9

The "th" sound is one of the most difficult phonemes in English for non-native speakers, as many other languages don't have such a sound. It's quite possible that there is nothing wrong with your hearing, but rather your interlocutor isn't able to pronounce "months" correctly. In that case, rely on context cues as @Mark suggests. As with other countable ...


9

The s on the end can be difficult to hear, but both words are usually paired with a determiner: I'll go in a month I'll go in a few months I'll go in one month I'll go in two months The word month always needs to be used with a determiner, such as "a month" or "one month". The word months is different because it doesn't always have to have ...


5

English speakers regularly simplify certain clusters in English. This is usually not random, but relies on various rules in the language. In particular: the cluster /ndz/ as found in sounds, finds, pounds, friends, grinds and so forth can be reduced to /nz/: /saʊnz, faɪnz, paʊnz, frenz, graɪnz/ Clusters with the 'th' sounds /θ/ or /ð/ very often get ...


5

Consonant clusters like this are not all that comfortable for native English speakers either. Carefully pronouncing all the consonants is more work than it's worth, and actually sounds unnatural. Usually there is some degree of elision. Each speaker evolves a personal, 'idiolectal' approach; but there are a couple of general tendencies which make these word-...


5

Here are my thoughts as an American English speaker; I don't have references for this so some of it may be wrong. The pronunciation that sounds most natural to me is [mɛɾɚ], with /h/ omitted and the /t/ flapped and voiced. I would not be surprised to hear [mɛʔt̚hɚ] in slower or more deliberate speech. By [ʔt̚], I mean to indicate an unreleased voiceless ...


4

This is normal, not peculiar to Ms. Swift. In speech th- is often assimilated to an immediately preceding continuant, not only with that but at the onset of any unstressed function word such as the, this, they, them.


4

Cool question. I'll say this: in words like tuft, loft, lift and raft, the t is usually rather pronounced; however, when you add an s, it is rather difficult (even for native speakers) to enunciate all three consonants, so the t is often barely audible. When spoken, these words often sound like homophones (or near-homophones) to tuffs, loffs, liffs, and ...


2

There appear to be two separate questions: Which one is correct? How can I distinguish between them? Both pronunciations are correct, but they each represent a different accent. The American pronunciation is /tʃɹ/, as in the first video. The second video features an Australian speaker, thus the pure /tr/ sound. Assuming you are not a native speaker of ...


2

The final -ed would be either omitted or reduced to a vestigial -t in normal speech. The elision between the /z/ and the /s/ can clearly be seen in this spectrum, where the vestigial t can (believe it or not) still be heard. I believe that the technical term for this is an unreleased consonant: you can find more about it here. In normal speech, the word is ...


1

In the Midwestern American dialect, months is often pronounced "mons" (i.e. məns or monce), emphasizing the "s" sound and virtually ignoring the "th" sound. But honestly it virtually never matters. If the number of months is important, then it will be specified with another word indicating the number (e.g. "a", "single", "one", "two", "few", "many"). Using ...


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