Hot answers tagged

23

Just add a was or is after the date. Practically speaking, it doesn't really matter which one you use. Either one will work equally fine: August 22nd, 2012 was the day my life changed forever and the day I met you. The sentence would actually sound a lot smoother if you rewrite it like this: August 22nd, 2012 is the day when my life changed forever ...


19

Yes, the word "day" can mean the entire 24-hour period. But it can also mean just the part where the Sun is above the horizon. It can also mean the part of the day during which work and other "daytime" activities are accomplished. Examples: "A week is seven days long." "Please respond within 30 days." "The light he called day but the darkness he called ...


17

There is nothing wrong with using the day by itself: He has been absent since the 4th. Of course, one would hope that context or prior knowledge within the conversation would ensure the listener knows what month is being talked about. For example, if you asked me about my Christmas travel plans, I might say: We leave on the 22nd. and it would be ...


15

You could start the sentence with the preposition on On August 22, 2012, my life changed forever when I met you for the first time.


14

The question succinctly could be expressed like this: How does one say сутки in English? That's really what the original poster is asking as this is one of the most common questions asked by Russian speakers who are new to English. He's just not being very clear about it (but that's fine). Yes, it's true. The word сутки in Russian means an amount of time ...


12

She wants you to go to work on Monday. When talking about time, the word "till" (or "until") usually doesn't include the endpoint. For example, "I don't have class until 5:00" implies that I have class at 5. Once it reaches 5, the statement "I don't have class" no longer applies. Similarly, once it reaches Monday, the statement "don't come back to work" no ...


11

Yes, there is a word meaning "24 consecutive hours". It's nychthemeron. Not an everyday word, and few people would know it, but still it exists!


10

A date written as "July 31" can be equally correctly pronounced "July thirty-one" and "July thirty-first". It stands to reason that a date written as "31 July" can also be pronounced a number of ways, including the bare "thirty-one July". Note that to American ears, writing a date as "31 July" is unnatural to begin with, so how you pronounce it makes very ...


10

It sounds like день translates best to "daytime", while сутки translates to "day". In many cases English speakers will use "day" for either, unless we want to distinguish the part when the sun is up from the nighttime. In this case we say "during the day", which almost always means the part of the day when the sun is up. She likes to paint during the ...


9

Like @Bilkokuya, I too find the current wording is essentially best, I would just change the punctuation slightly (and remove a word). I would switch the firstsecond comma for a colon, and change the word 'and' into an hyphenm-dash (or n-dash if you're a rebel). Spaces should be removed from around your dash (but it looks ugly so be even more rebellious and ...


8

A Google search for "MA March or May" returns several results stating that in two-letter abbreviations for best before dates, MR stands for March and MA stands for May. From the Canadian Food Inspection Agency: The bilingual symbols for the months in the durable life date are as follows [B.01.007(5), FDR]: JA for JANUARY FE for FEBRUARY MR for MARCH AL ...


7

It is true that "day" can have multiple shades of meaning, depending on context. If you need to disambiguate: A calendar day is a 24-hour period from midnight to midnight. Daytime or daylight hours refers to the time between sunrise and sunset.


6

I’m confused whether the latter can be used or not. Would you tell me? ‘thirty one July.’ might be correct in foreign varieties of English but, it's not in the English kind of English. In England and the rest of the UK, it would be exceptional to find even one person who said dates like that. I haven't heard that at all. It could be that saying it that way ...


6

The first date is always more recent than the second Sounds just fine, if you're sure it's true! (It is in this case, of course). In this type of situation, when you're looking for an adjective (comparative) to use, my advice is use the one most suited to the noun (thing) you're describing. On face value, those are numbers in your example. But really, they'...


6

You should only use "the" if you also put "of" between the date and the month: "...between the 3rd of December, 2010, and..." "On the 6th of May, 2013, three men..." Also note the placement of the commas around the year, a pretty strict standard if you include the date. Of course, the European format doesn't take commas, or "the," or "of": "...between 3 ...


6

There are times when it is useful to say both the relative day (tomorrow) and and absolute day (Tuesday), and this is usually in an email situation when it not determinable when the email will be read. It might be written as How about we postpone our meeting tomorrow (Tuesday, 22nd), until...? However in conversation or when context is well understood, ...


6

Don't think you're being 'dumb'. Many advanced English learners still make this mistake. 'On' is used for days. Any word with 'day' in it needs 'on'. on Tuesday, on my birthday, on holiday, etc. Also if you give a day a name, such as the 2nd of June, you also need 'on'. On the 2nd, on the second of June, on the 2nd of June 1998. But be careful, if you ...


5

In American English, we don't normally write dates that way, but instead write and say with the month first — even if it's written day first, we'd still usually pronounce it month first. So "27 July" becomes "July twenty-seventh". I believe other dialects usually, but not always, include the article before the day when putting the day before the month,...


4

I also like using "earlier" and "later" for dates. While they may seem more suited to time, they are often used with dates ("in earlier years", "at a later date", etc). A date is a record of time anyway. When creating messages for exceptions or user validation and I need to specify that one date must precede or succeed another (also acceptable terms, I ...


4

It's actually correct to omit the "the" in "in early 2015". To my knowledge, native speakers mostly don't put "the" before a year date (year ranges are treated differently though, natives do put "the" in front of year ranges, like "the 90s"), due to semantical reasons rather than grammatical reasons. Teachers make mistakes too! A native speaker's ...


4

by not later than; at or before: on use on to designate days and dates at use at to designate specific times. So, I have to go by 9 am means the latest you can stay is 9 am. You have to leave at or before 9 am. I have to go on 9 am does not make sense because on is used with days and dates. I have to go at 9 am means you have to leave when ...


4

Month names do not take the definite article except when you're concerned to distinguish a particular month from other months of the same name (e.g., the January when we had such warm weather--was that 1980 or 82?). A day-of-month designator expressed as an ordinal number (first, second, third, &c) may take the definite article if it follows the month ...


4

The correct reading for "the 1870's" is "the eighteen seventies" even though it describes a time in the nineteenth century. I have never heard that time period referred to as "the seventies of the nineteenth century".


4

"2 months later" implies that you have mentioned a date already and are referring to a point two months after that date, e.g. I'll be checking out some hotels next week, and I will fly to Japan 2 months later. As for an alternative, you may replace "from now" in the sentence by prepending the word "in" to the time measurement: I will fly to japan in two ...


4

As others have said, leave the words and change the punctuation. August 22, 2012—­the day my life changed forever, the day I met you. But if you need a true sentence (requiring a verb) rather than a phrase, how about, August 22, 2012 was the day my life changed forever—the day I met you. This is perhaps more a style question than a usage one. For me,...


4

I would spell out the month. In the US the preferred style is October 14, 1995. We say "fourteenth" but omit the "th" in writing the number in dates. However, if I write the day of the month by itself, then I will use the "th": "I'm leaving for Ohio on the 14th." I'm not sure about Canada, but other English-speaking countries follow different conventions, ...


3

A native speaker would understand: Hire Date must be within the last thirty days. But if you have an international audience comprised of speakers with varying degrees of English competence, a more roundabout way might be better, since English learners often have trouble with prepositions like within and adjectives like last.


3

Even to native English speakers, "by" is ambiguously either inclusive, or not inclusive of the date/time being mentioned. For example, if you say "have it on my desk by Friday", some English speakers will interpret that as including Friday, and some (like me) will not. That's one reason why people often try to make it more specific, as they have done here, ...


3

If you say "I don't have class till Monday", Monday will not be included. But when you say "I have class till Tuesday," Tuesday is included.


3

The standard way for an American to speak the date represented by October 1, 1958 is October first, nineteen fifty-eight, as exemplified in Franklin Roosevelt's speech declaring war on Japan following the attack on Pearl Harbor: Yesterday, December seventh, nineteen forty-one, a date which will live in infamy … There are numerous variations, however. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible