16

No. The three sentences all mean different things. Half of an apple is eaten means there was one half of an apple, and all of that one-half is eaten. Picture someone cutting an apple into two halves; one half has been put aside and is not being discussed. The other half is what we are talking about, and it is entirely eaten. An apple is half eaten means ...


10

"There is still little milk in the glass." I think this is grammatically sound, but it's not idiomatic. It's not something we're likely to say. It sounds very awkward. We would say "There's still only a little milk in the glass" - but this only makes sense if you were expecting someone to top it up. "There is still a little milk in ...


8

All three of your sentences are grammatically sound. There is still little milk in the glass has no grammar problem, but the usage is somewhat strange because "little" (with no indefinite article) means "not much." Usually we think of a glass of milk as being full, and then some milk is drunk and the level goes down; to say that there ...


4

In this kind of context, saying that something is true of "some" doesn't necessarily mean that what is being said does not apply to the others to a degree. I would take this particular example to mean that the 'some' referred to are especially beautiful, because "beautiful" is a 'strong' adjective associate with excellence or ...


3

They each have a car. They each have two cars. But I'd prefer "They have two cars each." But you can also say "Jack and Ryan each own cars." And then the number of cars that Jack has and Ryan has is not determined. It could be one or more than one.


3

Some consider both words in both... and conjunctions: The conjunctions should be carefully positioned and their conjoined elements should be well balanced. That is, what follows both and what follows and should have the same grammatical form. whereas others differentiate them: Both is paired with and to add emphasis to two coordinated elements in a ...


2

In an informal style, we sometimes mix singular and plural forms when we use demonstratives with kind, sort or type. I don’t like those kind of boots. I got this from Practical English Usage, by Michael Swan, which I consider a great source. Its approach to language is descriptive, rather than prescriptive. That is real usage, but it can make things ...


2

I'm not much good at knitting -> correct because it's a negative use of "much". I'm very much aware of the problem. -> correct because "much" is part of "very much". There are some cases where it seems grammatical. For example, "he was much annoyed" is fine. But that's probably because "annoyed" is both ...


2

No, the second version is not correct. The word "such" is being used here to specify that "other copies" only applies to copies that have the same timestamp suffix. A more explicit version would be "with other timestamped copies of the same file".


2

If you have any query whatsoever - it doesn't matter what it is - please ask me. whatever = whatsoever (whatsoever's emphasis is greater than whatever's) whatsoever is the stressed version of whatever whatever is used frequently after nouns combined with no, any, all. ex) There is no doubt whatever/whatsoever. Is there any chance whatever/whatsoever?


2

We were both tired. There is no determiner. "Tired" is an adjective. But the word "both" can be a determiner: Both cats were black, which I took as an omen. We have both seen the movie. Find the determiner. It is the definite article: the.


2

The expression is of all time, meaning that something is the best example of its kind there has ever been. All time refers (in a somewhat exaggerated way) to the whole of history, not to different 'times'. All times and all the time(s) are not possible in this context.


2

But your examples are not followed by plurals: “Every five steps forward are followed by ten steps back.” “Every few months of peace are followed by months of unrest.” "Few" and "five" are not plurals. As they effectively count, or group the number of steps/months, they are acting as collectives. When you refer to anything that is ...


2

We don't normally use halved adjectivally - it's far more common as the past participle of the verb to halve = to reduce something to half of what it was OR to divide something into two halves. There are a few contexts where it's used as an adjective - for example... ...but in general it's probably better to just use half (with or without the optional ...


2

The sentence is fine as it is. The definite article, as you suggest, is only used when something is either unique (which a knife is not) or if it is something previously referred to. So, if the wider text from which your quote comes had already mentioned the knife and who it belongs to, then that is the only context in which you might insert the definite ...


2

Both are valid and correct. The second might be slightly more natural. The second one might carry a slight emphasis on how desperate you are to get them (though the first one is already implying the same hurry). It's like a reduced version of "Is there any way, even if it's not easy or obvious, even if you already told me it's impossible, any way under ...


2

Examples: Walking is very good for you. Running is also good for you. Believe it or not, working is also good for you. OK, so, if you want to discuss "how much" of all this is good for you, there are several ways to do that. You can add the following adjectives: "much", or "a lot of", or "lots of", or "frequent&...


1

Good question. This is tricky. There is a construction "both X and Y"/"either X or Y"/"neither X nor Y" which emphasizes that there are two things being coordinated. (There is no corresponding "all X, Y, and Z" construction.) "All" and "both" can precede the definite article, in which case they ...


1

It's a continuum and I doubt you'll find clear dividing lines, but the progression goes like this: Little traffic. Very few cars on the road. You can proceed at full speed. A little traffic (synonym: some traffic). There are some cars on the road, and occasionally you have to slow down or get delayed at a stoplight longer than if there was no one else ...


1

activity can be countable (when it describes a specific event or entertainment) or uncountable (when it means doing something). One could argue that religious activity could therefore be countable or uncountable. Are we required to attend any religious activity weekly? The word attend suggests that we talking about events, so activity should really be ...


1

I haven't a thing is more emphatic. It can be interpreted as I don't have even one (single) thing. I simply haven't any thing(anything) is more neutral. It only states the lack of possession.


1

We do this with all sorts of verbs. I get hungry often He gets hungry often They get hungry often Usually we conjugate verbs with singular subjects with an s. So: One of the computers needs updating All of the computers need updating None of the computers need updating Note: "Any of the computers needs updating" sounds very awkward. I'm not ...


1

The contradiction is in English usage. I would put it something like this: Normally "between" requires a plural or compound object. However, in the particular case of "between each" a singular object is often used. The phrase "between each house" can be thought of as shorthand for "between each house and the next", but ...


1

"They have cars" or "They each have cars" is grammatical, but does not specify how many cars each person has—only that each of them has at least one car. This is a natural thing to say if the number isn't relevant. For instance, as a response to "Does Jack or Ryan need a ride?"—"No, they have cars." Technically, "...


1

Just use "a quarter circle". Example https://study.com/academy/lesson/quarter-circles-calculating-area-perimeter-radius.html


1

While on the face of it your friend is the one who is twenty years old, the sentence can be understood the other way. Context would be important. If a heavy banging on the door is heard and somebody asks "Who is that?" then your sentence would not be understood to mean your 20yo friend's toddler son. If clarity is needed without context I would ...


1

Summary answer quoting comments from @fumblefingers, @ronald-sole and @kate-bunting. Yes, it is always the case with a noun identified by a number. Concise explanation to understand the reason of that: You should focus on understanding exactly what a determiner is. In your context, the numbers 5 and 7 are determiners, which is why we don't need to include ...


1

Without the "our" a literal reading of This data is coherent with chemical intuition, because the exo form is less sterically hindered. is perhaps problematical. It's not clear who has the intuition. But if I saw the sentence written that way I would easily and unthinkingly infer that the intuition belonged to chemists. (The pedant in me would ...


1

Can I just say "The nation is holding breath" No. Hopefully someone will be able to provide a better explanation of the grammar. But the way I think of it is: "breath" needs to belong to someone/something - it doesn't exist on its own. So you need to specify that the breath the nation is holding is its own. The appropriate pronoun for ...


1

You are right that any adds emphasis to the fact of not having siblings, and would be more commonly used standing alone. For instance as in a simple factual reply in a conversation. Using any with this kind of negative statement is also especially preferred in response to a question, or an assertion by someone else to the contrary.


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