126 votes

How do you say 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 in words?

It's: one hundred quintillion or: a hundred quintillion The words for very large numbers If you're wondering how to form other huge numbers like this, here's the pattern: A thousand thousands is a ...
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  • 27.4k
52 votes
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"I hate red color" or "I hate red": why exactly is the first option ungrammatical

When "red" is followed by a noun, native English speakers will classify "red" as an adjective. If that noun is then singular (and the noun phrase is undetermined, i.e. has no definite article, ...
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  • 1,198
41 votes
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"One of THOSE days" vs "one of THESE days"

One of these days One of those days These are idioms. The former means sometime in the near future. So you can say "we really must visit them one of these days". The latter (one of those days) ...
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  • 26.8k
36 votes

How do you say 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 in words?

Wikipedia lists large scale numbers here. As only the 10x with x being a multiple of 3 get their own names, you read 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 as 100 * 1018, so this is 100 quintillion in American ...
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  • 14.2k
36 votes
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Is there a rule that prohibits us from using 2 possessives in a row?

I've answered essentially the same question over at english.stackexchange.com: Why is “our today's meeting” wrong? Usually, a noun phrase in English must have exactly one determiner: you can say "I ...
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  • 4,948
33 votes

Why is there no article after "no" in "I have no car"

Articles belong to a group of words called "determiners". Besides articles, there are other determiners in the English language, and "no" is a determiner too. Let me quote from BBC: No is a ...
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  • 36.2k
33 votes
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Why is there no article after "no" in "I have no car"

"A" is like saying "one": I have a car I have one car Logically then, saying "no" is like saying "zero": I have no car I have zero cars. Therefore, there is no need for an article. "Not" is ...
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  • 74.4k
32 votes
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When is 'what' used for living beings?

Which is ordinarily used when asking for the identity of a specific member or members of a known group: A: The government said they would release three prisoners. B: Which prisoners? There are ...
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31 votes

Can "few" be used as a subject? If so, what is the rule?

We use "little" for uncountable nouns and "few" for countable nouns. In your sentence Little has changed at work since the last employee survey was carried out. The general situation has changed a ...
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29 votes

"I hate red color" or "I hate red": why exactly is the first option ungrammatical

I think the sentence that you are looking for is "I hate the color red." This sentence suggests that you have a certain hatred or dislike of the certain color red, regardless of its medium or location....
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29 votes
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(The) Putin's ratings shot up. Is the definite article allowed here?

You should not use the in The war campaign has shot up Putin's ratings. Yes, the noun "ratings" is definite, but it already has a word that indicates whose ratings they are: Putin's ratings. You ...
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  • 36.2k
25 votes
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There's 'NO' my wallet - Is it right grammatically?

If there is not any wallet there, let me know. If there is not my wallet there, let me know. If there's no wallet there, let me know. If there's no my wallet there, let me know. Sentence (1) is ...
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23 votes

Is there a rule that prohibits us from using 2 possessives in a row?

There isn't a rule that you can't use two possessives, but they don't indicate possession of the noun at the end, but instead each one modifies the next phrase. Our last week's meeting Is ...
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  • 1,006
22 votes

"The" vs "that"

At a very basic level, that is the verbal counterpart to pointing at something in order to focus another person's attention on it in particular, so that the person does not mistake something else ...
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22 votes
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Can I say "This your pen is beautiful"?

It's not correct English as you intend it. "This" and "Your" are determiners, and specifically referring determiners. And you only use one referring determiner at a time. This pen My pen the ...
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  • 153k
22 votes

"Look at the pictures" or "Look at these pictures"?

Either the or these is fine, though the meaning is subtly different. "The plural noun" indicates you are talking about a (singular) group of items (plural) that are known to be the subject ...
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21 votes

She does homework every day vs She does her homework every day vs She does the homework every day

All your examples are grammatically correct. I haven't collected statistics but I'd guess "her homework" is most commonly used. You could certainly say that "her" is not required, as the reader is ...
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17 votes

Is "How much underwear?" okay?

Underwear, like trousers or jeans, are referred to as a pair, because it's a throwback to when pants (pantaloons) originally came in two pieces - a matching pair. A person would put on one leg, tie it ...
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  • 9,767
17 votes

Is there a rule that prohibits us from using 2 possessives in a row?

Our last week's meeting is a little akward, but I for one do not think that it is incorrect. The answer by Tanner Swett says "it's never acceptable for a noun phrase to have more than one ...
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16 votes
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Can I use two “half” for emphasis?

No. The three sentences all mean different things. Half of an apple is eaten means there was one half of an apple, and all of that one-half is eaten. Picture someone cutting an apple into two halves; ...
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  • 20.6k
14 votes

"I hate red color" or "I hate red": why exactly is the first option ungrammatical

"Red color" is unnatural because the color red isn't red. Instead, it's just called red. Think about it: A color has no color. It is a color but it does not have a color, like for example cars or ...
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  • 149
14 votes

How do you say 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 in words?

You can call it a hundred million million million. The three million in a row can be a bit confusing, which is why the word trillion was invented. Trillion is a contraction of tri (meaning three) and ...
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  • 241
13 votes
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22% of (the/all) Americans: using articles and determiners after percentages

A simple rule of thumb is, when you're talking about a noun that has a restrictive clause on it, use 'the'; if you're talking about an unrestricted noun, don't use 'the'. An "unrestricted noun" talks ...
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  • 18.1k
13 votes
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Is it grammatically correct to say or to write "some brain"?

Could you please give me some example of a more correct form of this kind of expression? This is tricky. Some nouns are mass nouns, meaning they can be regarded as plural, even in their singular form....
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  • 108k
13 votes
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Does An only come before apple

In English, we use a before words that sound like they begin with consonants. We saw a book on the table. There is a spider on your shoulder. Some words begin with vowels, but when pronounced ...
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  • 2,727
12 votes

How do you say 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 in words?

one hundred quintillion You can try all sorts of numbers on a site like this: http://saythenumber.com/?n=k2Y
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12 votes

Can I say "Any tiger is a dangerous animal"?

Yes, you can, but in the context of your second sentence it makes more sense. Two zoo workers are talking: A. That old tiger can't be dangerous, it's hardly got any teeth left. B. Look, ...
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  • 87.1k
11 votes

How do you say 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 in words?

Outside of mathematics, it is also common to read such a number as "one hundred million million million".
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10 votes
Accepted

Can we say 'she got out of her/the bed’ with a determiner?

Question #1 is simple: Yes. She got out of bed. Yes, that can mean that she got off her bed of laying there for some time. Question #2 is the tricky one. Answering questions that ask, "Can you ...
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  • 108k
10 votes

How do you say 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 in words?

As others before me have said, there are names for very large numbers, but these are quite esoteric and people may not know what you're talking about. These names aren't like "thousand" or "million", ...
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