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You're right to wonder what they're talking about. Here's what they're trying to point out. In this sentence: Now that I'm married, I don't go out in the evenings so much. the word now introduces a subordinate clause: "I'm married". The phrase now that functions like "because" (also a conjunction). In British English, people sometimes drop the that, but ...


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Your sentences are both problematic in several respects. Correcting bad grammar is not what we do on this site but here are some suggestions. Whereas does not work in your example. Whereas balances or compares one thing against another. You will find numerous examples of its use online. Jane does not have the qualifications for this job whereas Margaret ...


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A comma can be used to separate clauses in the same sentence. It doesn't always go after the word "therefore". One of the most famous quotes containing the word is: I think, therefore I am. "Therefore" is a conjunctive adverb that you can use as a transition word in sentences and paragraphs. In your example, it begins a sentence, so there must have been ...


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There is a conjunction; it's just that it's been omitted—but still understood to exist: Sometimes the symptoms are so slight [that] you do not even know you have an allergy. It's common to omit the use of that in many constructions. Idiomatically, the two parts of the sentence are understood to have the relationship between each other made explicit by ...


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