7

The two do not mean the same thing, and only "go from" is correct in that context. To "go from there" means to use that as a starting point. In this case, it means we'll start with the measurements of the piece of baggage to determine whether it will fit in the trunk. To "go off of X" means to use X as an alternative basis for ...


6

"go from there" can refer to any discussion where the details are unknown and still to be clarified. Tell me what colors you like, and we can go from there. [decide on a product or thing.] "go off something", besides the meaning of to stop taking some drug or other, means to start with a specific measurement as the first step. "The ...


5

First of all, when 'land' refers to a country, we say that a person lives 'in' that land, not 'on' it. To be honest, both 'far-away land' and 'far-flung land' are pretty much interchangeable. I should note that both are very non-specific, and are not likely to be used in a serious piece of writing. These days, you are more likely to only hear such terms in ...


5

The first question is asking how you feel about the job. For example: are you enjoying it, or are you unhappy with it? The second question is asking how you are doing with your job. For example: are you having trouble with work, or are you making good progress?


3

The word "but" is not always a conjunction. The first definition under 'ADVERB' at Lexico is No more than; only. If you substitute "only" or "no more than" for "but" the meanings become clear: 'tis only a scratch I am no more than a small voice Nowadays this adverbial usage is most often seen in "to name but a ...


3

"During" means within that time period, simultaneous with it. "Throughout" means over the whole duration, from start to end. The action does not have to be continuous or constant, but it has to take place one or more times over the whole time period. Note: in weather reports, meteorologists have a somewhat specialized jargon, and they ...


3

As you can see from this definition at Macmillan, the phrasal verb pass on has a special meaning: to give someone something that someone else has given you So when you pass the pepper to me, the meaning is more general. You might have received it from someone else first, or you might have been the one to the lift the pepper from the table before passing it ...


3

Sentence 1. is correct and natural. By the definition you've linked, "namely" means "you want to give more detail or be more exact about something you have just said". In this case, "A, B and C" gives more detail about "three subjects". Sentences 2. and 3. are incorrect, and for the same reason. For sentence 2., by the ...


2

In this context, you have support/sponsorship on one YouTube video. Differences: "Sponsored by" would be more like a bigger company paying you for the video, and they're usually responsible for the video. Let's say that somebody is filming a video for the sponsored company, and the sponsored company also uses it. "Supported by" doesn't ...


2

You normally buy something from a retailer (someone whose business involves selling stuff). If you buy something off someone, there's usually an implication that the person you bought it from isn't normally a "trader" AND/OR that you had to "persuade" them to part with the thing in exchange for your money (you "haggled"). This [...


2

"Close up" is synonymous to "right next to" or "right in front". "Close" is synonymous to "near" or "nearby". Examples: "He was close up to the television" means he was only inches away. "He was close to the television" means he wasn't far from it but most likely a foot or two ...


2

"No taller than" is probably more common (at least in American English) in this context, but they're both possible. The strange thing is that, at least in my opinion, "no __er than" generally emphasizes that the two things being compared are close. For example, when you say, "Andrew is no smarter than Bruce," it suggests to me ...


1

I think "My sole is tickling" means it is currently happening since -ing word forms are usually a present participle. However, "My sole is ticklish" means that it is a daily occurrence and it means your foot is usually ticklish all the time.


1

"Namely" when you are naming or listing the thing or things. That works best in your context. "That is" is used to introduce a clarification or explanation. The exam contains three subjects, that is there are three different topics that will be assessed, but you won't get three papers. "I.e" is a Latin phrase meaning "that ...


1

The exam includes three subjects, namely A, B and C. This is perfectly colloquial. The word "namely" introduces the labels. The exam includes three subjects. i.e. A, B and C. "i.e." is not used to introduce new information but to clarify, explain or rephrase something. For example: The cyclist told the policeman he was an idiot, i.e. the ...


1

The only difference is a very slight emphasis of time. You could use either quite properly and be understood correctly. The "it is" form means that the journey is 500 miles long right now. That is, it is referring to the geographical arrangement of roads right now. The "it is going to be" form means that the conditions when the journey ...


1

Neither one of your sentences is quite correct. It is not common, and sounds odd, to refer to lectures as “teacher lectures.” You could say, “Whose lectures are you providing?” This is correct because “Whose” already indicates a possessive. If you don’t use “whose,” you would have to indicate the possessive. You could say “What (or Which) teacher’s lectures ...


1

"in the past years" is uncommon compared to "in past years" or the more common "in the past few years". It sounds like a mish-mash of the other two. "In past years" is usefully vague referring to some years: not necessarily recent or successive ones. "in the past few years" means a number of recent, ...


1

Both ..., right? and ..., correct? are laconic. The first is informal and, to my ageing UK ears, American, though it's widely used here now. The second is less colloquial and is somewhat brusque: like an army officer questioning his men. If instead you were to ask, in a new sentence, "Is that right/correct?" it would be colloquial, less brusque and ...


1

No, the meanings are different and using "go" breaks the idiomatic meaning of "take to the streets". The sense of "take to the streets" is to make protests, demonstrations and riots in an attempt to change something. Changing it to "go" loses that meaning. Compare "take to the airwaves" or "take to the ...


1

Yes, "take to X" means "go to X", but it doesn't only mean "go to X", it means something like "go to X with the specific intention of occupying X." For example, I might say I went to the greenmarket to get turnips but never I took to the greenmarket to get turnips On the other hand, I took to the hills would mean ...


1

Both fine. If there is a difference I'd understand the first to mean "I visited members of my family, or they came to visit me". And the second to mean "I stayed at home with my parents/spouse/children." Compare Did you celebrate with friends? / No, I celebrated New Year's with family. Did you go out? / No, I celebrated New Year's ...


1

You've almost nailed it. In your first set, you get it right. "to make a beeline for" means "to go straight to without hestitation". To "make a beeline for" doesn't mean the same as "go quickly (up) to", so the two sentences about the "hot girl" don't mean the same thing. The first means "went quickly in ...


1

To "look close up" is to get physically near to something when examining it. To "look closely" is to examine it very carefully. Not necessarily literally from a small distance. You could say, "I looked closely at the Moon." The sentence, "Now that I could see him closely ..." is an unlikely thing for a fluent speaker ...


1

I'm assuming you're trying to compare the two structures: [ "take" + length of time + "to" + base form verb ] [ "be"-verb + length of time + "in the making" ] In that case, the two sentences have the same meaning. The first sentence is neutral style with no nuance. The second has a poetic or narrative style, and ...


1

Since I can answer but not comment on the answer, let me rephrase this as a new answer: See the above mentioned Wikipedia article. A brace is a curly bracket, but not all brackets are braces. Think of bracket as the general term for the opening and closing things, and brace (or curly bracket) as the special characters {} (), [] and <> are also brackets,...


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