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43

You may pronounce it with a stopped /d/ or without it—/frɛndz/ or frɛnz/—in practice, nobody will notice.


15

Not much of a transition needed. Compare with the word cards, it does not become cars. If your native language does not have that 'ds' sound/transition, I can understand that it might be hard for you to pronounce it. In that case you can get away with frɛnz just make sure you get that z-sound. You could maybe get away with frɛntz if you say it fast but ...


9

The "th" sound is one of the most difficult phonemes in English for non-native speakers, as many other languages don't have such a sound. It's quite possible that there is nothing wrong with your hearing, but rather your interlocutor isn't able to pronounce "months" correctly. In that case, rely on context cues as @Mark suggests. As with other countable ...


9

The s on the end can be difficult to hear, but both words are usually paired with a determiner: I'll go in a month I'll go in a few months I'll go in one month I'll go in two months The word month always needs to be used with a determiner, such as "a month" or "one month". The word months is different because it doesn't always have to ...


8

TL;DR Replace the affricate [d͡ʒ] of 'changed' by [ʒ] and pronounce it [t͡ʃeɪnʒd]. [ʒ] is the sound at the end of the word garage, so it should be easier for you. Explanation English consonant clusters are usually difficult for learners and in [t͡ʃeɪnd͡ʒd] 'changed', we have a cluster of three consonants, including the affricate [d͡ʒ], which is a complex ...


8

Try pronouncing two words, first "change" and then "do", with a little pause. Then practice saying them with a smaller and smaller pause, until you are saying "changedo". Then drop the "o".


5

Here are my thoughts as an American English speaker; I don't have references for this so some of it may be wrong. The pronunciation that sounds most natural to me is [mɛɾɚ], with /h/ omitted and the /t/ flapped and voiced. I would not be surprised to hear [mɛʔt̚hɚ] in slower or more deliberate speech. By [ʔt̚], I mean to indicate an unreleased voiceless ...


5

The ds at the end becomes a z sounds, like zoo


4

English speakers regularly simplify certain clusters in English. This is usually not random, but relies on various rules in the language. In particular: the cluster /ndz/ as found in sounds, finds, pounds, friends, grinds and so forth can be reduced to /nz/: /saʊnz, faɪnz, paʊnz, frenz, graɪnz/ Clusters with the 'th' sounds /θ/ or /ð/ very often get ...


4

This is normal, not peculiar to Ms. Swift. In speech th- is often assimilated to an immediately preceding continuant, not only with that but at the onset of any unstressed function word such as the, this, they, them.


3

Yes, /dz/ and /z/ sound very different to native speakers, and when pronounced properly are clearly distinguishable. It is actually far more common for /dz/ and /ts/ to be confused by non-native speakers, but even these are distinct. As to how they should be pronounced - you should pronounce them as per pronunciation guides! Some sounds in any language can ...


2

It is pronounced with the affricate [d͡z]. A good way of thinking of it is as the "j" sound /d͡ʒ/ but with your tongue at the location of /d/, either touching the back of your teeth or closely behind them. Also, make sure to only touch the roof of your mouth with the tip of your tongue.


2

There appear to be two separate questions: Which one is correct? How can I distinguish between them? Both pronunciations are correct, but they each represent a different accent. The American pronunciation is /tʃɹ/, as in the first video. The second video features an Australian speaker, thus the pure /tr/ sound. Assuming you are not a native speaker of ...


2

The final -ed would be either omitted or reduced to a vestigial -t in normal speech. The elision between the /z/ and the /s/ can clearly be seen in this spectrum, where the vestigial t can (believe it or not) still be heard. I believe that the technical term for this is an unreleased consonant: you can find more about it here. In normal speech, the word is ...


2

In friends, most if not all native English speakers definitely have a /d/ sound. It's just that the /d/ is unreleased ([d̚]), so it's barely perceptible. Unreleased means that the airflow blocked for the /d/ at the alveolar ridge remains there and is not released like a normal /d/. So you hear frenz.


1

The presence or absence of an apostrophe makes no difference. When I say 'th', my tongue is curled up at the sides. To change the sound to 's' I simply flatten it.


1

In cases "3" the context of pronunciation is that of double consonant sounds, in particular that of double plosives; the key to the pronunciation is given in Longman Pronunciation dictionary, p. 238. Double consonant sounds ('geminates') are found in English only across grammatical boundaries: where two words occur next to one another in connected ...


1

English consonant clusters can be difficult-to-pronounce at times,... The -ed is pronounced /t/ in this case. I've expounded on the pronunciations of the -ed endings in this answer Now, there are four consonants in a row in bu[nt͡ʃt.t]ogether, including the problematic /t͡ʃ/. The simple trick is to omit the -ed: bu[nt͡ʃ.t]ogether That's how most native ...


1

This is very accent specific and there's no real "wrong" way within the following z - the D is softened to the point that the ds becomes a Z sound Dz - the D is slightly softened, but the D is still pronounced. The S becomes a Z sound Dss/tss - the S becomes almost a hiss, with the D remaining fairly sharp and the D almost resembling a T ss - as above, the ...


1

In the Midwestern American dialect, months is often pronounced "mons" (i.e. məns or monce), emphasizing the "s" sound and virtually ignoring the "th" sound. But honestly it virtually never matters. If the number of months is important, then it will be specified with another word indicating the number (e.g. "a", "single", "one", "two", "few", "many"). Using ...


1

"Funs" is an verb form, likely infrequently used: He funs around every weekend. So it would be grammatically incorrect there and also makes no sense in the context. What I hear is the "d" covered over by the end of the "n" and the beginning of the "s". (Perhaps partly due to the speakers Aussie accent.) As far as the sound difference, it depends ...


1

In English, if a voiced consonant occurs at the end of a syllable, Any other consonant in the same cluster is voiced (hence, /ridz/) The preceding vowel gets lengthened. To many listeners, the length distinction is more important than the voicing distinction. So my practical advice, if you find /dz/ hard, is to exaggerate the vowel length when you ...


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