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28 votes

How to address a woman in a letter?

Use Ms., not Ms./Miss The "Ms." abbreviation was created in large part to avoid the awkwardness of using Mrs./Miss. I can't speak for all of the English-speaking world, but, in the U.S., Ms. has ...
J.R.'s user avatar
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21 votes
Accepted

Is it okay to start a letter with "Dear <name>" followed by "Hi, <name>"?

I agree with you: "Dear Bob" followed by "Hi, Bob" is redundant. Avoid that as best you can. The best way to start a letter or email really depends on how close you are to the recipient. For instance, ...
Phlebas's user avatar
  • 361
19 votes

Is it okay to start a letter with "Dear <name>" followed by "Hi, <name>"?

"Dear Bob" is just letter-writing language for "Hi, Bob" so including both of them is redundant. If you're writing a formal letter, saying "Dear Bob" has already said hello, so you don't need to do it ...
David Richerby's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Writing a letter to two persons who are not a couple or married?

First of all, please note that the usage "Mr. Firstname" or "Miss Firstname", as in your example, are conventional only in specific subcultures of English speakers; I encountered it for the first time ...
Codeswitcher's user avatar
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9 votes
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Postscripts – before or after the signature?

A postscript originated from postscriptum(Latin) meaning post(after) +scriptum*, the past participle of scribere(to write). It is an additional remark at the end of the letter after the signature ...
V.V.'s user avatar
  • 7,115
7 votes

A formal way to request for updated information in business email writing

I do agree with the answer from Mowser, 'updated' would generally work. But something more natural would be 'new.' Is there any new information? May I know if there is any new information? ...
Zach Zundel's user avatar
7 votes

Writing a letter to two persons who are not a couple or married?

What sounds normal depends on the culture of your boss and your "senior", your company, and other factors. One safe choice in most business situations around the world would be: Dear John Wu and ...
Jim Reynolds's user avatar
  • 9,997
5 votes

Postscripts – before or after the signature?

A postscript is a passage at the end of a letter, following the signature. It only makes sense in the context of a letter composed by hand or on a typewriter, to accommodate an afterthought when you ...
Chuma Umenze's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Kindly for closing email!

I suppose it could work, but it sounds strange and I wouldn't recommend it. If you want to use the word "kind", then consider these: Kind regards/wishes, John.
Dr Sitecore's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What's the grammar of "Attached" in this email?

Attached you will find the document "How to fill out the online application". Yes, it is a past-participle. "Attached" is a preposed adjunct of place for it tells you where you will find the document....
BillJ's user avatar
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3 votes
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Finishing a letter

I would suggest "I look forward to hearing from you soon." "Receiving your feedback" implies that you are looking for, well, feedback. This is typically what you receive when you are declined and the ...
EnglishTeacherEric's user avatar
2 votes

Writing a letter to two persons who are not a couple or married?

It sounds normal, however usually, the woman's name is used first Dear Mrs. Jane and Mr. John (like holding the door open...) at least that's what I was taught. In the case of emails, I did work ...
Peter's user avatar
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2 votes

A formal way to request for updated information in business email writing

How in the world can one possibly answer this question without more context? Can you pull the information you currently have from a database and stick it in a mail merge? For example, if I sent a ...
joiedevivre's user avatar
  • 4,660
2 votes

Writing a letter to two persons who are not a couple or married?

It depends on the communications culture in your business. I work for a large multi-national but we have a 'first names' culture. Even when writing to my CEO I use their first name. When I need to ...
CJC's user avatar
  • 129
2 votes

Is it okay to start a letter with "Dear <name>" followed by "Hi, <name>"?

"Dear Bob" is a greeting. It's a standard part of a letter, but it does not necessarily require the word "dear". In fact, "Hi, Bob" would itself be a perfectly acceptable greeting, provided that the ...
Kyle Strand's user avatar
2 votes

The usage of commas when writing an address

Traditional British usage was to add a comma at the end of each line (except the last, which sometimes had a full stop) and indent each successive line. A comma was also often added between the house ...
rjpond's user avatar
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2 votes
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Closing a message as a team representative

Either one is fine, as long as it means what you intend. When someone says, "for the team", it is understood to mean that everyone on the team knows about and agrees with what you have written, and ...
Gabriel Luci's user avatar
  • 2,157
1 vote

"Noted. Thank you" as an answer to a letter informing about task completion? I mean office correspondence

Brevity in writing can be mistaken as impolite because there is not enough material to determine tone, so the reader can find a tone (based on their expectations or personal biases) that is different ...
StephenS's user avatar
  • 8,139
1 vote

How to address a woman in a letter?

Possible forms of address in a formal letter: Dear Mrs. Smith [if the person goes by that and if you know she does; usually an older generation woman, where she is used to: Mr and Mrs Smith on ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.4k
1 vote
Accepted

How to write the address of a house that consists of several numbered buildings

If we are to go the correct way (as given in different source like Linguistic Services Inc.) then it should be either: 107076, Moscow, ul. Korolenko, d. 2, str. 6 House 2, Building 6, Korolenko st., ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
1 vote

Is it okay to start a letter with "Dear <name>" followed by "Hi, <name>"?

"Dear Mr. Jones" is a formal opening, so people sometimes begin the body with "Hi" to transition to a friendlier tone. "Dear Bob" is informal, so "Hi" would stand out as redundant. However, it would ...
fixer1234's user avatar
  • 5,706
1 vote

Is it okay to start a letter with "Dear <name>" followed by "Hi, <name>"?

If it is an email, you address the person as you would in person. Their email goes directly to them in most cases. If it goes to the department first, slightly more formality may be warranted. If it ...
WRX's user avatar
  • 4,675
1 vote

Is it okay to start a letter with "Dear <name>" followed by "Hi, <name>"?

Using the name twice is redundant. I would suggest: Dear Bob, Hi, this is soandso.
user51358's user avatar
1 vote

What's the grammar of "Attached" in this email?

You will find attached herewith (or direct object) Please find attached herewith (or direct object) Attached you will find herewith (or direct object) are set expressions used in business (even ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.4k
1 vote

"Is that ok?" formal letter

No, do not use "ok" in any formal letter. You can use it on an email, to a friend or relative, however if you are writing a formal letter, you need to avoid using slogans, etc.
Jess Miller's user avatar
1 vote

"Is that ok?" formal letter

"Is that ok"? Probably not. You might want to ask May I submit a partial academic record?
Em.'s user avatar
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