4

The most appropriate definition that I can find among those supplied by Oxford Dictionaries is: expressing the relationship between a general category or type and the thing being specified which belongs to such a category. "the city of Prague" In your case, state or quality is the general category and being red is the thing specified.


3

If you feel guilty about something, you have a single feeling of guilt- a guilty feeling. If you have a number of feelings that you think you should not have, they are guilty feelings - plural. This is analogous to the expression "guilty secrets", where you have more than one secret that you feel guilty about. If you regularly feel guilty about ...


3

Try reading it like this: A Man Who Threatened To Shoot Nancy Pelosi In The Head On Live TV Has Pleaded Guilty


3

English is pretty open to the creation of new compound words, especially when using recognised suffixes or prefixes. The suffix 'struck' literally means that you have been struck by (in the sense of having a sudden feeling) whatever it is suffixing. For example, "dumbstruck" means that you have been 'struck dumb', or suddenly unable to speak; and &...


3

Merriam-webster defines bitt as a post or pair of posts fixed on the deck of a ship for securing lines If you google "bitt images" you will find plenty of pictures of them. port is the left-hand side of a ship when facing forwards, so "to the port of a bitt" means on the left hand side of a post that you attach ropes to. I can't find ...


3

II. That which plays. ✝6. A metal pendant to a horse's bit. Obs. 1598 FLORIO, Saliutra,.. among riders the plate whereat the players that hang in the mids of a port are fastned. 1607 MARKHAM Caval. VI. (1617) 57 He shall haue Snaffles of all shapes..with small rings in the midst, and sundry sort of small players fastned to those ringes, which to a trauel- ...


2

Here is the actual meaning thanks to the OED1: Player ... II. That which plays. ✝ 6. A metal pendant to a horse's bit. Obs. 1598 Florio, Saliuéra,..among riders the plate whereat the players that hang in the mids of a port are fastned. 1607 Markham Caval. VI. (1617) 57 He shall haue Snaffles of all shapes..with small rings in the midst, and sundry sort of ...


2

I don't think either of them fits the definition 'better'. Both of them fit it. If you're asking something else, it would be better to just tell us.


2

It's both. She is crying for help. In the above, "is" is a finite verb because it is conjugated in agreement with the third-person singular subject "she" and is conjugated in the present tense. In the above, "is" is also a helping verb, helping the main verb "crying." When "is" (or the verb "be") ...


2

As you were told in the comments, blue is an actual colour so it would be strange to say that a colour has a colour, or that blue has blue... BUT, I would just like to point out that people do use such sentences as This colour has blue in it or Most whites that have a tint of blue in them This however is a specific reference to colour of paints, to the ...


2

Blue is an adjective, not a noun. So the sky is blue - adjective describes the sky but the sky has blue - incorrect - the sky cannot possess blue as it is not a noun.


2

"In like manner" was once a fairly common phrase, meaning "in the same way as". As this google Ngram shows, it was somewhat common around 1820 (in the group of texts analyzed by Google) and had dropped to around one percent of its former frequency by 1980. As the same Ngram shows, "in like manner with" has at all times been much ...


2

I think this is a "head over heels" phrase. The phrase "kind and humbling words" appears often enough almost to be an idiom. It refers to words of praise spoken to or about another person. But just like "head over heels" it seems to have exactly the opposite meaning! It seems to mean: "You said good things about me, but ...


1

"Cynical" is a confusing word because it has two meanings that are near opposites. Merriam-Webster has these two descriptions: Essential Meaning of cynical 1 : believing that people are generally selfish and dishonest She's become more cynical in her old age. 2 : selfish and dishonest in a way that shows no concern about treating other people ...


1

Guilt is a complex feeling, and it rarely consists of just one "feeling". Let's say I stole a something from a store. I might feel: Guilty that I broke the law. Guilty that I disappointed my parents. Guilty that I went against the precepts of my religion. Guilty that I stole something after previously having decided I would never do something ...


1

I think the most direct reading of "feeling" vs "feelings" is that the plural form indicates either feelings that regularly surface, or feelings that can't be defined simply (as in, it's not just guilt, it's also envy, and maybe some lust, there's always some of that lingering).


1

For the verb break, there are three forms: break (infinitive), broke (simple past) and broken (past participle). For the majority of verbs- the ones where the simple past ends in -ed, the simple past is the same as the past participle. This is true for separate, which has forms separate (infinitive), separated (simple past) and separated (past participle). ...


1

"Uncomfortable" can have the meaning "uneasy" or "not comfortable", so "not very comfortable" could mean either one. It should be clear from the context what the intended meaning is. Also, "not very comfortable" does not mean "very uncomfortable" or "very uneasy". It means "somewhat ...


1

As Kate and Ronald pointed out, "high water" is an expression meaning "high tide". High can also mean tall, of height. This is the meaning closer for this example. From Merriam-Webster: having a specified height or elevation or, as you listed: rising or extending upward a great distance : taller than average, usual, or expected


1

The dictionary you link to is pointing out different ways 'either' is used. A) as a pronoun referring to two things, or B) as a conjunction, where it can be used to link two or more things. When used as a pronoun, you cannot use 'either' to refer to more than two items. Instead you can use 'any'. But you cannot use 'any' as a conjunction, therefore 'no ...


1

In both cases mentioned in the question there is a conditional construction using "If {condition} then {result}." In the examples listed under 4 the condition is something that might or might not happen in the future. You might or might not be sick on any given day, traffic might or might not be heavy. The conditional sentence is advising what the ...


1

The Collins definition is quite a poor one. Literally, the words "no less a person than" mean "a person of no lower importance, rank, etc. than", but that implies they could also refer to someone more powerful, like a King or an Emperor, which is not the case. The structure "no less a/an" + A + "than" + B has the ...


1

The verb be is finite (tensed) because it determines the tense of the clause. In this case, the clause is present tense because the verb be inflects for present tense. The verb be is virtually always an auxiliary. It is auxiliary because it is involved in the subject auxiliary inversion: Is she crying for help? and can be negated with Not: She isn't crying ...


1

The terms are definitely similar but I believe they mean different things. A social norm is an expectation that a person will do something because everyone else does it, or often does it. These norms can vary based on family, friend group, work environment, country, continent, etc. For example, among one group it might be a social norm that families always ...


1

That wouldn’t be how most native speakers would say it. However, they might say: 3 subtracted from 10 Not entirely related, but useful nevertheless: in terms of writing style, it is common practice to write numbers as words instead of numerals when they start a sentence. The same applies for numbers less than 100 (or 10, depending on the style being used). ...


1

An alternative wording would be to say that they incurred the debts.


1

To run up a debt, deficit, bill, loss, etc, is, indeed, to accumulate these things.


1

For a start, there are more than 5 phrase types. There are infinitive phrases, gerund phrases and absolute phrases to name a few more. I think there are about 9 or 10 phrase types taught, but perhaps it is safer to say that for any phrase to be valid, it must have a recognisable grammatical structure. This question appears to be the promised follow-up to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible