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50

An acceptable, if somewhat archaic, contraction would be 'tisn't https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%27tisn%27t


44

Yes, let's is indeed simply a contraction of let us, and that means that whenever you can use let's, you can use let us. But that is not the whole story! The expression let's (or let us when used in the same way) is idiomatic; it means something different than you would think by just looking at the dictionary definition of let. You correctly mentioned ...


36

Only unstressed auxiliaries can be contracted. But when an auxiliary is used by itself to 'code' (stand for) the longer verb phrase it introduces, it is always stressed.         Will you be at the party this Friday? right! I will be at the party. Consequently, an auxiliary used this way cannot be contracted. &...


31

We can say things like: Don't ever text while driving. Don't ever do such a foolish and dangerous thing! Never text while driving. Never do such a foolish and dangerous thing! But we don't say "Do never do such a thing".unidiomatic P.S. In contemporary English, the do never {verb} construction is either a formulaic literary holdover from the 17th ...


26

No, double or multiple contractions are not formal. While some style guides support the moderate use of common contractions, even single contractions are sometimes discouraged in formal writing. See MLA style on contractions and this roundup of views on contractions. Edit to address some of the points in the comments: In formal writing, it is appropriate ...


23

It normally means "her", but often in terms of an inanimate object like a car or a boat. I guess the quote is treating your brain as the 'inanimate object', just stretching the metaphor a bit. To "patch something up" is to make running repairs, rather than take it to the garage/dry dock/... doctor ;) & get your car/boat/brain back into working order ...


22

Here's an edited version of a post I did for ELU on a similar question (which got closed): The existential construction takes there as a subject. There has no meaning, and often the verb takes its agreement from the complement of the verb BE. So if the Noun Phrase after BE is plural, the verb will usually be in a plural form. If the Noun Phrase is singular ...


22

It is a contraction of her, found in some regional accents. Dropping h's is a feature of a few different regional accents and dialects, and while people who speak that way will endeavor to spell words correctly when writing, authors will sometimes try and imitate the way a person speaks when writing dialogue so that the reader can imagine their accent, ...


21

Spec is shorthand for specifications which are written descriptions for how an instrument or piece of equipment is used. In your example, a non spec'd value is a value which falls outside the normal operating range as described in its specification. If the value is too high the chip will burn out, or the equipment will fail.


18

It stands for "has", but the full form is less likely because if you were writing formally (avoiding contractions) you would probably pay attention to the agreement. Colloquially: "There's got to be some." Somewhat more formally: "There have got to be some." (Formally: "There have to be some.") "There've got to be some" is less commonly seen and may ...


17

Although -n't was originally a clitic, a reduced form of not, in Present-Day English it has become an inflectional suffix that attaches to auxiliary verbs. In other words, the negative auxiliary weren't is a single word, and it undergoes subject–auxiliary inversion like any other auxiliary: 1a. You weren't able to log into your online account. 1b....


16

In special cases, such as when forming a plural of a word that is not normally a noun, some writers add an apostrophe for clarity. Example: Here are some do's and don'ts. In that sentence, the verb do is used as a plural noun, and the apostrophe was added because the writer felt that dos was confusing. Not all writers agree; some see no problem ...


14

From The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, p.1614: Prepositions, auxiliaries, and infinitival to are stressed when they are the sole or final element in a phrase-level constituent, a PP or VP [preposition phrase or verb phrase]. Note that be is always an auxiliary verb. In your example, is is an auxiliary at the end of a verb phrase: 1a. If ...


14

Both are not quite right. "It would be better" is how you would phrase a declarative sentence - a statement of fact. To ask a question, start with the question word ("Would it be better...?"). This makes the whole question of the contraction unnecessary :) But if you still want to know a bit about "it would" read on: 1) The correct contraction for "it ...


14

The word spec is often used in place of specifications, and spec'd is sometimes used to mean, "to provide specifications for", essentially, specified. From the context you provided, it appears to be referring to the input voltage exceeding that for which a real "chip" would be rated.


13

The basic (declarative) sentence is: He does not know. You can turn this into an interrogative clause with subject-auxiliary inversion. Just switch he and does: Does he not know? You can optionally replace does not with doesn't in the original sentence, using the suffix -n't rather than the word not: He doesn't know. Now the auxiliary is the ...


13

The contraction of "is" in "it's" can only occur if the "is" is relatively unstressed, which cannot be the case when it is final in a sentence or clause. Consequently, contractions like "it's" and "I'm" never occur at the end - they are always expanded, so that some stress can go on the verb "is" or "am". This is very noticeable when a lyricist ...


13

never and not ever are almost equivalent, but there are some restrictions on the use of the latter. As for do never, in this context it's an oxymoron- two words used together that have, or seem to have, opposite meanings. do 3.1 is a positive imperative (albeit quite a polite one): it tells you that you must do the main verb, whereas never is a negative ...


13

You are asking if it is acceptable to write: No, it'sn't The answer is: no, it is not acceptable. A contraction is normally (and traditionally) of two words, not three. So when you intend to say "it is not" you can either contract "it is" to "it's", or "is not" to "isn't". Exceptions to this would fall under the description of nonstandard, colloquial ...


12

Ending a sentence with a contraction is entirely valid in normal English. I tried to force myself to eat the last bite of cheesecake, but I just couldn't. Oh, go on. I'll eat this whole chocolate bar, even though I know I shouldn't. No, really. I mustn't. Really. Don't do it. Just don't. Put a spider in her bed when she's sleeping? You ...


12

"Gonna" is an informal contraction of "going to". It's used in informal speech. While informal writing is, well, informal (and thus the rules are loosely defined), I've never seen "gonna" in writing, except in SMSspeak. And, of course, in written dialogues in novels/etc. So, while there's nothing stopping you from using it wherever you want, I suggest you ...


12

Gonna is informal; you can use it in written English, but it is not normally used in business English.


12

There's a sofa, two armchairs, a TV and a big cage for our parrots. This is correct. There's is a contraction and can mean there is, there has or there are. In this case, it stands for there are. As Snailplane mentions, the there are case has become standard in modern informal English, despite the fact that apostrophe-s isn't a sensible contraction for are....


12

You understand the forms in colloquial use pretty much correctly. Let's VERB is used to propose or encourage the action of VERB by the speaker and her hearers. Let here is a (now mostly obsolete) subjunctive use of the plain form. It's getting late. Let's go! Let us VERB is ordinarily used to request or demand permission for the speaker and her ...


11

It's not as unusual as you think, and it's not even very awkward to say (at least to me, being a native English speaker). It is indeed contracted just like that, "where're." "Where're you going?" is probably the most common usage. Remember contractions are always considered at least a little informal, so don't say this if you're trying to deliver grave ...


11

The [sic] is just wrong. Ultimately, whoever wrote this seems to just not know what he's talking about. "We got" is incorrect, so [sic] after both instances of that would make sense. Others have pointed out that 93 is the incorrect age, so [sic] after 93 would make sense, too. "Are of 60 years old" is incorrect, so [sic] after "of" would make sense. In ...


10

You can only contract did (or any other word, for that matter) when it is unstressed. You cannot, for instance, contract "I did know it", because did is only used there to give emphasis to your assertion that you knew it: "I did know it". And you can't contract did when it is the main verb of an indicative sentence, or (as David Schwartz points out) the '...


10

Both sentences sound fine to me, but I'd read them with different emphasis and meaning: If it's not a great holiday, then what is (a great holiday)? If it's not a great holiday, then what is it? The first sentence is a rhetorical device. The implication is that if you don't consider it a great holiday, then you probably shouldn't consider anything a great ...


10

In formal speech and writing, only there are is standard English in such cases. However, in an informal style, here's, there's and where's are common with plural nouns (Michael Swan, 2005.532, Practical English Usage).


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