75

It's domain specific, and not something that would be said outside the context of a game like this. It's almost certainly an elided form of the following: Deal 6 points of damage. (And damage here is a mass noun.) In the same way that headlines take liberties with the omission of articles and other grammatical structures, so too is this game using a ...


34

Some people confuse the terms collective noun with mass noun or uncountable noun. As a simple, relatable example, herd is a countable, collective noun. You can have one herd or multiple herds, even though a single herd is composed of multiple members. Twenty cows are crossing the road. A herd of cows is crossing the road. Three herds of cows are ...


33

Generically, because it's established gaming jargon. While the answer by Jason Bassford is almost certainly correct about the origins of this particular bit of jargon, it's gotten to the point now that it's just accepted jargon, so it's what almost everybody uses. In a number of cases, the jargon for a particular domain is essentially a distinct ...


32

Depending on the context, it could be fine or improper. If you are at a fast food that has condiments in small packets, then "a ketchup" is fine as the "packet" is implied. For example: Can I have a ketchup and a couple of mustards for my burger? This sounds fine (at least in AE) However, if you are at someone's house and the ketchup is in a bottle, ...


30

"Money" is uncountable, so the correct sentence is: "We should spend more money on education and health and less on new technology."


29

Some words and phrases in English can be either countable or uncountable. The difference in meaning between the two is often subtle. Sometimes the difference can shift us from a general concept to a specific. Like, "He drank water." He consumed a liquid and that liquid was water. "He drank a water." Now we're saying that he drink one of something. Probably ...


29

Staff is a collective noun, so when you are talking about individuals within the staff, you would say something like 2 staff members A sentence like the following is also possible. Two members of staff will join this month. I believe that's the uncountable usage you are referring to. But when you are talking about multiple collections, you can ...


26

If you're referring to the idea in general, it's not countable. There's nothing to count. "Someone who practices magic", "friendship is magic", or "magic powers this device" would all fit this pattern. However, if you're referring to some specific kind, it's countable. So "the magics of necromancy and enchantment" is legitimate: it's referring to two ...


22

"60 seconds" is the amount of time, so by saying "60 seconds or less" you basically say "in less amount of time than 60 seconds." According to Lexico, less is also used with numbers when they are on their own and with expressions of measurement or time, e.g.: His weight fell from 18 stone to less than 12. Their marriage lasted less than two years. ...


20

Information is a non-countable noun (you can't have 4 informations), so it is neither singular nor plural. The correct usage is "information" without the 's'. More info here: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/117552/why-does-information-not-have-a-plural-form So actually, neither one of your sentences is correct. You can't have two informations; ...


20

Two of your sentences are correct. There has been some rapid progress. This is correct, because "progress" is an uncountable noun (ie. nouns that we can't count, so don't have different plural forms); therefore, it can only take a singular verb. There have been some rapid developments. This is correct, because "developments" is in the plural form; ...


18

In American and British English, this use of "traffic" implies "heavy traffic". A "traffic jam" is a kind of very "heavy traffic" that moves very slowly. Notice that this meaning of "traffic" does not need a determiner, but this meaning of "traffic jam" usually either needs a determiner, or needs to be plural. "I got stuck in traffic" has a similar ...


17

I'm not going to tell you in absolute terms that #1 is never a valid sentence but I can still tell you that they are not going to mean the same thing. It is not the case that the first one is "more specific". The answers so far have referred to countable nouns and trying to parse the sentence in terms of English dialects. I think the part about countable ...


16

The other answers are baffling me. As a native speaker of American English, #1 sounds absolutely wrong. You don't speak "an English", so you can't speak "an impeccable English". You speak "English", so "She speaks impeccable English" would be correct. If you wanted to distinguish between different kinds of English (American, British, Australian, etc), I ...


14

'Few' is mainly used when talking about the number of 'count nouns', such as 'dogs'. You can say Few dogs make good friends with cats! to mean that not many dogs make good friends with cats. But if you said Little dogs make good friends with cats! this would suggest that dogs that are small (cat-sized, perhaps?) make good friends with cats. On the other ...


14

Talk can be either countable or uncountable. See this from the Oxford Learner's Dictionary Uncountable (definitions 4, 5, 6): include talk of ... means there will be conversation or discussion about something in general. Countable (definition 3): include a talk about ... means there will be a formal speech, presentation, or lecture.


13

Depending on the context, "ketchup" is a mass noun - any quantity of it is treated as an undifferentiated unit, rather than as something with discrete subsets. If you take a puddle of ketchup and split it in half, you have two puddles, not two ketchups. The puddles are differentiated, but the ketchup itself is not. There are some rarer edge cases where it ...


13

I heard somewhere that in English-speaking countries folk use just "traffic" instead of "traffic jam" This is not the case in the UK. "Traffic" is, in this context, the vehicles using the roads. If you say that you were delayed "because of traffic" it means that your journey took longer than you expected because there were more people using the roads than ...


13

Verbs, including copulas, agree with their subjects, not their objects. A reminiscence is ... However— We don't use reminiscence in the sense you appear to intend. A reminiscence is an act of remembering (or perhaps even more often an act of narrating), not the object of the act, the thing or matter which is remembered. It is acceptable to speak of ...


12

In American English, "Researches are going on" is grammatically incorrect. As a noun, "research" is not countable. If Americans want to talk about more than one research project, they talk about "research projects", not "researches". As a verb, "research" is conjugated the usual way. In the present tense: I research. We research. You research. You ...


11

Should I use the? Yes, you should use the article in front of number. Should I use number or numbers? If it is one set of items you are talking about, it is one number of items, so you use the singular. should I use is or are? Number is singular, so you use the verb in the singular. However, there is another point: the use of few. Few means that there ...


11

Alan and Nathan have both answered this, I'm only adding some references Magic is, indeed, an uncountable noun. However, an instance of magic is singular and so has often been made plural with the addition of an S. Kipling writing in Strand Magazine in 1906 What's that for—magic?’ said Una... ‘One of my little magics,’ he answered. - sourced from the ...


10

While uncountable nouns usually do not have plurals, they can sometimes follow an indefinite article. This could be when it is desired to qualify or limit the noun’s meaning. A crystalline prose, a leaden prose, a sparkling and lively prose. Macmillan Dictionaries, the source of your second definition of 'prose', has an article: Can the indefinite article be ...


10

As Jason Bassford's excellent answer indicates, "deal 6 damage" is an elided form of something like Deal 6 points of damage. Deal 6 damage tokens. and it's being used here as jargon, perhaps to conserve valuable space on the card. The use of jargon also helps with consistency; if one card says "Deal 6 units of damage" and another says "Deal 6 damage ...


10

There's a distinction between "apples" (countable) and "apple" (uncountable). I'd say that there's a distinction between "apples" and "apple" in this context: if you say that the pie was made from apples, you're specifying that it was made from multiple apples - there's a pile of apples, and you used them to make the ...


9

The dish is always called “apple pie“, and the main ingredients are: apple OR apples and sugar. Both the singular and the plural form are acceptable.


8

There is a difference between 'information questions', and requests or suggestions. If you ask an information question, you want the person listening just to give you some information: Is there any bread? Are there any doctors on the plane? Do any animals lay eggs but give their babies milk? If you want to make an offer or suggestion, or you want to ask ...


8

Fund is a countable noun meaning an amount of money kept for a specific purpose. There can be many different funds. Funds, in addition to its meaning as the plural of fund, is used as an uncountable noun synonymous with "money." Thus, it would take the comparative adjective "much" just as "money" does: How much funds did the organization raise? However, ...


8

She speaks an impeccable English. Concept A: Not all Englishes are the same, even within a particular dialect. We have our own idiolects. Her English (the English she speaks) is impeccable. Concept B: There is faulty English and there is faultless English. The English that comes out of her mouth is of the faultless sort. Impossible to say with any ...


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