole phrase "previously learned knowledge and skills". The sentence could use the word "...
minnmass's user avatar
  • 605
8 votes
Accepted

Why "previously learned knowledge" is a natural phrase in English, although "learn knowledge" is not?

As you say, it's redundant to use the noun "knowledge" as the object of the verb "learn", so English speakers tend to avoid that collocation. I'd therefore argue that the example ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
6 votes

aggravate/exacerbate/heighten those disadvantages

Personally, I'd prefer exacerbate in the cited context, but as this definition clearly indicates, aggravate is a perfectly reasonable alternative... exacerbate to increase the severity, bitterness, ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Why is the question tag for this sentence in Cambridge Dictionary shown like this? --- He gave up his job, did he?

One of the funny things about these kinds of questions is you can often put them in the positive or negative with the same (or nearly the same) intent and the same result. Did you come by here ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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5 votes

Why "previously learned knowledge" is a natural phrase in English, although "learn knowledge" is not?

TL;DR "learn knowledge" (present tense) is not natural because "learn" is already primarily associated with "knowledge" as concepts, theories, and facts, making "...
GratefulDisciple's user avatar
5 votes

Make or Do sushi?

They can be considered equal, in this context. To 'do sushi' really means they sell it, you can eat it there. They may make their own or buy it in from a supplier, but you can get it there. To 'make ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What's the meaning of "Making demands on someone" in the following context?

She expects that her sister will be needing help in the future; probably not particularly with housework, but emotional support and, if the sister has children, perhaps help with childcare.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.3k
4 votes

Do we say "put" a rental bike shop?

Seems like you have already gone through a few options. Here are some other alternative that come to mind. Establish a shop Set up a shop Open a shop Start a shop Place a shop Launch a shop Create a ...
binarystone's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

"slip free in one clean piece"

No, the whole phrase is not a collocation. Slipped free implies that the memory of this traumatic incident had easily 'broken away' from the rest of her memories and disappeared. A clean break is when ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.3k
3 votes

Odd one out–Is “a lush beach” so strange?

Yes, it would be strange. 'Lush' typically describes a green area with plants, grass, and trees. That doesn't fit an area covered with sand and rocks. It's true that 'lush' has come to have a wider ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
3 votes
Accepted

Can you say that a something meets certain limitations?

I think the word you might be looking for is "criteria", not "limitations", although it's hard to tell for certain without more context. To "meet the following criteria" ...
Billy Kerr's user avatar
  • 3,759
3 votes

first time meeting or to meet?

"First time meeting" is more common and natural. And works with other verbs as well: "This is my first time seeing an elephant in real life." "Is this your first time eating ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

If we can “give someone a call”, why can't we “give a phone call”?

A lot of your initial reasoning is around the expression 'to make' a phone call, which is different from 'to give' someone a call. 'Give (someone) a call' follows the same construction as other ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
3 votes

Is "covered wagons rolling access the prairies" wrong?

This example is a sentence fragment, not a complete sentence. In particular it is a noun phrase, headed by the noun "wagons" modified by the adjective "covered" and the participle &...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
3 votes
Accepted

How do you say you felt the same when someone said they were delighted: Do you say " "So, did I" OR "So was I."?

She says I think they were delightful, not I was delighted with them!! So, I did too means I thought so too, not I was delighted too. It does seem odd that the others reply in the past tense when ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.3k
2 votes

Make or Do sushi?

When it comes to food, "make" and "do" do not mean the same thing. (for context, this answer discusses slang. I come from an American background. This might be different in ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
2 votes

aggravate/exacerbate/heighten those disadvantages

This lazy attitude will only aggravate those disadvantages. Attestations of usage include misuse, and definitions are often only a rudimentary guide to how words should be used; aggravate is not the ...
TimR on some device's user avatar
2 votes

Make or Do sushi?

I1 believe your having trouble separating colloquial English from formally correct English. "To make" is the correct verb because it's used to describe the process of creating something. ...
JBH's user avatar
  • 3,767
2 votes

Do we say "put" a rental bike shop?

Sample: One idea might be to put a rental bike shop near the future park. Nothing wrong with "put" a shop near some other thing. More formal: locate - One idea might be to locate a rental ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.4k
2 votes
Accepted

Using "What" instead of "How many"?

Great question. The use of "what" there is not part of the grammatical structure, but is an interjection. If you remove "what", the grammar doesn't change. In writing, this "...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
2 votes

'Rescuers had to wade waist-deep in floodwater.' Why not 'Rescuers had to wade in waist-deep floodwater.'?

In addition to the points raised by others I think there is also the nuance that waist-deep in floodwater describes the level of water in relation to whoever is wading. Obviously we would get a ...
Jyrki Lahtonen's user avatar
2 votes

Why is the question tag for this sentence in Cambridge Dictionary shown like this? --- He gave up his job, did he?

Assertion followed by a question: You can hold your liquor, can't you? We've got to get these guys drunk at lunch so they overlook the fine print in the contract and sign it. The questioner wants to ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
2 votes

Is it correct to use the phrase"be with no access to X"?

It's fine, although not always very elegant, and you can certainly use various alternatives instead. Examples with copula (to be with no access): "The vulnerable groups are with no access to ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 2,447
1 vote
Accepted

"It was a stoney castle kind of thing." VS "It was kind of a stoney castle. --- Is the 1st sentence as valid as the 2nd one?

So, it was a stony, log cabin, castle kind of thing. So, it was kind of a stony log cabin castle. Question: Do you think "stony castle kind of a thing" is as valid as "kind of a stony ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.4k
1 vote
Accepted

Differences in job titles. "Manufacturing manager", "Production manager", "Manufacture manager"

"Manufacturing Manager" is correct. "Manufacture Manager" is incorrect, and fluent speakers will find it sounds wrong and unprofessional. "Production Manager" is correct ...
BadZen's user avatar
  • 3,729

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