40

Of course in most contexts we use a to refer to a generic, non-specific example of some class (or the first mention of a specific member of that class), and the to refer to a specific previously-mentioned member of that class. This is not the case here. In this usage, both a and the can be used to describe an exemplary peasant, taking some random peasant in ...


27

In your example sentence you are referring to the cold weather experienced in a particular country. The definite article would not be necessary if you were speaking of cold weather in general. I don't mind the snow. I'm used to cold weather.


24

If you want to look at an example of this, I suggest looking up Aesop's fables. They are relatively short, are easy to find online for free, and most of them feature animals as the characters. Throughout the story, each animal is referred to as "the [animal]" numerous times, and it sounds natural. If the animal is described using "a/an" ...


21

"get used to cold weather" means to get used to cold weather in general. Without "the", the sentence means that after living in that country you won't be as bothered by cold weather. "get used to the cold weather" is more specific about the type of cold weather that exists in this country. The country might have particular ...


20

As the comment says, "the seasons" refers to a specific set of seasons: winter, spring, summer, and fall. in temperate climates; dry and rainy in some tropical areas. Also, "the seasons" is a standard fixed phrase. When speaking (or writing) about a set of things, particularly when there is really only one set, and especially when it is ...


15

Nouns in English pretty much always come with some kind of determiner attached - either the ones that indicate exactly what you're talking about and whether they're known to the listener (a, the, my, this, those) or the ones that describe the amount of things (some, many, two, every, more, which). They determine what you're referring to, so the listener ...


15

We can use the indefinite article (a peasant) if we are discussing an unknown peasant, or the definite article if we are discussing the generic peasant (considered as a type of person). Either is appropriate in the context you quoted.


14

When talking about a specific thing, we use the definite article the. In this sentence, we are talking about the specific type of the specific file that we are naming, even if we are explaining a guideline that applies to the naming of any file. The sentence should therefore be: Avoid including words that are clear from the file type or otherwise obvious.


9

You likely know how the definite article works in comparison to the indefinite article. If there is only one of something we use the definite article. With this question of belief, the choice of article really reflects what the person asking the question knows, believes, or assumes about the person they are posing the question to. There are many different ...


8

As other answers have noted, neither is correct. You need She scored ... or She scores ... Although correct, these are awkward. In soccer/football you can say "she scored" but in this context I think the score belongs to the exam more than to the mathematician. So the sentence you want to replace is better: she had the highest score on the math ...


6

Usage is changing over time in this context, which just goes to show that classifying nouns as "countable" or "uncountable" isn't always particularly useful... So far as I'm concerned, all three of OP's highlighted instances of past tense can validly be preceded by all three "articles" (that's to say, a, the and the "zero ...


6

In both cases, you’re using ’peasant’ as a generic, but the generic forms are different in their meaning. A generic formed with the definite article in English is generally categorical. In other words, it talks about the noun as a category of person/place/thing/idea, describing all items referenced by that noun as one group. This is essentially the same as ...


5

In my experience "on a rampage" describes the actions of a person or entity, while "on the rampage" describes the state of a person or entity. Example: "My boss went on a rampage and fired eight employees!" or "My boss is on the rampage, he just fired eight employees!". I hope this helps.


5

Canadian Yankee is correct (and perhaps should make an answer?) It's irrelevant that seasons is plural - "the" specifies a particular group or set. A specific group is often referred to with singular syntax. Note that in this case deleting "the" wouldn't really change the meaning. Since "the seasons" referred to are the only ...


4

The definite article is not used to designate something already mentioned. Consider the archetypal simple English sentence “The cat sat on the mat.” Neither the cat nor the mat has been previously mentioned. The definite article is used to refer to a specific item rather than one of a class. “The cat sat on the mat” means that a specific cat sat on a ...


4

The definite article “the” denotes that a definite thing is being referred to, rather than the abstract idea of that thing. You can specify which thing in the first mention. We are attracting attention. Here, we have not specified whose attention, so it is still abstract. We cannot use a definite article for an abstract thing. We are attracting the ...


4

Yes, you need the "The." "Pashto" functions as an adjective, and therefore the grammatical structure would be the same if you removed it. Then you would get Language belongs to the eastern Iranian branch That does not work. Therefore you must say, "The language," and insert the adjective to get "The Pashto" ...


4

This may not be a good idea, but I am tempted to put this in computer programming terms. My feeling about this as a native speaker who just saw this question come up on the sidebar is that when you say "the seasons", you are passing a data structure, whereas when you say "seasons", you are passing the data individually. So if you want to ...


4

Yes you should always add "the", if you want to specifically say somebody. If you say: And then snowman ... Would sound strange, you need to say: And then the snowman ... Without the "the", would mean a general snowman. Ah and thanks to @KateBunting, she mentions that if you make the first letter capital (treating it as the character'...


4

"The Bible" is the name of a book. Hence, "Read The Bible" (note the capitalisation of "The") is an instruction to read a copy, any copy of "The Bible". Note you can also say "Read a bible" and it would mean a very similar thing, but the assumption could be that one would be just using it to consult it on a ...


4

Neither of those are correct. no2 is more correct, but you still must conjugate to "She scores the highest on the math exam" or "She scored the highest on the math exam Hope this helped!


4

No, you cannot say "none of people", because when you say "none of X", you are referring to none of some specific collection of people (like "the people I know"). Therefore you have to say "the people".


3

All day is a fixed expression that means the same thing as the whole day. Your grammar book is correct. All of the day is grammatical but not idiomatic in the sense of being an established expression. So your example sentence is fine. More often, people might say We spent all of that day on the beach, referring back to an occasion that they have already ...


3

Because you have "that" acting as a determiner, you don't need an article as well. after that first year. Consider as an example: Look at the car. Look at that car. Both "the" and "that" in these two examples serve to highlight which particular car you mean.


3

It is not clear that Poe had a single thing in mind. He was a poet as well as a writer of short stories so it is quite possible that he had multiple meanings in mind. in the heaven is an odd phrase. The usual way of speaking would be to say "in Heaven" or "in the heavens." In Heaven means the singular place where, according to the ...


3

Useful tips: Bear in mind that when a is followed by the, something specific is involved. Also, a is for a general idea but the plural countable noun can also be for a general idea. They both become "the" after their specificity is established. Just try to keep in mind: a= general, the=specific. Countable nouns are either a or plural as in: Do you ...


3

It depends on whether the name of the country is just a proper noun or a common noun/collection of common nouns. For example: The United Kingdom: is a collection of common nouns The United States of America is a collection of common nouns followed by a proper noun Whereas Russia: Just a proper noun China: Just a proper noun Britain: Just a proper noun


3

I'm sure you will get used to (the) cold weather in this country. They are both correct but they have very different meanings. 1. Maria has just moved from southern Spain to Greenland to be with her boyfriend Malik Maria: Whew! I'm freezing! Malik: Don't worry. I'm sure you will get used to the cold weather in this country. Maria will become accustomed to ...


3

When we are listing multiple items, we don't usually repeat the article if the items are closely related or are considered together as one item. the horse and rider rapidly get to know each other The knife and fork began to sway and then to dance around the table a chosen distance from the left and right lower control arms In the title The Nature and ...


3

We use the definite article - the - when the object is unique, or clearly identifiable. In your example there are three pens, so "the pen" doesn't make it clear which one you refer to. If the three pens belonged to the three people, you could say "each person has their pen" (or "their respective pen"). If the pens and the people ...


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