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To me the sentence makes perfectly sense. In the first part you speak about a concrete job (which obviously had already been introduced into the conversation, a circumstance which is indicated by the). In the second part you speak about your general desire for a (!) job (or position) that has certain characteristics, but it can be any job, i.e. also a ...


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There seems to be a degree of universality implied when you omit the "the", as in, it is accepted that "everyone does this" (or at least that the possibility applies to everyone). There also seems to be an implicit suggestion of what you will be doing there, which is again, universal (to a degree). Examples: Going to jail Going to court Going to bed Going ...


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You should not omit "the" when talking about a particular zoo. "The" is sometimes omitted when we are speaking of the "social institution" (a collection of people) and not "the physical building". You have to go to school until you are 18 We go to church on Sunday. If you are talking about a particular school then use "the" I go to the school ...


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If you aren't talking about one particular wallet that has a zippered pocket (as opposed to the other two which do not), then using the here is awkward and confusing. If you mean to refer to all of the wallets, then the following is the way of doing so that makes the least amount of change to your sentence: I have three wallets. Each wallet has the same ...


3

You can't use "the" since it is not clear "which wallet" you mean. I know that you mean that they all have a pocket, so that is what you have to say. You don't need to use "each" in the first part either. You can use the plural since you are talking about all three wallets: ... The wallets all have the same shape but different colours. ... All the ...


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You use the definite article "the" when you are referring to something specific that would not otherwise be recognised as such. For example, you might say "the car" when referring to a specific car, because there are many cars; but if you had already identified a specific car by some other means there would be no need for the definite article. You wouldn't ...


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The phrase "into the orbit" is for a specific orbit, whereas "into orbit" could be any orbit. We put the satellite into the orbit of the International Space Station. However for a specific type of orbit I would use "a". We put the satellite into a geostationary orbit. But in a general sense, we say We put the satellite into orbit.


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Yes, saying "the room has a window" does not rule out the possibility of more than one. We say this sort of thing all the time. Like if I say, "Yesterday I met a tall man", no one would take that to mean that the man I am talking about is the only tall man in the world. I think you're confusion is one I've heard from people learning English before. "The" ...


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As a general rule of thumb, one would normally treat any acronym as the words it substitutes for. However, there are many exceptions to this, which I will go on to detail. For your specific example though, you would correctly say: The United States of America So it would be correct to say: The USA. There are lots of other countries whose names ...


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This is not a grammatical question, but one of usage. "In the USA" sounds natural to me, "In USA" not (British English Speaker). The iWeb corpus has 141 175 instances of "In/to the USA", against 35 083 of "In/to USA"; but many of the latter are "In USA [noun]", where it is used as a modifier, so the relevant number is much smaller.


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