55

"Craft" is one of those words that has several very different meanings. "Craft" could mean "skilled work" or "hobby". In this case, the plural is "crafts" - such as in "arts and crafts". "Craft" can also mean a vehicle that people use to travel through water, air, or outer space. In this case, the plural is "craft" (no 's') - such as in "aircraft", "...


31

Your assumption is correct—it's to distinguish between the city and the state. Idiomatically, it's simply the case that the phrase New York city (or the proper noun New York City) was picked as the more common "identifier" over than the phrase New York state (or the proper noun New York State). (Having said that, I have heard people refer to New York State—...


30

I think there is a distinction to be drawn here which will allow you to avoid confusion; namely: the noun "craft" has several meanings, while "aircraft" has only one. The meaning you are focused on is "craft" as a moving vessel, such as watercraft, aircraft, or spacecraft. All three of these terms as well as "craft" itself are the same in their singular and ...


21

I've upvoted user178049's comment about just memorizing them, but here are some mnemonics to get you started: Then v. Than thEn = nExt If you don't mean "next," then don't write "then" (generally). Their v. There "THERE" is "NoT HERE." If you mean "noT HERE," then write "there." Also watch out for the contraction of "they are," "they'...


20

The two phrases can be used in different contexts, so it'll be hard to explain ONE difference that always holds true. That said, I'd suggest that: "Get it right" means, "Get your facts straight." "Make it right" means, "You messed up and hurt someone, now go fix the situation." For example: Did you hear Justin ...


19

While watching some videos/movies or reading books in English, I tend to see that people always adding the word "city" to New York (New York City). What's behind this stuff in English? Adding the word "city" is not "stuff in English". The name of the city is New York City. Quite often, though – perhaps because it happens to be one of the biggest and ...


15

'Genuine' in this case (the world of fine art) would imply that the copy is a fake, a forgery, intended to deceive or defraud a buyer. Instead, it was probably a copy by hand or photographic reproduction intended to illustrate the work for audiences who could not travel to the Louvre. So we refer to the "original" work of art.


11

"Get it right" means that you are going to do something right the first time. You're working on a project, and you are determined to do it the correct way. "Make it right" means more to fix something that is already wrong. You've taken something already created (or some harm already done) and decided to fix it. If it's so bad that it can't be repaired, you ...


11

Generally if you say "last Tuesday", people understand you to mean the Tuesday from the preceding calendar week. That is, if today is Wednesday and it is the 15th of the month, "last Tuesday" would mean the 7th. If you want to refer to the day just past, simply use the name of the day. Like if it is Wednesday and you want to talk about something that ...


11

The [sic] is just wrong. Ultimately, whoever wrote this seems to just not know what he's talking about. "We got" is incorrect, so [sic] after both instances of that would make sense. Others have pointed out that 93 is the incorrect age, so [sic] after 93 would make sense, too. "Are of 60 years old" is incorrect, so [sic] after "of" would make sense. In ...


11

No, they should be: Will my app be affected if this line of code gets removed? Will these changes affect my code? Part of the confusion may be that effect can be used as a noun or a verb; affect can only (usually)1 be used as a verb. effect as a noun - Refers to how something is changed or behaves differently as a result of an action. "All ...


7

The word original works better when there is only one work in question: This is a copy; the original Mona Lisa hangs in the Louvre. The word genuine could work if we are talking about something that is not a forgery or a reproduction: This is a genuine Manet painting. means that Manet painted it; it's not some facsimile of a Manet work. In some contexts,...


7

Prepositions often have overlapping usages, but that's not quite the same as "interchangeable". In your examples, notice how you had to switch the form of the word buy to make both sentences sound okay. Both for and to can be used to explain a reason or motivation for something. However, when used in this way, to is followed by a verb, but for is ...


7

Use than for comparison. (It might help to pronounce it as "comparisan".) Example. I am taller than you. There is a hare in their chair [over there]. The first "there" is used to show existence. Their shows possession. You can include "over there". "Over there" is often used to say that something is in the distance (location, not here). 1 This ...


7

If I tell people that my wife and her family are from New York, they frequently assume I'm talking about New York City (NYC). Only I'm not, I'm talking about a place that's 5 and half to six hours away by car. It's fairly important to say whether you mean NYC or New York State because the city comes to mind first for most Americans, not the state -- which is ...


6

No, they are not interchangeable. Here, for takes a noun, not a verb (bare infinitive). So your choices are the nouns affect and effect. Affect (noun) is uncommon (in everyday use). It seems to be a psychological term given. The dictionary gives affect 1. the conscious subjective aspect of an emotion considered apart from bodily changes; also : a set ...


6

The or in The moose (North America) or elk (Eurasia) implies that moose is used in North America, whereas elk is used in Eurasia. In fact, the article goes on to mention: Alces alces is called a "moose" in North American English, but an "elk" in British English; its scientific name comes from its name in Latin. So what you call it depends on the ...


5

"Affective" is a psychological term meaning "having to do with emotions". Psychologists will say things like, "The patient exhibited affective behavior." This is a rather rare word, and unless you're talking about psychology, it's probably not what you mean. "Effective" is a common word meaning "having the intended result" or "in operation". In the first ...


5

"Revocate" means to call back, recall. For example, to send a message to troops to retreat. I have an excellent vocabulary, but was previously unaware this word existed, so I think it's reasonable to assume its use will usually raise eyebrows among even very fluent, well-educated speakers — most of whom will assume you misspelled "revoke". Some ...


5

If the goose gets loose, you lose your job. (2 o's in goose and loose. and they rhyme. once you know that, you're set.)


5

The relevant part of the South China Morning Post story looks like this: @elmoehussaini posted: “We got a PM who’s [sic] 93 years old. We got a Team of Eminent Persons to repair the economy who are of 60 years old and above. I guess the “I’m too old for this s***” is no longer valid.” The word sic is customarily, but not always, printed in italics, ...


4

In 'making it right' you are asking a person to correct an injustice, to change a state from being unfair to fair. The person who is being asked obviously has some ability, power or influence to be able to alter whichever situation you are trying to make fair again while the person asking lacks or is unable or incapable of changing the unfair situation ...


4

I would say that yes, there are contexts where only "all right" is acceptable. As an example: Are any of the answers wrong? No, they are all right i.e., all of them are correct. I have found that alright seems to be following the example of all ready vs. already and all together vs. altogether. In both cases, as I did above, one could add the phrase "of ...


4

There is indeed a noun affect, which I didn't find out until I got to college and did some study of the psychology of music. The noun affect means "an expressed or observed emotional response." While either noun could be used correctly, I would use effect. The term for effect is idiomatic and generally understood, and the use of affect as a noun is very ...


3

We say "suspected" (as an adjective) to refer to a person or thing that we think may have done whatever, some specific act, or be whatever, some specific object. We say "suspicious" to refer to a person or thing that is of a type or character that leads us to think that they may do bad things. For example, suppose a crime has been committed, say a murder. ...


3

"Whose bright idea" is correct. "Whose" is the possessive form of "who", like "his" is the possessive form of "he". For example, I might say, "This is HIS book", meaning, this is the book that belongs to "him" (whoever "him" is in context). If I don't know who owns the book, I might ask, "Whose book is this?" Are you thinking that "who's" is possessive, ...


3

"Floor" can mean a level in a building, like "my office is on the second floor", or it can mean the part of the room that you stand on. "Flooring" as a noun is the material you use to make a floor. In the U.S. these days -- I don't know about construction in other countries -- we usually buy flooring in tiles that are 1 foot square or thereabouts, or in ...


3

In this case, "original" and "copy" are part of the jargon used. The original is that which the copy is made from. Compare with using a copying machine. If you copy a document, the document being duplicated is referred to as "the original" and the duplicate is "the copy". Even if "the original" may itself be a copy of the real, genuine document!


3

Preface This is a new answer (Jan 2015) to a two-year old question (Jan 2013). I revived this thread because I believe this provides a best-of-class answer that complements the well-deserved selected answer by J.R.. It's a tall order to come in so late with such a bold statement. I only ask that as you assess the value of this answer (for better or ...


3

I think the other answers are correct, but it's easier for me to just remember: THEN is for time or order. Do this, then that. THAN is comparison. I'd rather do this than that. THEIR is possessive. Their house is nice. THERE is location. The house over there is nice. THIS is singular. This chair is heavy. THESE is plural. These chairs are heavy.


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