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This is a completely commonplace joke in English: Note that each time you make the joke, you do it with something different. It sounds funny with any cheap item you can think of. "With what you've got and one dollar you buy a whole donut." "What you've got and 10 cents is worth one whole toothpick." "What you've got and two bucks ...


7

I assume this is set in New York. The E train is the name of a New York subway line (it runs from downtown Manhattan to Queens). The cost of a ticket is $2.50 (or rather "was" from March 3, 2013 – March 21, 2015, as the cost now is $2.75) The woman is being sarcastic. She is insinuating that the man has no evidence. She says "with what you ...


1

It's not your call is less common not because of a linguistic reason, but simply because of its negativity (same as you saying "You're not the boss, don't tell us what to do!"). People tend to avoid saying it, instead they choose more tactful wording. Just the same reason I love you should be more common than I don't love you.


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It's more common in US English, less so in British English. The use of "call" to mean "decide" tends to be limited in BrEng to deciding on events (eg "call a meeting", "call an election" etc) and has wider use in AmEng (eg "call time", "call BS" etc) In British English, we instead usually say "...


1

Yes, it is fine in spoken English. In fact you should find it is more common in speech. Note that "It's your call" means "It is your decision to make". So "It's not your call" means "It is not your decision to make". So it is a slightly argumentative phrase. You are exerting authority over someone. I'm think we ...


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In colloquial English, there's one expression that's frequently used. I can't guarantee that Australian English slang doesn't have a better or a more common one health nut It used to be that eating yogurt in itself qualified you as a health nut. Those days are long gone and yogurt is as un-weird as a glass of milk. A health nut is someone who is ...


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You could say that a person: cares about themselves Or to be more specific, a person practices: healthy/healthful living Healthy living is defined as: With dramatically rising rates of overweight and obesity, “healthy living” needs to become a way of life for more Canadians. Making healthy food choices, staying physically active and maintaining a ...


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It's certainly a common expression. "I haven't a clue" is a slightly abbreviated form of "I have not got a clue". Said in response to a question you do not know the answer to, it literally means that, not only do you not know the answer but neither do you know anything which might act as a clue towards the correct answer. It might well be ...


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It would not sound at all natural in the U.S. It is my impression (which may be wrong because I have never been to India) that referring to people in general as "dear" may be common in Indian English, but in the U.S that locution is usually restricted to family members, very close friends, lovers, and pets. It is not a general salutation, but indicates ...


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If you find "no" impolite (which it isn't necessarily), you can make it less so: No, sir/no, ma'am (prevalent in the southern United States, at least) No, thank you [for asking]. No more questions sounds abrupt to me, perhaps because it is an incomplete sentence that might be used as a proscriptive command. Instead, I would suggest I have no more ...


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