8

As other answers have noted, neither is correct. You need She scored ... or She scores ... Although correct, these are awkward. In soccer/football you can say "she scored" but in this context I think the score belongs to the exam more than to the mathematician. So the sentence you want to replace is better: she had the highest score on the math ...


4

Neither of those are correct. no2 is more correct, but you still must conjugate to "She scores the highest on the math exam" or "She scored the highest on the math exam Hope this helped!


3

The second form "Are both of you atheists" is the simple and correct form. Adding "the" sounds a little odd to my ears, perhaps it is a dialect form, certainly less standard. I'm sure that this form has some use, for example This town ain't big enough for the both of us. The OED says now it is chiefly regional or colloquial; Merriam-...


2

I think no2 She scores the highest (record) on the math exam


2

I don't find it particularly funny... This is marginally possible, it sounds rather babyish. A child might use "nanny" as a term of address. Nanny, can you help me? And as a term of address, it doesn't have an article. In the context you give, it suggests that the man is shooting his own nanny, which makes him seem cruel and spoilt, rather than ...


1

In this case it doesn't matter what article you will use, because it is a generic reference, which means that if you say The air/an air/air it all means the same --> you introduce representative of its kind. It is connected to the term "Communicative dynamism". The most important piece of info in the sentence or the newest information you want ...


1

They both sound a bit unnatural, but the first choice is preferable. "The" is a definite article, and should refer to something definite and specific. Therefore, if you wanted to say "the", you might say: Thank you for taking the time out of your day (today), to run errands for me. That is one day, and one block of time, so the word &...


1

The speaker is identifying which rain the villagers are waiting for. The rain that arrives at a more or less specific period of time. If the rain doesn't fall at the expected time, the crop will inevitably suffer.


1

We are talking about rain in general to come, not any specific rain, then why are we using the definite article here? On the contrary, this sentence is talking about some specific rain, not rain in general. The specific rain is probably a seasonal rain which is expected to come at a predictable time, or a specific weather system such as a low pressure ...


1

You would use "a" or "the". Probably "the" because I guess there is one particular publication that is the US SAT vocabulary book. Or the listener knows which book you mean On the other hand, if this is actually a type of publication, and there are many different books that are all US SAT vocabulary books, it could be "a&...


1

I don't find any of them idiomatic in the given context. Asking "what is best" is more given to a more general context than just one single event such as your own dinner party. For example, one might ask "what is best to serve at a dinner party?", which in effect asks what foods are most suited for the context of a dinner party, rather ...


1

Non-native speaker here. The cases of "the" proceeding a given name that I think I have heard in informal language are mostly when there is more than one person with the same name involved: The Mike you'd like to talk to just left. (there is more than one person whose name is Mike who, for example, works at this office.) You're not the Mike that ...


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