2

There is always another alternative, regardless of it being explicit or not. He called to check whether she was okay. (or not okay) She didn't know whether to continue with the plan. (or not continue the plan)


2

No, not necessarily. A comma is used when listing multiple things. For example, I ate my meals, took a shower, and played the game yesterday. When listing only two things, only "and" is enough (although a comma can be used too). For example, I ate my meals and played the game yesterday.


1

At least according to Merriam-Webster, when can function in four different ways—and none of them is as a preposition. Also, it doesn't require verbs following it to take an -ing form. The following version of the example sentence would also be fine: When you study, don't talk to her. From Merriam-Webster: adverb 1 :at what time // when will you ...


1

But, in such constructions, does introduce a contrast. It introduces a contrast with a supposed idea that there is only that. Although the literal statement is negated ([there is] not only that), the negation implies the idea that someone believes or may believe that there is only that. The contrast is between what may have been thought or assumed (...


1

Yes, you can use "where" to introduce a clause. Example: I love to visit cities where there are museums. This means that you love to visit cities, but a condition of that is that the city must have a museum. Your example sentence doesn't seem like it needs a "where" clause - "You are a girl with tons of clothes, and some of them (do) matter". It seems ...


1

'But' is a conjunction that is used to introduce a statement or clause that will be in contrast or different from what has already been mentioned. 'And' is a conjunction that is used to connect statements or clauses that are similar. In your example, the conjunction 'but' would be better. The speaker is contrasting disciplining a preschooler with being ...


1

Well for a start it’s direct speech, so pretty much anything goes. But even given that, I’d say it’s perfectly fine. You could view it as a prematurely terminated list, where it’s being suggested that the speaker was planning to describe a four-item list: Okay, I am gonna look around, take a few statements, worry a few suspects and generally put the fear ...


1

The sentence is comprehensible as you have written it, but I would say that “They are British; so am I.” is more natural/strictly correct. If you want to use a comma rather than a semi-colon, “They are British, and so am I.” would work.


1

This is a very common structure: I am happy that you are happy I am sure that you are wrong I am skeptical that this is a good idea In US English, "that" is frequently omitted. In British English, "that" is much more common. I am happy you are unhappy [AmE] To British ears, it can sound ambiguous, and we might well say one of the following two: I am ...


1

Can I do the same reduction if I use just a conjunctive adverb in the sentence? Coordinating conjunctions differ from conjunctive adverbs. When you omit the subject and the auxiliary verb (be) you are using the parallelism; while the conjunctive adverbs should only exist in a complete sentence. 1a- Alexander II was an obscure commander, nevertheless ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible