23

The pairing of "basically literally" is very colloquial/informal and skews young. I hear it moderately frequently, mostly when people are recounting stories about personal interactions. It means "I am emphatic that my description conveys an accurate feeling of a moment/interaction, but it isn't literally true--I am exaggerating or simplifying for story ...


11

At an interview, you should not be too effusive with your greeting, or too verbose (unless invited by a leading question intended to draw you out). The interview panel makes the moves, so I suggest you be polite and uncontroversial. Good morning / afternoon is sufficient, with a brief look around the interviewers to make it clear you are greeting them ...


7

There is nothing very formal about "a bicycle pump". That is just the normal way to say it. It is completely normal in conversation. You could say "a bike pump", or just "a pump" when the context implies "bicycle" I borrowed a pump yesterday, because my bike's front tyre was flat.


6

Yes. "Good and [adjective]" is an idiom meaning "has become very [adjective]". Meaning 12.c of good in the OED: " c. colloquial (orig. U.S.). good and: (as an intensifier of an adjective) very, exceedingly; completely." with examples from 1885.


6

Yes. "Good and [adjective]" means "quite [adjective]" or "sufficiently [adjective]": If your knife is good and sharp you should be able to slice a tomato without squashing it. Make sure the surface is good and clean, or else the decal will not stick to it. You don't need to buy any fancy, expensive cat food. When that cat is good and ...


5

When politely greeting one person, we can say "good morning/afternoon/evening", and possibly add "sir" for a man, or "madam" for a woman, although these are now very old-fashioned in Western countries, except for e.g. royalty, judges in court, etc. "Sir" and "madam" do not have plurals. To greet a group, mixed in gender, we can say "Good morning/afternoon/...


4

I think it's a pretty funny joke. It made me laugh. As for touching it up to make it sound like natural English, I can think of two small improvements: 1) Change "that thing" to "that concept", which seems like something a professor would be more likely to say. 2) I might tweak the wording of the punchline. One comment suggests: Even I can understand ...


4

It has been awhile since I've read Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, but just from reading the selected passage, it's clear that Harry has lied to the 'she' in question (probably Hermione) about hiding from everyone since he got back from St Mungo's, and this 'she' knows this because Ron and Ginny told her that. We know that Harry is quite angry ...


3

Wiktionary gives the translation "orbiter", "A person who constantly hangs around with someone they are attracted to, but too shy to talk to." Alternatively, if I have misunderstood, a "Sugar daddy" is typically an older man who buys gifts for a younger woman. "A man who spends money for the benefit of a relationship with an often younger romantic or sexual ...


3

I think the word you're looking for is tear-jerker. Collins Dictionary If you refer to a play, film, or book as a tear-jerker, you are indicating that it is very sad or sentimental. [informal] Merriam-Webster a story, song, play, film, or broadcast that moves or is intended to move its audience to tears


2

In dialects where it is used (northern Midwest of the United States, I think, and I believe it's in nearby bits of Canada as well), you betcha is a general all-purpose affirmative. In other American dialects, you bet fills the same role. In other English dialects, you bet has a much more restricted role, serving only to indicate enthusiastic agreement - ...


2

"You betcha" is typically heard in the American Upper Midwest,1 but perhaps some people outside of that region also use the phrase. Its meaning is essentially the same as the more common "you bet." Both are used to mean, yes or definitely. As with all replies to "thank you," it doesn't have meaning beyond a friendly acknowledgment of the thanks. In other ...


2

In this quotation, "plum" is a misspelling of "plumb", which literally means "directly vertical, like a stationary string that has a lead weight at the bottom." The bolded phrase means "I would have straight-up ______ed him", or "I would have perfectly _____ed him". The verb that fills in the blank depends on the context. In this case, "______ed him" ...


2

I'm not sure if this is the correct answer but I'd'a is a informal contraction for (I would have). For example: if I had paid more attention to pop's last words I'd'a (I would have) heard him say what the code for the safe was. I'm not sure about this type of lingo but it seems that the character meant that he would've shot the other guy who shot him ...


2

It was always just a 'pump' for me. If it has a different name in professional circles I can't say! Check out some synonym sites, or check local slang (I am a Londoner).


2

It means people like you the way that you are and they don't want you to change they like the real you like you're not pretending to be something that you're not it's a compliment


2

Make up X doesn't mean just to fabricate something, but can mean to fabricate something really quickly or "on the spot." Plain make means to fabricate something without that additional implication. Since in many situations there's only so many valid excuses to use, and using an existing excuse is easier, perhaps that explains why made excuses is more ...


2

At least without surrounding context, no that is no the meaning for blow received from your sentence. "Blow it" already has a more common idiomatic expression: blow it slang: To ruin, mishandle, or fail to capitalize on an opportunity. Therefore it sounds like the woman failed an opportunity (apparently on purpose) to try to implicate a ...


2

Colloquially, yes. The second sentence is technically a sentence fragment, because by removing "it was" you remove the subject and verb. However, this is a natural drop in speech. For informal/fiction writing, this is fine. Definitely permissible. :)


2

There is no such rule, either in formal or informal English. There is a tendency for "going to" to be used to describe plans, but in many situations, both ways of talking about the future are possible and correct. A study of when "going to" is used will find lots of examples of it being used (both formally and informally) in situations when no clear plan ...


2

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shm-reduplication: Shm-reduplication is a form of reduplication in which the original word or its first syllable (the base) is repeated with the copy (the reduplicant) beginning with shm- (sometimes schm-), pronounced /ʃm/. The construction is generally used to indicate irony, sarcasm, derision, skepticism, or lack of ...


2

It is still extremely offensive. It seems that "nibba" is a recent invention, to get around censoring software on various internet forums. However it is still referring to another person as being inferior due to the colour of their skin, and so is offensive in most contexts. In most cases, you don't need to refer to the colour of a person's skin. Using ...


2

As you may be able to deduce from the example sentences given by sayfriend, “such a thing” is used to mean “a thing like that” or “a thing of that type”, while “such thing” is used with either a positive verb statement plus “no” (“I will do NO such thing”) or a negated verb plus “any” (“I wouldn’t [or would never] say ANY such thing”) to exclude an event ...


1

I agree with Em. that recently, "literally" has been used primarily for emphasis, especially by younger people. However, in cases where it is used for emphasis, I find you can drop it without changing the meaning of the sentence at all. In response to "Can you go pick up some bread?", "I literally just got back from the store" means the same as "I just got ...


1

In our language (Japanese), as Juhaz says at the comment line, there is no verb which is directly equivalent with the verb "equal". For example, in your case, x=3 sin(α), we take as, (SOV case) Xはsin(α)の3倍と等しい。 Here, 等しいis equal with English verb "equal", plus we need to insert a particle "と" in order for the sentence to make sense. So naturally or not, ...


1

There is a common and correct way of reading x = 3 sin(α) x is equal to three sine alpha. The use of "equal" as a verb to say "x equals..." is relatively modern. The word "equal" is still mostly used as an adjective except in mathematical contexts. Given that a common colocation is "equal to", it is unsurprising that some people might treat the verb ...


1

A term that comes to mind is nice guy. In most contexts, it simply means a guy who is literally nice. It is something both males and females would most often use to praise someone — It's great to be working with him; he's such a nice guy. "Nice" can have negative connotations, however, indicating someone who is not assertive or ruthless enough, and who ...


1

No, don't say "sirs and madams" under any circumstances. "Madams" are women who run brothels. I would recommend any of these. "Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen." "Good afternoon, everyone." "Good afternoon." Which is best depends on which country you're in.


1

Yes, but "Ladies and Gentlemen" is more conventional nowadays.


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