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1

Oral and nasal consonants [p b t d k g] are oral stops (or plosives), meaning the air is blocked at a particular place of articulation, accompanied by sudden release of the air through the mouth. [m n ŋ] are, by contrast, nasal stops i.e. a closure is made in the oral cavity at a particular place of articulation to stop the air from escaping through the ...


2

You probably heard it correctly. The second syllable of 'pronunciation' ends with a nasal and the next syllable starts with a fricative /s/, so Anglophones are likely to insert an epenthetic /t/ in that position. I have explained Epenthesis in this answer, but I'll repeat it. Epenthesis happens for a variety of reasons such as ease of articulation, avoiding ...


1

Tricky one! Phonetically, the difference between tsee and see (in my native English accent at least) is that see is pronounced with entirely parted teeth, whereas with tsee you touch the underside/back of your upper front teeth with your tongue. The catch with the word "pronunciation" is that the end of "nun" also requires that same ...


0

In most American accents, when a stressed syllable ends in an /n/ and the next unstressed syllable starts with a /t/, the /t/ is usually dropped. So 'COUNter' becomes counner, ˈTWEN.ty' becomes twenni, ˈWAN.ted' becomes wannid etc. I think the same happens to a /d/ in that position. The third syllable in 'in.de.PEN.dent' is stressed and it ends in an /n/, ...


3

They are different words spelled differently with different meanings. Hence they are pronounced differently.


21

𝑇𝐿;𝐷𝑅 'Lose' came from Old English (OE) word losian while 'loose' was taken from Old Norse around the thirteenth century. There was a process in OE through which s, f and th became voiced respectively to [z], [v] and [ð] when they occurred between voiced sounds i.e. between two vowels or a vowel and anther voiced sound. There was no phonemic contrast of ...


10

"Loose" has probably always been pronounced with [s] - the Norse word that it was borrowed from is spelt with double "s". "Lose" has been pronounced with [z] at least since Old English. (Between vowels, OE "s" was pronounced [z]. I use square brackets here because the s/z distinction in OE wasn't phonemically ...


1

English consonant clusters can be difficult-to-pronounce at times,... The -ed is pronounced /t/ in this case. I've expounded on the pronunciations of the -ed endings in this answer Now, there are four consonants in a row in bu[nt͡ʃt.t]ogether, including the problematic /t͡ʃ/. The simple trick is to omit the -ed: bu[nt͡ʃ.t]ogether That's how most native ...


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