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4 votes

talked to the man dancing

a. I talked to the man dancing. [He is the dancer.] b. I talked to him dancing. [He is the dancer.] In written, formal English, the man is dancing, not I. If you wanted to say that I was dancing ...
Ringo's user avatar
  • 7,738
3 votes
Accepted

Dangling modifiers

Native speakers use them. In fact, the example is likely a paraphrase of Sleeping in my orchard, a serpent stung me. Shakespeare (Hamlet, Act 1, sc 5). Shakespeare was a native speaker. Most listeners ...
Jim Reynolds's user avatar
  • 9,997
3 votes
Accepted

Dangling prepositions

The first is viable. If I were going to change it, it wouldn't be because of the "dangling preposition;" instead, I would use a more formal verb than "come up with" (such as derive): This solution ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
2 votes
Accepted

Dangling participle comma relationship

The sentence with having is definitely incorrect, and I think it is a dangling participle, yes. "Having come from" should modify I, not it. However, you can't just run the two sentences together ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.9k
2 votes

Confused about dangling participles in sentence

The dangling modifier clause, of which the dangling participle is the example most famously derided by teachers of English for a century, is the term we use to describe a situation in which part of a ...
P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Should I use possessive + gerund structure or reduced participial clause?

These are three rather different constructions, and different usage patterns (I hesitate to say "rules") apply. I will address them one at a time. After the house having burnt, he thought ...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.2k
2 votes

Should I use possessive + gerund structure or reduced participial clause?

Sentence #1 is not idiomatic because the function of the phrase "having burnt" is unclear. I suppose that the most likely explanation would be that it modifies "house", but then &...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Dangling participle "Growing up in Missouri, they would kind of take us out into the woods"?

I think that the participle phrase applies to us. The sentence would be clearer as "When we were growing up in Missouri,..." It's a misplaced modifier, though it does have a reference in the ...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

The following of a piece of writing seems a dangling modifier!

1) This elegant version: Besieged in court, routed in eight states, accused of favoring blacks and Latinos at the expense of Asians and whites, affirmative action — a major legacy of the civil rights ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.5k
1 vote

Dangling phrases

I am not sure that what you are talking about is grammar. When I was in school, which was when dinosaurs still roamed the earth, we called it rhetoric, the art of being clear and persuasive. A basic ...
Jeff Morrow's user avatar
  • 32.1k
1 vote
Accepted

I don't understand why this is a 'dangling' sentence

In general, a "dangling" sentence, phrase, or clause, is one that is not a complete sentence and requires something else to make it complete. In your example, "trying to dissuade and telling her to ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
1 vote
Accepted

The subject of "lacking accounts by conquered people..."

You have discovered the dangling participle: a participle that modifies a noun that isn't there (or a different noun than the one intended). It is poor English, and you are right to call it out as an ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 27.6k
1 vote

Being taken and being beaten

I think you are mistaken in your belief that starting a sentence with Being past participle in isolation has an implication of While he was being ... In all cases I can think of we would ...
djna's user avatar
  • 7,608

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