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Your cars vs. traffic test is a good one. I agree with all of your answers except for "less" and "less and less." Both of these quantifiers are uncountable. This is actually a very common mistake that even native English speakers frequently make. "Less" and "fewer" are both words which mean "a smaller quantity," but "less" always refers to something ...


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cambridge labels dough as [ C or U ], which means Countable or Uncountable. You could use dough as Uncountable pick up 3 pieces of dough You could also use dough as Countable pick up 3 doughs


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If I were a consumer, and I read either of the two examples, I would suspect the product contained gluten. Why? Because the the label, as Shakespeare might have written, “doth protest too much.” “This product is gluten-free” is perfect. I would believe that.


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Do you like [food] is a general question not, a specific one, so it is very unusual for the [food] to be singular. It is generally plural (Do you like oranges?) or uncountable (Do you like fruit). In neither case is an article normal.


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