New answers tagged

1

away from = far from = far away from 1. A is away from B. = A is far from B. (e.g., "That's far from here!") = A is far far away from B. Note : Far from (idiom) : not at all. e.g., "Hearing the news, she was far from disappointed." "He's not handsome - far from it." farther from = farther away from C is farther from D. =...


3

I am far from X - X can be a person/place/thing to express physical distance; or X can be status or emotion to say you are not X, like I am far from angry. I'm actually very pleased. I am away from X - X can only be a person/place/thing to express physical distance. I am far away from X - Same as I am away from X, though it can sometimes be used like I am ...


2

"Far" and its comparative and superlative may work with or without "away." To my ear, the "away" forms sound more common than the other, which seems old fashioned, but this perception may reflect mere regional differences or a difference between written and spoken English. Ngram, however, disagrees with me and shows "farthest from" as being considerably ...


2

No, you may not modify a comparative adjective in this way. However, in mathematics, we write C < B < A, which could be read in a number of ways: C is smaller than B, which is smaller than A. A is larger than B, which is larger than C. B lies between A and C. Depending on the context, any of these could work. Hope this helps!


3

Yes, you can use clauses after "than". Your last two examples are fine. You first example doesn't work, though. You could say "You are better than you were yesterday."


0

Yes. I am going to introduce you to her next week. She is an old woman. This sounds definite in assigning the woman a label: she is old. That's what she is. She is instantly lumped together with old people. I am going to introduce you to her next week. She is an older woman. Here the age of the person of interest is much less clear. Usually the ...


1

It is natural to use it. It's used both as a polite euphemism, because calling someone "old" can be interpreted as insulting, and as a way of indicating a particular age range. In my colloquial experience, an older man is 50 - 65, while an old man is 70s and up. Someone might use "elderly" as a more delicate substitute for "old."


2

I am not sure of the community's preferred approach here. I love the basic thrust of Michael D's answer, but dislike the attempted and unwarranted assumption of numerical quantification: English has ways to describe differences in degree that make no claims to numeration. In fact, numerical quantification in such circumstances is often purely metaphorical. ...


2

Oxford Dictionaries defines this sense of better as partly or fully recovered from illness, injury, or mental stress. So if you say that someone has got better from an illness, it usually means that they have fully recovered. But if you say that a sick person is feeling better today, they are probably still unwell but improving.


-1

He is well again implies he has completely recovered. He is less ill implies he has partially recovered albeit relatively not completely. It is unclear on the level of recovery from complete illness. He is better implies he has partially recovered, but still not completely. It is unclear on the level of recovery from complete recovery. It could ...


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