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Some consider both words in both... and conjunctions: The conjunctions should be carefully positioned and their conjoined elements should be well balanced. That is, what follows both and what follows and should have the same grammatical form. whereas others differentiate them: Both is paired with and to add emphasis to two coordinated elements in a ...


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Since they are both hypotheticals, they both work the same. Technically, a way is asking for one possible way, while any way suggests there are many possible ways. They both seem to be non-literal ways to ask the question: Can you send me the documents earlier? because this statement can sound like a command, so people will use "is there a/any way&...


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Both are valid and correct. The second might be slightly more natural. The second one might carry a slight emphasis on how desperate you are to get them (though the first one is already implying the same hurry). It's like a reduced version of "Is there any way, even if it's not easy or obvious, even if you already told me it's impossible, any way under ...


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You could rewrite 'the fathers and mothers' as 'the fathers and the mothers', but you can't write 'both Jack and both Jane'. You seem to be trying to compare apples with oranges :) "Both...and..." is a linking phrase composed of the two conjunctions the first one of which explicitly incorporates the idea two or more following things that all are ...


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Any has nothing to do with the verb, so tense is irrelevant. All of the following are acceptable, past present and future: She didn't find any of the coins. We don't find any problem with your work. I won't have any time tomorrow to do that. It is the logic of sentences 2 and 3 that are at fault. Since they're in the past, it is not any one question, but ...


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Good question. This is tricky. There is a construction "both X and Y"/"either X or Y"/"neither X nor Y" which emphasizes that there are two things being coordinated. (There is no corresponding "all X, Y, and Z" construction.) "All" and "both" can precede the definite article, in which case they ...


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