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The definite and indefinite articles are used in front of languages when they refer to a variety of that language: The English spoken in Canada differs from that spoken in the U.S. only in pronunciation. Or to its use in a particular situation or medium: The English (used) in that article leaves much to be desired.


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Your usage of "I can't edit a specific ..." is exactly how I would write that question. However it would be just as correct, grammatically speaking, to write: "I can't edit this specific page: ..." and I think you will find both examples in use fairly commonly. In both cases, the inclusion of 'specific' is the most important bit.


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You could use the definite article here if you were talking about specific "less frequently used words or constructions". For example, the previous sentence might have mentioned two kinds of words or constructions: ones that are more frequently used and ones that are less frequently used. In that case, the definite article would be appropriate. (...


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There is no significance in the inclusion/omission of the. Since you is used later in the sentence, the writer could also have put with your eyes wide open.


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In both examples, it is more idiomatic to say "half an apple" rather than "a half apple". In your first example, you might possibly mention the whole apple specifically, to avoid confusion. There is half an apple. The whole apple weighed 150grams. It 'weighed' because the whole apple no longer exists. For your second example, you could ...


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In your context there might not be any practical difference between "contestant number 1" and "the first contestant", but there are differences. 'Contestant' is a common noun - that is, there are many contestants. A common noun needs an article (eg "I'm eating an apple") or some other determiner such as a possessive (eg "I'...


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In British English, both "government" and "the government" are correct, and it is not necessary for "government" to refer to an abstract process. "Who runs government: the Prime Minister" (UK government website) "That will be critical when Government decides how new funding is allocated." (East Sussex Bus ...


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In American English, the article is required. First, you are referring to an actual government, not an abstract concept. When anarchists say something like "Government is evil," they refer to an abstraction, so an article is not required. In your case, you are referring to a government in a tangible sense, so it is countable. At the national level, ...


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I think we would say "I went to the bank/hospital/theater/airport/supermarket/pharmacy/beach" because in all of these cases, the experience of going will be similar no matter which particular bank/hospital/etc. you actually went to. However, it is "I went to a restaurant/museum/boutique" because with these, the experience depends on what ...


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I think it's worth a special short answer about the word "cinema." As a word for a place where you go to see movies, it has become rare in US English, where you would say "movie theater." If you go to see a movie, and it's not important which movie, it is common to say "I went to the movies." If you're in the US, talking about a ...


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Yes, either a definite (the) or indefinite (a/an) article is valid in any of your sentences. The distinction is that if you go to a place, then you might expect your listener to ask “Which one?”. “I went to a museum with my family last week.” “Which museum?” “The Museum of Natural Science” “I'm going to a wedding this Friday.” “Whose wedding?” “Jack and Jill'...


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I think that both (a) and (b) would have the same meaning to most fluent speakers, and neither implies anything about how many stepbrothers (beyond 1) Jim has. I think (a) is much more likely to be used than (b) is, unless the speaker is going to speak about Jim's other stepbrothers. I am not sue of the technical term for this use of "the", but ...


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I'm not sure I agree with Kate Bunting's answer. Consider the following: I went to the bank I went to the restaurant The other answer argues that in either case (albeit the second case being less common) I would be referring to the one I usually go to. I would argue instead that they actually have different meanings. In the first example, "I went to ...


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Yes, the station, the library etc. can mean 'the local one' or 'the one I usually go to'. This is less common with café and restaurant, probably because there is likely to be a wider choice of eating places in the speaker's local area - though Brits do talk about going to the pub! Conversely, we're unlikely to refer to an airport/station because we go to the ...


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Both are grammatical. They have different meanings, and either might be appropriate in context. By far the more likely is the king left an heir, because "an heir" is new in the discourse, and is most often qualified with an indefinite article. If you said The king left the heir, this imply that the heir has already been discussed (and probably ...


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If you are referring to anyone use the. So, use the in this case since you are referring to any infantry/artillery If you are referring to a specific, use ‘a’ or no article. What’s the difference? When to use ‘a’ and ‘the’ and no articles? See if the question flows. Take this statement I was walking home when a girl approached me. (Specific girl. Cannot ...


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