35

I'd go with "Them's my boys!" It is not "grammatical" but it preserves the casual and dialectical feel of the original, as well as the prosodic features.


32

I'd feel fine saying or hearing "That's my boys!". "That's my boy!" is literally a prideful expression of the exclaimer's relationship to a single boy which also implies some degree of personal responsibility for or shared ownership of the boy's success which prompted the exclamation. "That's my boys!" implies the same degree of pride and personal ...


25

Strangely here is not a predicative complement of the verb feel but an adverb modifying as though he had entered a very strict library. Compare these parallel uses with a different PC (1) and different adverbs (2,3): Harry felt strangely happy. Harry felt just as though he had entered a very strict library. Harry felt almost as though he had entered a ...


13

The more idiomatic expressions that you hear used are "You make me whole" and "You complete me".


12

I think you are confusing two different meanings of consider. If you consider X Y or consider X to be Y (these expressions are equivalent), consider means "believe" or "maintain": you hold or express the opinion that X is Y. I consider Sartorius a fool. If you consider X as Y, consider means "take under consideration" or &...


12

There are several different ways of producing subordinate clauses: with that ... that he becomes/should become a baseball player with a marked infinitive ... [him] to become a baseball player with an unmarked infinitive ... become a baseball player with for + a marked infinitive ... for him to become a baseball player with a gerund ... becoming a ...


12

I think this is a very interesting question! If you would use strange, the sentence would become Harry felt strange, as though he had entered a very strict library. Which would mean that as though he had entered a very strict library explains why Harry feels strange. But that is not what was written... In the actual sentence, Harry felt as though he ...


11

There's absolutely nothing wrong with it. Here's why: Success can be a noun that refers to a person. From Google "define: word" a person or thing that achieves desired aims or attains prosperity. Overnight can mean "very quickly" From Google "define: word" very quickly; suddenly. The use of overnight success is very common See more ...


10

This may be a regional thing (I'm from London) but I definitely find sentence 3 odd: This is a deep lake to swim As another answerer has already mentioned, I would generally expect to see: This is a deep lake to swim in. And I confess I was quite surprised to see how many people found the original sentence natural. It is certainly true that you can ...


8

For the "become" example, both versions are correct in the sense that native speakers will sometimes say it that way. However, the "to" is not really needed, so the sentence is better without it. ("Omit needless words", as they say; and the version with the extra "to" is somewhat informal.) What he wants to do is [to] become a ballplayer. For the paper ...


8

Part 1 Subjects: Words, Phrases and Functions To make this section of the answer easier to think about, let's look at an even simpler example: There's a new president. The number one question here is: What is the subject of this sentence? This isn't as easy as it looks. If we want to answer this question we need to really understand what a subject is. ...


8

All five sentences are grammatically correct. Sentences #3 and #4 are the trickiest. These two sentences are perfectly idiomatic: . 2. Do you have something to eat? . 5. She lived to be ninety. Sentence 5 implies that "she" is dead. "She's ninety" or "She has lived to be ninety" or "She's looking forward to her ninety-...


8

I had to think a bit about why that sounds funny to me. While whole is indeed both an adjective and a noun, so there isn't anything grammatically wrong with the sentence, the question "your whole what?" comes to mind. This is the reason for Subjunctive's comment. While we see what you are driving at, we just don't say this. She is your whole something, ...


7

I think I understand where your confusion stems from, but please correct me if I am wrong! You are confusing verbs that take the gerund or the infinitive. Some verbs usually take the gerund for example; enjoy, hate, finish, mind, practise, spend, suggest, stop and phrasal verbs, e.g. give up, go on, take up etc. He enjoyed swimming a lot. They hate ...


7

You can just try : "My boys !"


7

If the questioner is using "That's my boy" to indicate that a certain action or behaviour, such as a comment, which has just taken place is highly characteristic and representative of the male person to whom it refers then more appropriate than "those" or "them's" would be "That's my boys". "That's my boys" effectively says "That's typical of my boys", "...


7

It sounds like you're asking for an answer in terms of CGEL terminology. Since you asked on ELL, though, I'll write you an answer targeted at someone learning English rather than learning CGEL. I offer no rules here, only an explanation of what's going on. It's probably not what you're looking for qua linguist, but hopefully you'll find it useful qua learner ...


6

You can say "I am (adjective)" with no article: I am hungry. I am late. I am tired. But if you are using a noun, then an article is required: I am a software developer. I am the boss. And the article is still required if you are using a noun phrase that includes adjectives modifying the noun: I am a hungry, tired boy.


6

If the intended sense of "That's my boy" is "Well done young man!", then a colloquial plural version, certainly in the UK, would be "Good lads!" The problem with "Them's my boys" as a plural version is that it only makes sense if said to someone other than the boys in question, whereas with the singular "That's my boy" is typically used as praise to the boy ...


6

It only can mean "returned back to the place, this time as a hero" If he was a hero, and then stopped being a hero, and then become a hero once more, the phrase would be "Zeng returned to being a hero".


6

It is a noun phrase, and the subject of the sentence. It is not a clause, but it contains one. The noun phrase has a noun "the way" and a relative clause; "we are learning English" is the relative clause, it describes the noun "way". You could also write "The way that we are learning English". The word "is" is the main verb (not an auxiliary) and "not good"...


5

Highlighted sentence is not complete till the colon, and the structure is: Subject+ verb+ object(the word)+adverb(only as connected with... till the colon) The advocacy of this thought is that the adverb is not complete without a part of it; "only as connected with" can not be split at this example, and the whole thing can answer the sole question asked to ...


5

I will try to answer this from a learner's point of view. I agree with @StoneyB. In the end, you will need to know each and every one of them. Up to this point, I couldn't find "one rule to cure them all" yet. But after spending years learning English, at some point I realized this very useful guideline on my own. This guideline helps me choose the correct ...


5

That is correct. Dare can't make up its mind whether it's a full modal, taking a bare infinitive, or a lexical verb taking a marked infinitive catenate. My impression (it's no more than that) is that in speech the modal use with the bare infinitive is more common in negative expressions (Don't you dare eat that apple) and the lexical use with the marked ...


5

My old school grammar, written for Germans, says about the use of the indefinite article: The indefinite article is used (contrary to German) when indicating 1 profession or membership 2 nationality 3 religion especially after "to be" and "to become" 1a He is a teacher/a member of the PEN Club. 2a She is an American. 3a He is a Catholic. Longman English ...


5

I don't think any sprachgefühl is lost when you make it plural. I can't say I've heard someone exclaim "those are my boys" as much I have heard "that's my boy." I think the feeling that is usually conveyed by this expression is one of boastfullness. Is that the sprachgefühl you were going for? By the way, sprachgefühl is a very cool word--thanks for ...


5

2. "There" is a dummy pronoun. A simple diagnostic test that demonstrates that the existential "there" word is a pronoun is to show that it can occur as the subject in an interrogative tag. For example: "There was a cat under the table, wasn't there?" Only pronouns can be used as a subject in an interrogative tag like the one ...


5

An object is a kind of complement—a piece of the sentence which "completes" the meaning of the verb. A "complete sentence" does not necessarily require either an object (a Direct Object or Indirect Object) or any other kind of complement; it depends on what verb is employed. Some verbs require at least one object. We call these transitive, from Latin ...


5

It doesn't make sense unless you expand the quote a little: But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can ...


5

"You complete me" would be very proper, but "You are my whole", based on the tendency of most to take things in a sexual nature might lead to you getting slapped...


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