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This is not a case of "would had" (which is never correct). In the first part of the sentence, the contraction "I'd" is not short for "I would", but rather it is actually short for "I had", so it means: If I had had my phone with me, I would have texted you to say where I was. Here, "had had" is the past perfect of "to have". The past perfect tense is ...


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All "if" statements are conditional, but there a few quite distinct contexts in which you might say something like "if they could". Many "if" statements are straightforward "if x is true, then y is true". For example: If it rains, we will get wet. However, consider this example: If kids were given scissors they could cut their own hair. Like the ...


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I would replace will be with is in your sentence. With is, you still get the sense of being in the future since it is part of the conditional. It usually sounds incorrect to have will in the condition part of the conditional. There is actually a whole section on Wikipedia, Use of will and would in condition clauses, directly addressing this. The main ...


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The "had broken" form may have a different meaning to the "had been broken." It depends on the rest of the story. What would have happened if the bridge had broken while we were crossing it? This means that the person is concerned for the possibility the bridge might have failed when he was on it. Maybe the story is about some rickety rope-and-plank ...


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"Break" has both a transitive and intransitive meaning. My computer broke while I was trying to write my paper is perfectly idiomatic and grammatical. We tend to use the verb transitively when the cause of the breakage is known. We tend to use the verb intransitively when the cause is unknown. It is, however, odd to use "break" with something as ...


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