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The inclusion or exclusion of the comma changes the meaning of the sentence: His beautiful, yet messy and long hair was a thing to see. means that you are qualifying / contrasting that his hair, whilst beautiful, is also 'messy and long'. However, I would include a comma after hair to make it sound more natural: His beautiful, yet messy and long hair, ...


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The word "yet" introduces a contrast. Everything before the next comma is included in that contrast. It doesn't make sense to contrast "beautiful" with "hair", so you need a comma before you get to "hair". If you put the comma right before "hair", you are contrasting "messy and long" with "beautiful", which is a bit weird. But if you put the comma after "...


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I don't think you need a comma before an "and". But if you use a comma and an "and" word, it will lead to another independent clause. (My teacher said "," + "and" = ";") Find more here: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/30516/should-i-use-a-comma-before-and-or-or


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Comma after discrimination and after prescription but note that this is still wordy and does not flow as a sentence. Try Supporting guidance on 'Fair trading requirements' advises that discrimination is forbidden in regard to the costs of the goods and services, against those owners who wish to obtain a written prescription.


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Better to say the number (or quantity) of sheets. Leave out 'do'. You can leave out 'these'. I would only use it if indicating the sheets to someone present at the time.


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Despite these drawbacks, this may be a well-accepted and, additionally, environmentally friendly solution in the near future. No hyphen in "environmentally friendly". Use the article "the". Replace "close" with "near" (much more idiomatic).


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I'd just remove additionally and rephrase the sentence as Despite these drawbacks, this may be a well-accepted, environment-friendly solution in the close future. But if you want to stick to the word additional, which I'd deem redundant, then I'd rephrase the sentence as Despite these drawbacks, this may be a well-accepted and additionally, an ...


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Well, both lack an oxford comma. And I would argue that the clause you refer to is not non essential. Poorly written sentence because not everything is at tweet speed.


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First of all, I don't think this is a matter of "so" at all. It is essentially the issue of commas with coordinating conjunctions: FANBOYS. Yes, when two independent clauses are connected with a conjunction, a comma is often used. This is not a strict rule, but a general guideline (note how I used a comma before 'but' even though it is not needed/...


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Agreed! Be aware that BBC online journalists work under a great deal of pressure to write and illustrate their reports, often needing to attach photo, audio and video software as part of the process. They are seldom concerned with the finer points of punctuation. P.S. I used to be one.


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I think "naked" in this case can be used figuratively; or perhaps for stylistic reasons. "A skeleton is a human being in its most naked form." - Your Bones Live On Without You This doesn't appear to be the case with your sentence. A naked skeleton would be one with flesh on it, but not fur or skin. From Collins, if an animal or part of an animal is ...


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A skeleton can be "stripped of its flesh". This would perhaps be most often used of a skeleton that is quite young: After death, the body is placed on a podium until the skeleton is stripped of its flesh by birds. The bones are then placed in a pot, which is buried outside the village. Otherwise, a "skeleton" implies that there is no flesh remaining. ...


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