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In most forms of standard English, negatives don't agree with each other, each negative negates something separately. So: "If I use the microphone, somebody will hear me" can mean that using the microphone causes at least one person to hear. "If I don't use the microphone, somebody will hear me" can mean that speaking without the ...


18

The statement that one should not use a double negative is a caution against a particular dialect form well-known to native English speakers. It is something primary school teachers say to native speaking children. The caution should not be understood literally. It does not mean that all uses of double negation are incorrect. A more precise statement of the ...


4

A double negative is something of the form ¬(¬ P). The ¬ sign denotes negation. Your statement is something of the form (¬ M) ⇒ (¬ H). The ⇒ sign denotes implication. In classical logic, ¬(¬ P) is the same as simply P. In English, this is not quite so clear-cut, informal speech often uses double negative as emphasized negative instead. But an implication ...


2

Direct questions usually have an inverted word order where an auxiliary verb precedes the subject, e.g. "How would you do it?". The question you were asked was: "How would you organise the process?" But indirect questions embedded in subordinate clauses don't have this inversion: I was asked how I would organise the process. They ...


2

To assign a_very_special_variable, use a separate line. is perfectly fine and preferably brief. The second sentence is clear, but could be better worded: To assign a_very_special_variable, the use of a separate line is required. You could probably use either with "Exception:" in front, or without it - even though this is not strictly and ...


2

Though it's generally discouraged, this approach is acceptable in some rare cases. Though generally discouraged, this approach is acceptable in some rare cases. As BillJ pointed out, "it" in the first sentence is a pronoun rather than relative pronoun (who, whose, which, and that) for "this approach". Both examples are fine, and I ...


1

Yes indeed. The if clause in the sentence makes a significant difference as compared to other common sentences. If this would be considered in logical terms of computing world or mathematics, then it is very much possible to use double negation in a single sentence. Also, as you already mentioned anybody/anyone simply doesn't make sense. No one/nobody is ...


1

"Should" emphasises the hypothetical nature of the condition and makes it seem less likely or more remote. Should you fail to do so, we would have no choice but to take further action. This is the inverted form of "If you should fail...". It can equally be expressed as "If you failed..." or "If you were to fail...". ...


1

if only even if for no other reason than: Willy would have to tell George more, if only to stop him pestering. (Oxford Dictionary of English) b) used to give a reason for something, although you think it is not a good one Media studies is regarded as a more exciting subject, if only because it’s new. (Longman) Hirohito would continue to act for the rest ...


1

I was afraid he would offer me meat. I was afraid he offered me meat. Only the first makes sense to me. I cannot think of a context in which the second would be correct. I was afraid he would offer me meat This means that he hadn't offered anything yet. You were concerned that if he were to offer you food in the (near) future, he would offer meat. I was ...


1

It is a logical if / then statement, not a self-contradictory statement.


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This is more the case of hidden assumptions and overstating the impact for emphasis. “If you don't use a mike,” the certain assumption is your voice won’t be as loud as it could be. The hidden assumption is “Amplified” ;) that a mike,( amp and speaker) are needed for everyone to hear, yet some may hear it otherwise, but that’s insufficient. This statement “...


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@FumbleFingers in a comment, answered: The archetypal "double negative" for your cited context is “...nobody won't hear me.”


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I understand that you can't have a double negative Your statement is incorrect It may be the source of your misunderstanding. In English you can have a double negative. The meaning however doesn't accord with the meaning in many other languages. For example "I don't not like ice-cream" in English means "I do like ice-cream". Would you ...


1

Double negatives would be "If I don't not use a microphone" or "nobody will not not hear me." A negative in one phrase (no microphone, not hear) doesn't apply to the other.


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The example sentence is probably not going to be considered as a "double negative" because the use of two negatives has not created more intensity. The two negatives "don't" and "nobody" appear to be used to assert an implication - "If no microphone, then no hearing", without intensity. The logic for deciding whether a ...


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