31

Be careful. Naive (adjective) or naivety (noun) carry more a sense of attitude than of experience. If you are naive, you tend to: believe everything you are told believe that people are good be easily tricked. Even if you were tricked many times and hence in theory are experienced Children are the standard example of naive. If you want to say ...


31

Yes. In spoken English, you can tell the connotation of "interesting" by the inflection used. If the word is distinctly separated from the rest of the sentence, there is a meaning often more important than that actual word. It is frequently a mild pejorative but you have to see and hear the speaker understand the context. When written, it would appear ...


29

If I am pardoned, I am no longer subject to the consequences of having been found guilty (e.g. of a crime). If I am forgiven, I am no longer the cause of negative emotions in the one who forgave me. You can say that pardoning is generally related to a change in punishment or consequences, while forgiving is generally related to a change in feelings or ...


21

It depends on the context. Pardon has multiple meanings, one of which is to "forgive" or "excuse". This is the definition used in simple expressions like "pardon me", or "I beg your pardon." Another more formal definition of "pardon" is to be legally forgiven for some kind of crime by an official state agency. Usually a pardon is only issued after the ...


21

The literal meaning "provocative" is just that the clothes try to "provoke" something. That doesn't have to be sexy feelings, it could be anger or any other strong emotion. A t-shirt with a political slogan might be provocative, for example. However, when applied to clothes then "provocative" does often mean "intended to arouse sexual desire", and so it is ...


18

They can be somewhat interchanged; that is, they have similar meanings that in some contexts are equivalent, but in others they have a different connotation. "living by himself" tends towards meaning without anyone in the same house. He finished college where he shared a small apartment with three guys and found a loft apartment just a few blocks from ...


17

Clever can have positive or negative overtones, but, more often than not, it's regarded as a positive term. (One exception is in the realm of writing software, where cleverness is not considered a virtue.) That said, I don't think I have ever seen the word used in association with weight loss, and I wouldn't recommend it in your sentence. If you're trying ...


17

"Interesting" can be used negatively if said sarcastically. In speech, at least, you'd usually be able to tell it was used sarcastically by a change of tone or through a pause: His delivery of the presentation was... interesting... This wouldn't necessarily mean his delivery was bad, it could just be odd – maybe he spoke with an unusual cadence, or ...


15

Inside may be used while describing position/location as opposed to outside. Example: The box is blue colored inside and black outside. Within may be used for time/space. Example: I'll reach there within ten minutes. Stay within the boundaries.


12

One difference of connotation, which I don't believe others have touched on, is how they convey the speaker's subjectivity towards the matter. If I say someone['s clothing] is provocative, it's a detached statement that I believe they're likely to arouse others. If I say someone['s clothing] is sexy, it's possibly a statement that I find them arousing, or ...


11

I think the connotation you are looking for really depends on the context of these sentences. Neither one has a strong enough connotation on its own to make the assumption you are about what it implies. For example, compare: He lives by himself now. He can do what he wants when he pleases. There is no one to tell him when to eat, when to sleep. For the ...


11

Civil discourse rests on the cooperative principle, and any response should rest on the assumption that your interlocutor is following that principle.† Whatever your private opinion, your public posture should be that an inappropriate or irrelevant Comment derives from a misunderstanding of your Question. And for that no one can be held responsible ...


10

To be honest, this is the first time I have ever heard of the word Lightninged. Neither the Oxford not the Cambridge dictionaries include it: Merriam-Webster does have it. The ELU link provides some evidence that the word exists, though the answerer makes it clear that he is from southern USA. This NGram gives a clear indication that its usage is pretty ...


10

"Creepy" is a word like "ugly". It is rude to use it to describe someone. Examples I watched a creepy film yesterday. Fine. A film can be creepy, that's not rude. I saw a creepy woman at the bus stop. Okay. Some people are creepy. But remember that the "creepy" woman is someone's daughter. This is not a "nice" thing to say. Sometimes it may be the ...


9

Naiveté is a result of inexperience; it is not inexperience per se. To be naive is to not know that one's knowledge and experience are insufficient in a given context. Therefore, it is impossible to say "I am naive". One can only say "I was naive." But one can say "I am inexperienced".


9

You're right, it can have negative/neutral connotation. I think I more relatable example would be when people try new foods from different cultures, like bugs. One might say I tried crickets yesterday. It was interesting. In text, the context suggests that "interesting" implies that the experience might have been unpleasant. When spoken, there is usually ...


9

pardoned has more of a legal meaning to be pardoned for a crime whereas forgiven has more of a moral meaning The shooter in North Carolina was forgiven by the families of the victims, but was not legally pardoned and still faces time in jail.


8

Like any two synonyms, there will be contexts where you can use either one, and there will be other contexts where most people would choose one word over the other. These two words are such general-purpose words (with some idiomatic usages as well) that I don't think we can begin to cover all the bases (that would not be within reason). That said, here is ...


8

"Mad" vs "crazy" brings in one of those numerous differences between U.S./American English and British English. Your meaning will be understood, but native speakers of different backgrounds may take a moment to process which word you use. "Mad", in British English, usually means "mentally ill". The phrase "he is quite mad" indicates a state of complete ...


8

It can only be used in a derogatory fashion, and I think the best way to demonstrate this is by comparing the definitions of "pedant" from a number of dictionaries: Merriam-Webster Simple Definition: A person who annoys other people by correcting small errors and giving too much attention to minor details. Full Definition: One who makes a ...


7

An in-depth answer to this question could probably fill a book; I'm just going to scratch the surface. As native speakers (of any language, certainly not just English) learn their language, they form an intricate network of associations with and between all of the words they know in their language. These associations become so ingrained in the native ...


7

The Wikipedia page you linked to explains this subtly, but rather well: When abbreviated as simply 'jack of all trades', it is ambiguous; the user's intention is then dependent on context. This means that the phrase jack of all trades (without the master of none) can be used in a complimentary or a disparaging fashion. Are you complimenting someone for ...


7

The word "interesting" can often be used to describe something that wasn't nice. I know several other answers seem to say that, but, in my opinion, they tend to be describing (slightly, or very) different reasons why. Let me show you an example of why "interesting" has often become a bit of a negative word. A parent says to a child: Did you like the ...


7

Easy to read, pronounce and remember Names of products don't need to be "real words" - it is perfectly okay for them to be real words, portmanteaus, made up words, spelling variations of real worlds or random characters. However, they do need to be usable in practice when mentioning your product in speech and writing. Will people be able to write down the ...


7

"Lightninged" has a few problems with it: The "inged" at the end makes it look (at a glance) like it should rhyme with "unhinged" which is not correct. Stumbling block #1. The pronunciation is tiring on the mouth; the tongue must first be at the front for the 'tn', then in the back of the mouth for the 'ng', then return to the front for 'ed'. It's ...


6

In US usage, mad is colloquially used for 'insane' mostly in established compounds like madhouse and madman, and in proverbial phrases like mad as a hatter and mad as a March hare. Its primary sense is 'angry', as in your example (which, however, should be mad at her). It is not so strong as angry: it's usually used to express milder or temporary 'annoyance'....


6

Winston is insulted because Terry has in effect said that that as a gay man he's not suited to his violent profession. He rejects the implication by sarcastically instancing 'interior decorator' as the sort of profession which her stereotype regards as suitable to gay men.


6

Let me improve the answer given by user18593 Checking Oxford Dictionary, you can find concede Admit or agree that something is true after first denying or resisting it. Origin: Late 15th century: from French concéder or Latin concedere, from con- ‘completely’ + cedere ‘yield’. admit Confess to be true or to be the case Origin: Late ...


5

Even though we call two words "synonyms", it is rare for two words to mean EXACTLY the same thing. Words have "connotations" -- subtle differences in meaning. An example of this that I remember from 30-something years ago: When I was in high school we saw a movie about industrial robots made by a Japanese company. They had some awkward points in translating ...


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