32

Your assumption is correct—it's to distinguish between the city and the state. Idiomatically, it's simply the case that the phrase New York city (or the proper noun New York City) was picked as the more common "identifier" over than the phrase New York state (or the proper noun New York State). (Having said that, I have heard people refer to New York State—...


18

While watching some videos/movies or reading books in English, I tend to see that people always adding the word "city" to New York (New York City). What's behind this stuff in English? Adding the word "city" is not "stuff in English". The name of the city is New York City. Quite often, though – perhaps because it happens to be one of the biggest and ...


7

If I tell people that my wife and her family are from New York, they frequently assume I'm talking about New York City (NYC). Only I'm not, I'm talking about a place that's 5 and half to six hours away by car. It's fairly important to say whether you mean NYC or New York State because the city comes to mind first for most Americans, not the state -- which is ...


3

A native speaker might use any of the three options to describe their work. There are 2 million "pilates instructors", 50,000 "pilates coaches" and 87 "pilates trainers" on Google. For sports, the use of the word coach is most common, for example tennis/hockey coach. Instructor is most often for more complex activities, i.e. a driving instructor. ...


3

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, currency is the money that is used in a particular country at a particular time So, currency is money, and money cannot be high or low: it just is. An exchange rate (the rate at which the money of one country can be changed for the money of another country) can be high or low, but money can't be. A currency is ...


3

To commute is usually used to mean the action of going to and from work every day, with an implication that it is an appreciable distance, and that some form of transport is involved, such as car or train. "Do you live nearby?", "No, I have to commute." However, you certainly can override the implications: "I'm so lucky, commuting only takes 90 seconds as ...


2

This dress is amazing on you. is standard and not uncommon. Many people will be more likely to use "looks", but the meaning is roughly the same here. "Looks" simply explicitly comments on the visual appearance of the dress. Saying "this dress is amazing on you" likely also refers to visual appearance, but it could be a more general statement. For a ...


2

It depends on your variety of English. In the US, we do not say sit an exam. As far as I can tell, sit for an exam is acceptable. The two common ways I can think of expressing this in AmE are with take and have: I took an exam yesterday. I had an exam yesterday. This is what the Longman Dictionary has to say: test 1 EXAM a set of questions, ...


2

When you say "stronger" or "higher", it doesn't specify what you're trying to say. The amount of the currency might be higher. The buying power in different countries might be stronger. I'm assuming that you're talking about the value of the money. For example, 1 US dollar is worth more than 20 thousand Vietnamese Dong. In that case, I would say it as: ...


2

Unanimous agreement is better. Consensus is general agreement, whereas unanimity is complete agreement. Do not mix the two.


2

Are you sure you rememberd the thesis correctly? Usually it is A thesis on Translation Studies. Since it is a written body about a subject. and A degree in Translation Studies. Since it is a degree spent studying in a subject.


2

In you first sentence, serving time is a common expression. He's serving time in prison. He's serving time at the state penitentiary. The second and third are less common because the phrase serving time is generally not broken up by another word when talking about somebody's current state. (It can be broken up and understood, but it doesn't happen as ...


2

These words are related and doing one often implies doing the others at the same time, but they have slightly different meanings. Hosting is when you provide something using your personal resources. It is possible to "host" an event without being in charge of it, or responsible for its organization, by simply providing the space and other amenities for it. ...


2

Consider: After her parents died in the crash, her uncle was father and mother to her. There, to expresses the idea "in regard to her". He is not her own father. He is in the role of father and mother. The preposition of on the other hand expresses the concept of "possession", broadly construed. He is the father of those rambunctious boys. So, to ...


2

Even though "to edge" means to move slowly, you can use "slowly" to emphasise that movement. In this case, it helps to emphasise that additional care is to be taken when moving the car onto the road. It is similar to saying that "the athlete ran" vs "the athlete ran quickly". It emphasises the existing verb, and lets the writer be more descriptive.


2

These suggestions are all reasonable. "Jet-lag" is rather like a disease, and the sort of language that you could use with an illness (like "the 'flu") also works for jet-lag. He has jet-lag He is suffering from jet-lag He started to experience the symptoms of jet-lag... There is a useful adjective form "He is jet-lagged"


2

In the strict context of your example (and clarifications), you could simply use patients. This doesn't mean "going to hospital as a patient" - which has been answered by the others, but works as an alternative. 20% of more than 350 million patients prefer tertiary referral hospitals.


2

Commuting means "travelling to and from a particular place. Usually traveling to and from work". It usually is used to talk about travelling by car, bus or train to work. It could be used to mean walking to work, but if you can walk to work, the distance can't be so great, and you might not consider it to be "travelling" or "commuting". Nevertheless, some ...


1

Murders, rapes, robberies, crimes, offences are all count nouns (many words). Therefore, in the singular you can use a murder, a rape, a crime, etc. Adultery is a non-count noun (much word). Therefore there is no indefinite article (a) When you say he committed murder, it actually means He committed the crime of murder.


1

Actually depending on the context of the sentence these structures are actually interchangeable. People can commit murder. - People can commit crime. I stopped him before he could commit a murder. - I stopped him before he could commit a crime. The one without an article is referring to the action itself. Murder/Rape/Suicide/Adultery are all ...


1

Both are grammatically correct. Both plural and singular can be used. The better way to say it would be: But it is far enough away that early explorers had difficulties finding it. This shows all the explorers faced different difficulties.


1

The difference is in the degree of likelihood or plausibility the speaker is choosing to convey. If everyone in the world lives ... suggests that the speaker thinks this is something that could happen. Not necessarily that they think it likely, but that it is still a possibility. If everyone in the world lived ... suggests they think it unlikely ...


1

"I leave no room in my life for…" The idiom is "no room for..." https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/no-room-for-sth


1

Although I understand the words, I cannot, without more context understand the link between Governments and profit increase. I therefore base my answer on a different example. It shows that the words can have distinct meanings. It is obvious that they can often be used as synonyms. My example requires a little prior knowledge. No ordinary citizen can ...


1

The three questions are all perfectly grammatical and idiomatic. Using do I is an alternative to should I. Both constructions are typical of the questions that people who are new to a situation ask of instructors or experienced colleagues. They are seeking advice on the usual way of doing things. Can I is used more in a context where someone is asking ...


1

Do a quiz is the least formal. "Buzzfeed™: What brand of beer is your boyfriend?" There are no consequences and the results are probably meaningless or just for fun. Young students may get an unannounced "pop quiz" as an incentive to read the assignments. Take a test is what children do through middle school. They may take several tests each week to make ...


1

You are correct that usually we would not use "have" with a birthday or age. You made a great comment about "birthday party" fitting naturally into the sentence, and that is almost certainly the intention of the text. They are probably using "birthday" to mean "birthday party". However if whoever wrote that asked for my feedback, I would tell them that it ...


1

Someone can become certified as a pilates instructor, so that's probably your best bet. There are some nuanced differences between the three words, though all three make sense, instructor seems to be the most commonly used as well. Instructor is the broadest of the three terms. You can be a pilates instructor, a math (or maths) instructor, a cooking ...


1

From Merriam-Webster's definition of stage: 2 : to produce or cause to happen for public view or public effect // stage a track meet // stage a hunger strike Although an intervention is not normally a public spectacle (if talking about, for instance, an intervention for a specific person), the verb is used in the same way. In this case, it does seem ...


1

There's no requirement to use the merely because you're switching from a "standard" basis like weekly or monthly or quarterly to an idiosyncratic one: Salary is generally paid on a monthly basis, but sometimes on another basis that takes special circumstances into account. If you have given a name to that special basis earlier in the document, let's say ...


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