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The first part of the sentence “India’s concern is that if it makes a decision” IS hypothetical. India might make a certain decision, or it might not. So "China would" (or "could") is appropriate. You could use "China will . . ." (Also, "makes a decision" instead of "takes a decision" would be more common.)...


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India’s concern is that if it takes a decision that irks Generals in Myanmar, China would get closer to the junta and use the opportunity to hurt India’s interests in Myanmar. Q. But here, Is the first part of the sentence “India’s concern is that If it takes a decision” hypothetical? I don’t think so. Then why would is used in later part? Making ...


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Usually effects come after causes, not before. So you're asking about cases where one of two things is true. (1) The consequent isn't actually a consequence, but something else like a precondition or an inference. (2) You're considering a causal relationship that runs backwards in time (because someone has a time machine, or the ability to foresee the future,...


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if present tense + subject would/will. Examples - a. If Mary tells you the details of her job, she would be failing in her duties.--v--b. If Mary tells you the details of her job, she will be failing in her duties. Q. I have seen this sort of pairing (present tense in the if-clause and "would in the main clause) before. I'd like to know if a is ...


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"If...were..." implies an unreal conditional sentence. This is simply a concept that is being posited by the person. (case "a", above). It does not imply the likelihood of buses appearing in the future.


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Some people see the scene and think it means that Sherlock is "very good with grammar" or "is very picky about grammar". But that scene is not about grammar. It is to show us how Sherlock doesn't care about people's feelings. He only cares about the case. When talking to the man with bad grammar he realises that the man is guilty, so ...


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If I were to succeed, I would have to toil a lot. If I was to succeed, I would have to toil a lot. If I am to succeed, I would have to toil a lot. The 1st example is in subjunctive mood. It expresses something desired or imagined, or events not certain to happen. The 2nd example is in the 2nd conditional, expressing something unlikely to happen. The 3rd ...


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I believe what is meant here is better said with: Message me whenever you need help. As pointed out in a comment, the sentence gives instruction to someone to do something in the future, so basing it on something in past tense ('thought', 'needed') is a little confusing. The revised sentence keeps the implication that the person to whom this is said or sent ...


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A) was / will visit "Was" is the past tense and "will" is the future tense. The tenses do not match, and the sentence does not make sense. B) were / will visit Here the subjunctive mood is used. The sentence makes sense: He would visit us if he were to be in Tokyo, but he is not in Tokyo, so he does not visit. C) will be / will visit I ...


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1- would become 2- become 3- will become Cambridge Dictionary defines 2) as Real conditionals and 3) as First conditional (likely to happen). As the scenario is real, 2) is more appropriate.


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Either 2 or 3 would be correct here. However, there is a subtle difference in implication. The first sentence is a simple statement of fact. If you do not eat, then you become hungry. The second has a nuance of warning about it: the speaker is explaining the consequences of an unwise course of action. That is: "If you (in the near future) do not eat (...


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If I were is used for unreals or hypotheticals - although (especially informally) "if I was" is often substituted for it. However, If I was is correct for real, known or presumed conditions. Here, "were" feels wrong (perhaps a hypercorrection). So if you can replace the word "If" with "Given that" or "Granted ...


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This is one of those things where there is one thing that is technically correct, but there is a different thing that everyone actually says. Those are both conditionals (the second one being past tense), and if you were to ask an English teacher, they would tell you that “weren’t” is the only correct answer for both. On the other hand, if you were to ask a ...


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Option 3 is correct: I would come, but my mum is very ill and I have to take care of her. "Would" indicates your personal intention, so this means that you would personally choose to go, but there is a reason that prevents you. The others need attention, for various reasons. I could come, but my mum is very ill and I have to take care of her. &...


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"When" can be used, because it's a certainty that it does happen that teenagers sometimes get pregnant when they are in high school. You can also use "if". It's a slight difference in perspective that doesn't affect the overall meaning in that sentence.


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