92

"Come in" is permission, offered to someone who has asked for it (by knocking, for example). Unsolicited, it sounds imperative, or presumptuous; though of course this can be moderated by tone of voice or other context. "Come on in" is an invitation, much better as an unsolicited offer to someone who may not have been intending to enter. Offered to someone ...


65

Eton is a prestigious British public school for boys. As an aside - in the British education system, a public school is a privately run school that people pay (large) fees to attend - normally a fairly old one. They're called 'public schools' because when they were established, schools were generally owned and operated by groups like the church or trade ...


43

Yes, I think buttload is an acceptable, informal substitute, at least in AmE. However, some might still find the usage of butt somewhat offensive since some people consider butt to be a mild curse word. These people might include parents with very young children. Even so, I think most kids, teens, and adults wouldn't mind. In any case, a few more casual, ...


42

I believe that you are referring to the idiomatic meanings. nailed it to complete a task successfully or get something right Example. A: Oh, you didn't burn the cake this time. B: Yep, nailed it! Nail down can have a similar meaning. nail down : to make (something, such as a victory) certain to happen <They need to score ...


38

"Come on in" has the same meaning as "come in" but is a more folksy way of extending the invitation. It suggests a kind of rural, down-home hospitality that is redolent of (American) TV shows of the '50s, which were ever a myth (although a persistent one) about how friendly people in the hinterland were. This is an AmE usage, so I wouldn't expect to ...


32

In the UK, you can still use the term bitch without embarrassment, providing that the context is clear: Our bitch, Sally, has just had pups. However, you might want to think twice before referring to someone else's dog as a "bitch". I have the feeling that the term is falling out of use, partly because most dogs are given names and so it can easily be ...


24

To add on to Werrf's answer: "I was down for Eton" is a very British and a very posh way to say that the speaker was supposed to attend school at Eton when he was old enough. It immediately identifies the speaker as a particular nationality and social class (so much so that I can practically hear the speaker's accent in my mind as I read it). Americans and ...


21

I like Max's answer, but having lived in NZ for a while (as a non-native English speaker), the first thing that came to mind was heaps. Noun (informal) - a great deal; an enormous amount ⇒ I've got heaps to tell you., ⇒ You have heaps of time. Adverb (informal) - used as intensifier; very much; a great deal ⇒ He said he was feeling heaps better., ...


18

The pronunciation of the preposition of and the auxiliary verb have are identical in casual speech. We say them as: /əv/. Basically, "you'd of thought" is a way to try and represent the sound of "you would have thought" in normal speech. Hope this is helpful!


18

The polite version of shitload is 'shedload' or 'shedloads'. Whether 'buttload' is acceptable or not probably depends where you are - it wouldn't be acceptable in front of children in the UK, or in BrE. I can't say I find it that pleasant either, and I'm not a child...


18

It is never easy to answer why a particular colloquial phrase is used. It just is. In this case I speculate that "come in" on its own might be thought to be slightly less encouraging than "come on in". You say "come in" if someone knocks on your door, and in that context it means "you may come in (if you really want to)". Whereas if you want to encourage ...


16

The suggestion in the question is fine. You could also point at the people and say, "You first, then you, then you, ..." Any difference is practical, rather than linguistic. It's probably easier for most people to remember "I go after Jane" and then just wait for Jane to go, than it is to remember "I'm number 17" and accurately count the number of people ...


14

In the U.S., it is only used in veterinary and dog-breeding circles. Outside of that, it is almost exclusively used as a pejorative.


13

In British English the ones I am most familiar with are the following: buzzed - (AmE) the person can feel the alcohol, but is still fairly capable of behaving normally and appearing sober. Could also say "I have a buzz." tipsy — the person has drunk sufficient quantities of alcohol to feel "light headed", their head may "tip" backwards or side to side. (I ...


12

It can be a subject, but only in the sense that people can use incorrect grammar. It isn't correct grammar, for the reason you correctly state. The correct usage is "My friend Tim and I are going to predict[...]". So you are correct, except common usage is to place the self last in the list, preceded by other pronouns, and putting any nouns first. So "My ...


12

British veterinarians and veterinary associations routinely use "bitch" to refer to female dogs and "dog" for males, particularly in the context of reproductive health. Example: BVA strongly supports the practice of neutering cats (castration of tom cats and spaying of queens) and dogs (castration of dogs and spaying of bitches) for preventing the ...


11

No, me can't be a subject:  1. *Me went to the movies. This is something no native speaker would say. It's out-and-out wrong. If you say this sentence, you sound like a caveman. But the following sentence is very different:  2. Me and my friend Tim went to the movies.  (often considered non-standard) Although this is perceived as ...


11

Okay, there are two flaws with this sentence: In English, it is generally considered polite to put yourself last in a list (assuming the list includes yourself). So the phrase would be "the wife and me" rather than "me and the wife". The sentence is not grammatically correct because it has no subject. It should be, "IT has the wife and me ..." But leaving ...


11

This is a good question, because this figure of speech occurs quite often among English language speakers. A "nail" in this context is a sharp, pointed metal object that you use to connect boards together, etc. : http://www.homedepot.com/p/Grip-Rite-11-1-2-x-2-3-8-in-8-Penny-Vinyl-Coated-Steel-Sinker-Nails-1-lb-Pack-8CTDSKR1/202308520 "nailed it" means you ...


10

As much as the question might have some implications (i.e. it implies that someone can't work and be a student at the same time - which is not true), the answer sounds correct, according to the definition of neither.


10

At an interview, you should not be too effusive with your greeting, or too verbose (unless invited by a leading question intended to draw you out). The interview panel makes the moves, so I suggest you be polite and uncontroversial. Good morning / afternoon is sufficient, with a brief look around the interviewers to make it clear you are greeting them ...


9

I have coffee on the outside This means that you have coffee on the outside of something. This does not mean you will drink coffee outside. For example you might be talking about the colour of paint: It's painted red on the inside, but I have coffee on the outside. "It has X on the outside" means that X is on the external surface of something. If you ...


9

She's been put through the wringer more than once. Usually the idiom refers to a single harrowing experience. A "wringer" or mangler was a machine used to squeeze water from washed and rinsed clothing.


9

You could say: He's been through the school of hard knocks. Wikipedia says: The School of Hard Knocks is an idiomatic phrase meaning the (sometimes painful) education one gets from life's usually negative experiences The phrase has made its way into some dictionaries. I think Macmillan's definition is a good one: the school of hard knocks - the ...


9

This is the most common meaning: NAIL IT (verb) to do something perfectly or successfully Example Sentences: Good luck on your performance today, Jimmy. I hope you nail it! Yes! I nailed it! Shouted the happy football player after the important goal.


9

Humans have been producing social meaning from language nearly as long as we've been producing excremental material from nutrition. We might not need many mental steps to move from buttload to shitload and, from that juncture, produce a picture, feeling or perception that some would find vulgar, inappropriate for some situations, or with which we might ...


9

Yes and no: it is meaningful, but you have to interpret it in a very specific way. The context is about the difference between -something you know (for example, a password) -something you have (for example, a key) -something you are (that is, you yourself!) The article starts by mentioning how we deal with how you prove something you know or something ...


9

I agree with the first part of stangdon's answer: The context is about the difference between something you know (for example, a password) something you have (for example, a key) I have a slightly different take on the "how you do you" part, though; I interpret that to mean that there is some kind of security mechanism based on how you ...


9

To have one's name down for something means: to have one's name on some list for some purpose. It could be for anything that requires being part of a list. Either a list that anyone can be on (volunteering) or some type of elite list where some institution is making a choice about who to choose for some job, training, education, etc. Here, Eton is an elite ...


8

You can add the verb go: You go first, you go second, and you go third. Or, some other verb might be more appropriate, depending on the situation. For example, to three kids sharing a dish of ice cream: You take a spoonful first, you go second, and you third.


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