5

Like words, grammatical constructions often have overlapping meaning -synonymy- in some contexts but entirely different meanings in others. In this particular context there is no significant difference between the constructions. Both contrast with the "simple future" I will see Jim tomorrow. The simple construction announces an intention of meeting, the two ...


5

Do you come? is an incomplete question which would lead the listener to wonder "Do you come what?" Do you come here often? would be a more complete question. Are you coming? is a complete question asking whether someone will join you in your travels. The same applies in your next two sentences Are you coming with me? (correct) Do you come ...


4

The sentence you show could be correct in another context, but not in this one, which is reported elsewhere (with a slight and immaterial difference): HANI: He was in the room because I put him there. I'm just sorry I wasn't there a few minutes sooner. ROGER: Alright, what would have happened if you were a few minutes later, huh? Clearly 'Roger' is ...


4

As Damkerng T (citing snailboat) points out, participles do not express tense. They may express ‘voice’, agency/patiency: the -ing form may in some contexts be characterized as an active participle and the -en form as a passive participle. They may also express (or at least reflect) aspect; but what aspect they express depends on the complicated interaction ...


3

By convention English narrative almost always uses the past tense. While the story is about something that has completed, the story itself is being told in the moment, and so we think of it as ongoing action. Mary was making breakfast when the spaceship landed in her backyard. "That's odd," she thought. "You would expect aliens from another planet to be ...


3

Please note that this is not a shining example of English writing and the text may not be a very clear expression of what the writer intended. Having said that, if you do want to analyse it in detail, you need to treat it as an example of reported speech, where Chris Bell actually said I am having trouble finding the right packaging - present continuous ...


2

There is a better way of writing it. Present Progressive has several usages, including: 1) to describe an action starting in the past and continuing to this time. e.g. "I'm busy right now. I'm doing my homework." e.g. "I'm reading a great book." 2) to describe a future arrangement e.g. "I'm having lunch with the chairman this afternoon." 3) It can be ...


2

Many Americans and some British English speakers find the use of liking here acceptable. This is presumably due to high levels of immigration into the USA and the difficulty immigrants have learning to contrast simple and continuous tenses. This tense 'misuse' is then spread to other countries such as the UK through TV and films. There are times when the ...


2

Your sentence 1 uses the Present Perfect Progressive. This tense is used to describe an action that was started in the past and either has just stopped or continues at the moment. Sentence 2 uses the Present Continous. This tense is used to describe actions that are taking place now, at this exact moment (in our case), or will take place in the future. ...


2

The word "conjunct" is not commonly used as a verb if it can be at all. I would recommend a more common term like "concatenate." The way I would change your sentence to use "concatenate" is as follows: I will display the the Employee Code and Employee name by concatenating them with a hypen. (e.g. EMPCODE-EMPLOYEENAME). Better yet, simplify the sentence ...


2

A couple of examples to show that "logical" past/ongoing isn't always directly reflected by verb tense... The Japanese are a long-lived race Bamboo is a fast-growing plant I don't think we can really call award-winning, fast-growing, etc. "gerunds" (they're not "nouns" in any meaningful sense), but I don't know what to call them apart from "verb-...


2

I believe you will find the nuance expressed by the progressive here addressed at this question: where the simple construction asserts the fact of the action, the progressive ascribes a character or quality to it. This use is typically found in contrastive situations like that in your example, where the speaker/writer is concerned to draw a distinction ...


2

As the others have said: I might work more this week. Implies that you have some sort of control over the situation, whereas I might be working more this week. Implies that you don't really have the choice. can't i say : "There is traffic on the highway so i might arrive late." Yes you can. And the reason this shows that you don't have control ...


2

Both sentences are correct: She has been living in Liverpool all her life. She has lived in Liverpool all her life. The difference between these two is where you the speaker wish to place your focus: With has been living in the first sentence, the focus is to show an uninterrupted activity starting in the past and continuing up to the present. With has ...


2

You can use an infinitive with or without to, not the -ing form, after the construction all + subject + verb + be. However, the infinitive without "to" is more common. All they do is (to) get groceries.


2

As mentioned, watch you doing is not the present continuous form but doing is a gerund and in the same way,watch you do is not the present simple form but do is a bare infinitive. Both choices are correct depending on what you want to say. "I want to watch you wash the car" means that I want to see the action (washing the car) completed. 2."I want to watch ...


2

Yes, there are differences. How they differ really depends on the context, but I will give some examples to clarify. (Unlike some languages, English isn't as strict about whether a tense grammatically indicates a specific aspect, nor whether a verb lexically does so. This complicates things by giving us more possibilities.) "I was supposed to play." ...


2

I was supposed to play. I was supposed to be playing. WikiDiff.Com says that "to play" mostly means: "To act in a manner such that one has fun; to engage in activities expressly for the purpose of recreation or entertainment." LearnEnglish-Online.com says that: It is better to use a gerund as the subject of the sentence. An infinitive is very ...


2

I think the specific thing stopping you from saying "has been staying" is not "already" but rather "this week." "Three days this week" is a specific amount of time in the past, and you can't be staying (currently) at a time in the past. Because of that, we say "stayed." Now, if the sentence were a bit more generic, then you could potentially use "has been ...


2

The number of people involved is not relevant. You can say "I am working tomorrow", "I am going to France in January", "I am visiting my mother on Saturday", etc.


2

When the teacher entered, the boys were all looking out the window. The teacher's enterance interrupts the boys action of looking out the window. They were already doing it when the teacher entered. When the teacher entered, the boys all looked out the window. The teacher entered and then the boys looked out the window (but they were not looking before ...


2

Both present continuous and present perfect continuous can be used for a temporary habit. Present continuous is used with presently, at the moment, these days. Present perfect continuous is used with recently and lately. In this context you can use either. If you add a duration, you can only use present perfect continuous.


2

You are mostly right. The first sentence means that, as of now, interviews of two people are completed (and this specifically refers to this week, so the interviews took place between the beginning of the week and now). It suggests that interviewing may continue in the remainder of the week. The second sentence means that the interviews are ongoing, and ...


1

If you say: I do not agree with Hitler You are saying generally, that in terms of your politics and opinions you and Hitler do not see eye to eye If you say: I am not agreeing with Hitler when describing his opinion You are indicating, specifically, that in the process of describing his opinions about the Jews, you are not agreeing with said views, ...


1

You have to be careful not to confuse the gerund form of verbs, which act like nouns and are not meant to describe ongoing action. "Washing the car" for example, is a gerund and not a present continuous verb: On Saturdays, my favorite pastime is [washing the car][eating pizza][playing sports][watching television][etc.] In the evening he likes ...


1

I think you could say either "What were you doing last week?" or "What had you been doing in the last week?" To be more polite, you could say: By the way, what were you doing last week? By the way, what had you been doing in the last week? May I ask you/Could you tell me what you were doing last week/what you had been doing in the last week?


1

I agree with those in the comments, that using "What [were you]/[have you been] doing?" is much more likely to be interpreted by the recipient as rude, or at least intrusive. I can't think of a situation in which I would use either of these phrases unless I was essentially accusing someone of doing something they shouldn't have been. If I'm interested in ...


1

In the examples given, only the present perfect continuous form is correct. That is, with the ongoing temporal specification, the correct form is: Subject + has/have been + verb+ing + ongoing temporal specification I have been waiting since 8 o'clock. I have been waiting for 20 minutes. She has been there since this morning. Thus: That is what ...


1

The question is rather confused. You mention do/be, continuous, passive and the "is to be doing" form . First, "be" is not a continuous form of "do". They are quite separate verbs. However, "be" does form the continuous tense "be playing", for example. The continuous form is acceptable; however, it is not normally required: The simple infinitive carries ...


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