123

It's: one hundred quintillion or: a hundred quintillion The words for very large numbers If you're wondering how to form other huge numbers like this, here's the pattern: A thousand thousands is a million: 1,000,000. A thousand millions is a billion: 1,000,000,000. A thousand billions is a trillion: 1,000,000,000,000. A thousand trillions is a ...


51

When "red" is followed by a noun, native English speakers will classify "red" as an adjective. If that noun is then singular (and the noun phrase is undetermined, i.e. has no definite article, indefinite article, or other determiner like "this" or "your" or something), then native English speakers hear the sentence as ungrammatical. I hate red bicycles. ...


41

One of these days One of those days These are idioms. The former means sometime in the near future. So you can say "we really must visit them one of these days". The latter (one of those days) means a bad day; a day when everything goes wrong. I missed breakfast, got late to work, and got caught in the rain at lunchtime - it was one of those days!...


36

I've answered essentially the same question over at english.stackexchange.com: Why is “our today's meeting” wrong? Usually, a noun phrase in English must have exactly one determiner: you can say "I drove this car" or "I drove my car", but not "I drove car" or "I drove this my car". Certain nouns (such as plural nouns and proper nouns) don't need ...


35

Wikipedia lists large scale numbers here. As only the 10x with x= multiples of 3 get their own names, you read 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 as 100 * 1018, so this is 100 quintillion in American and British English and 100 trillion in most (non-English speaking) other places. (Practical approach: The different naming patterns for large numbers obviously ...


34

Articles belong to a group of words called "determiners". Besides articles, there are other determiners in the English language, and "no" is a determiner too. Let me quote from BBC: No is a determiner expressing quantity like 'all', 'every', 'many', 'some', 'any', 'each', 'either', 'one', 'another' and is used before singular and plural nouns. It is ...


32

Which is ordinarily used when asking for the identity of a specific member or members of a known group: A: The government said they would release three prisoners. B: Which prisoners? There are over a hundred of them. What is ordinarily used when asking for the identity of somebody previously unknown. A: The government said they would release ...


32

"A" is like saying "one": I have a car I have one car Logically then, saying "no" is like saying "zero": I have no car I have zero cars. Therefore, there is no need for an article. "Not" is neither a determiner nor an article, so saying "I haven't a car" is fine as it is (although one is more likely to say "I don't have a car" or, for Americans, "I ...


30

We use "little" for uncountable nouns and "few" for countable nouns. In your sentence Little has changed at work since the last employee survey was carried out. The general situation has changed a bit. And "general situation" is an uncountable noun, therefore "little" is correct. In your second sentence Few have survived fighting polar bears ...


29

I think the sentence that you are looking for is "I hate the color red." This sentence suggests that you have a certain hatred or dislike of the certain color red, regardless of its medium or location. This is also a much more common sentence than your other options. I hope this answers your question.


29

You should not use the in The war campaign has shot up Putin's ratings. Yes, the noun "ratings" is definite, but it already has a word that indicates whose ratings they are: Putin's ratings. You may think of it as The war campaign has shot up his ratings. Words like "his, her, their" are called "possessive determiners". The definite article "the" ...


26

If there is not any wallet there, let me know. If there is not my wallet there, let me know. If there's no wallet there, let me know. If there's no my wallet there, let me know. Sentence (1) is kind of ok, but we would rarely ever use this kind of sentence without a contraction of is not: If there is not any wallet there, let me know. (awkward) If there ...


23

There isn't a rule that you can't use two possessives, but they don't indicate possession of the noun at the end, but instead each one modifies the next phrase. Our last week's meeting Is naturally read as (Our last week)'s meeting So, unless you are talking about meeting someone with in the week before you both die, it is unlikely to mean what you ...


22

At a very basic level, that is the verbal counterpart to pointing at something in order to focus another person's attention on it in particular, so that the person does not mistake something else similar to it for it, or so that the person understands that the one being pointed at is different from others which may seem similar to it. If you win a stuffed ...


22

It's not correct English as you intend it. "This" and "Your" are determiners, and specifically referring determiners. And you only use one referring determiner at a time. This pen My pen the pen But not This my pen My the pen The this pen This can also be a pronoun, meaning "this thing". It could be used as : This, your pen, is beautiful....


21

All your examples are grammatically correct. I haven't collected statistics but I'd guess "her homework" is most commonly used. You could certainly say that "her" is not required, as the reader is unlikely to suppose that she does someone else's homework. I have an intuitive feel that "she does homework every day" sounds like it's saying that she has a lot ...


19

Using the instead of my in "the wife" does subtly change the meaning of a sentence it's used in. Assuming the woman in question is the wife of the speaker, compare It's my wife on the phone. to It's the wife on the phone. Using the instead of my puts a bit of social distance between the speaker and their wife. Even if the listener knows that the ...


17

Underwear, like trousers or jeans, are referred to as a pair, because it's a throwback to when pants (pantaloons) originally came in two pieces - a matching pair. A person would put on one leg, tie it around their waist, then put on the other leg and do the same. For more information, there is an excellent thread in EL&U, which references the following ...


17

Our last week's meeting is a little akward, but I for one do not think that it is incorrect. The answer by Tanner Swett says "it's never acceptable for a noun phrase to have more than one determiner." However, the Wikipedia article lists eight different "common" cases where multiple determiners are acceptable. Specifically: A definite determiner ...


15

In general, we tend to use the as an article for nouns and proper nouns where it is clear from context that only one thing belongs to that description (or when we are talking about the archetypal thing of a set of things in the abstract). Otherwise we would normally use a to signify that we mean a single element out of a group of things that all fit the ...


14

"Red color" is unnatural because the color red isn't red. Instead, it's just called red. Think about it: A color has no color. It is a color but it does not have a color, like for example cars or balloons do. So a color can't be red. And that's why there's no red color. There's just the color red. Compare color vs. paint. "Red paint" is ok because red paint ...


13

A simple rule of thumb is, when you're talking about a noun that has a restrictive clause on it, use 'the'; if you're talking about an unrestricted noun, don't use 'the'. An "unrestricted noun" talks about an entire group; a noun with a restrictive clause talks only about some subset of the group. In your first example, "Americans" is an unrestricted ...


13

Could you please give me some example of a more correct form of this kind of expression? This is tricky. Some nouns are mass nouns, meaning they can be regarded as plural, even in their singular form. We see this a lot with food and drink, and the construct in your question works just fine: Let's eat some rice. Let's drink some milk. Other times, we ...


13

You can call it a hundred million million million. The three million in a row can be a bit confusing, which is why the word trillion was invented. Trillion is a contraction of tri (meaning three) and million. That would make the name a hundred trillion. Unfortunately some languages including English have redefined the word trillion to mean 1 000 000 000 ...


13

In English, we use a before words that sound like they begin with consonants. We saw a book on the table. There is a spider on your shoulder. Some words begin with vowels, but when pronounced phonetically, sound like they start with a consonant: The main character is a unicorn. (YOU-ni-corn) The third number is a one. (WUHN) We use an ...


12

Yes, you can, but in the context of your second sentence it makes more sense. Two zoo workers are talking: A. That old tiger can't be dangerous, it's hardly got any teeth left. B. Look, any tiger is a dangerous animal. Always treat them with respect. In a similar way, you can say While most are not serious, emergency room workers treat any ...


11

one hundred quintillion You can try all sorts of numbers on a site like this: http://saythenumber.com/?n=k2Y


11

In English we can only have one central Determiner in a noun phrase. Determiners are usually words like a, the, no, some, any, which, my, your, his, her and so forth. Because we can only have one of these words in a noun phrase we cannot say things like: *a my friend *that your friend *which Bob's friend? The noun phrases above are all ungrammatical in ...


11

When using a cardinal number to form a noun phrase you can always use the definite article to identify a specific instance of a number of things, in the same way as you would with any other noun phrase. Usually, you shouldn't use an indefinite article when using cardinal numbers with objects because the objects are usually plural, and the indefinite article ...


10

Question #1 is simple: Yes. She got out of bed. Yes, that can mean that she got off her bed of laying there for some time. Question #2 is the tricky one. Answering questions that ask, "Can you do X in English?" is difficult, because there are several factors at play. Depending on what X is, the answer is often: 1) Yes, you can – but that doesn't mean ...


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