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Different usage of "when"

"Do you remember when" can be used in different contexts to mean slightly different things. It could be used to invite someone to remember a specific occasion or a period of time. It doesn'...
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the usage of 'as' : as they consider different things they can pretend to do

Yes it means "because". "as" here is a conjunction: because; since Source
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1 vote

was not arrogant and

In your examples, was not modifies both arrogant and helpful. So, all of these mean that he was not helpful. The commas don't help here at all. You can avoid this easily by changing the construction. ...
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Which verbs are used with the conjuction "and" in my example sentence?

My English teacher from high school taught us the rules for this sort of sentence, and more to the point, told us why. I can no longer remember the precise "why", but the rule we learned was ...
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3 votes

They were married for 12 years before/when

Yes, they do mean the same thing. While they can be used interchangeably, the choice of conjunction may be influenced by what follows. They had been married for 12 years when they died in an accident. ...
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difference between "as" and "how" - wrong example in the Cambridge Dictionary?

It might be that how is being used as a short version of however, because: I dress however I want [please]. would be very common.
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difference between "as" and "how" - wrong example in the Cambridge Dictionary?

"I dress how I please" sounds colloquial to me, but not incorrect (in American English). CGEL p. 1077 gives "I don't like how it looks" as dialectal.
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Do you use “and” or “nor” when followed by a pronoun?

Both are correct, the presence of a pronoun is irrelevant. In the first list you have three categories who are not liable to claims: insurers Investors S. Corp and its owners. In the second case you ...
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