11

In American English, it's common to refer to such a place as "the doctor's office" or even just "the doctor". Such places may be officially called something like "Offices of Dr. Jones, MD". The word "clinic" should also be pretty widely understood as different from a hospital. It might have a connotation of being a place that focuses more on one specific ...


6

“Soon” is a measure of time relative to the starting point; “early” is a measure of time relative to the ending point. If someone left only a few minutes after arrival you would say “why are you leaving so soon?”. This could be even if it is already the scheduled end time. If someone left long before the scheduled end time you would say “why are you leaving ...


4

Chase down is a phrasal verb meaning: to follow and catch (someone or something): Police chased down the robber in an alley. to search for and find (someone or something): I finally chased down that recipe I promised you. I chased him down at his old hangout. Whereas, Chase is a word which could be used in different ways. As a verb: ...


4

In Britain, a clinic is a place where outpatients go for an ongoing medical condition to be monitored, or to receive regular sessions of treatment. It's usually a specialist department in a hospital. A GP practice usually calls its building a surgery (not very logical, I know). If it is under the same roof with other healthcare services (such as a pharmacy ...


4

Just "shuffle" (not "shuffle up") is the idiomatic way to say you have mixed a deck of playing cards in preparation for a game or card trick: I have shuffled the cards. "Muddled up" can mean a different kind of "mixed up" - it can mean confused.


3

In the US, we (at least those of us of certain age) would call the item in your picture "roller blades" or "inline skates". Traditional roller skates have the wheels positioned like a car (two wheels side-by-side in the front and back).


3

There are two perspectives that you have to understand in order to answer this question for yourself. One perspective is from someone "of faith", a believer in God or any higher power. The other perspective is from an Athiest and more scientific point of view. Opinion A: "Faith is different from superstition." This article, written by a Christian has this ...


3

Relax is more of a "slow down and take it easy" mode while rest is usually used to mean to literally stop whatever you are doing at the moment. So in your example sentence, I would likely assume if you use relax, that you did something as a hobby, for example, watching TV or reading a book. Using rest there, I would assume you took a nap or just sat there ...


2

A grave is specifically a burial site. A stone recording the deceased person's name can be called a gravestone or tombstone. As you say, tomb usually implies a more elaborate memorial structure. The fact that the deceased lived long ago is not part of the definition, but for the last century or so it hasn't been the custom to put up such showy memorials. ...


2

I think the verb "insult" does not apply to the "mass". Let's think about the examples like below. Jeff insulted Tom. (It's OK) Jeff offended Tom (OK) Whereas, Jeff insulted the United Kingdom (? How? Is Jeff a president of some country or some existence bigger than the UK?) Jeff offended the United Kingdom (Sounds OK. Jeff's word or action ...


2

Logical nonsense perhaps. Most language is illogical. "Caretaker" is a fairly old word, it means someone who "takes care" of a house or particularly a school. It could, I suppose, be generalised in a story to someone who takes care of a whole planet. You should understand "care" here means "charge, oversight, attention or heed with a view to safety or ...


2

Unfortunately, the teacher is incorrect. Immigration is moving to another non-native country. For instance, you live in India and apply for Permanent Residence to Canada, then you file for immigration. We have professional immigration consultants. On the other hand, emigration is going out of a country. See the fun - when you get your PR to Canada, you ...


2

"Emigrate" is not used when discussing moving from one place to another within the same country. I would say that "move" is appropriate in that context. "Emigrate"/"Immigrate" are used when talking about different countries. Let's say you are currently living in Australia but you are going to go and live in South Africa. You would then be emigrating from ...


2

Immigrate is entering a country. Emigrating is leaving it.


2

As a Canadian, we use "put" in most instances where an American would use "set". The exception would be a stock phrase, such as "set the table." I have noticed since moving to the States that everyone here uses the word "set" where a Canadian would use "put". For Instance: "Where is my hair brush?" Oh! I set it on your dresser!" Or "where should I set ...


2

In AmE (at least in New England, but this could be regional) a clinic typically refers to an outpatient treatment or diagnostic center. Hospitals may contain clinics, but clinics are not hospitals. Doctors may also have private offices that are not associated with hospitals or clinics. Someone seeking treatment, diagnosis, therapy, or advice might say they ...


2

As is already pointed out in the comments from @Michael: The best answer you are going to get will be based on the dictionary meanings of 'molest', e.g. (Cambridge Dictionary) "to touch or attack someone in a sexual way against their wishes", and "to touch, push, etc. someone violently" From this, we can infer that rape is a type of molestation, but not ...


2

Your definition of rainy means 'a period when there are frequent showers' (a lot doesn't refer to heavy rain). So if rain is falling now we say "It is raining". There is normally 'some light from the sun' in the daytime. A sunny day is when the sun is strong and there are few clouds in the sky. "It has sunlight" is not idiomatic English. We can say "The sun ...


2

They do mean the same thing, however, the first is much more idiomatic. What they mean is that, of all of the female presidents elected in 2019, she was the first. One other thing I'll mention is that these have a completely different meaning to something like: She was the first female president [of some country], and was elected in 2019. Elected ...


2

Speaking as an American, I have never before heard the term "skate shoe". I've always heard "roller skates", or "skates" for short. Note that "skates" can also be short for "ice skates". The phrase is almost always used in the plural, like "I put on my roller skates" or "I put on a pair of roller skates". I suppose if you lost one of the pair, you might ...


2

There's not much difference. The first has a simple literal meaning. The second says that he is "sitting" so we suppose that he is not doing much. He isn't standing at the bars protesting his innocence or being interviewed by the police. He isn't meeting his lawyer to plan his defence. He is just sitting there. It isn't a particularly common phrase. There ...


2

The verbs rest and relax are so near-synonyms that it takes one of them to explain the other: To rest means to relax, sleep or do nothing after a period of activity or illness; to not use a part of your body for some time The doctor told me to rest. Rest your eyes every half an hour. I awoke feeling rested and refreshed. To relax means to rest by ...


2

Wouldn't have is hypothetical. Won't have is real. "I can't believe I got the final question in the pop quiz wrong." "I wouldn't have known the answer either." The first person took the quiz, and they can't believe they got the final question wrong. The second person would have gotten the question wrong too if they had taken the quiz (instead of the ...


2

The verbs are open and close. I open a door, then I close the door. Doors open and close. The past participles are opened and closed. The adjectives are open and closed. The door is open or is closed. (Note that "close" can also be an adjective, but with a different meaning, namely the opposite of far. "The door is close" means the door is nearby, not far ...


2

"Cost effective" means that it is good value. It has a very "business English" style. If you say the train is "cost effective" you are saying that you or your company will can increase your profits by using the train compared to other forms of transport. "Affordable" means that something is quite cheap. Literally it means that many people would be able to ...


2

"Inheritance" is possibly the broadest word of the three. It can refer to anything that is passed to people from previous generations, including physical possessions left in a last will and testament, biological traits, and sometimes intangible things such as a responsibility, state or condition. Examples: I inherited my father's house. I inherited my ...


1

This is a roller skate. The wheels pivot together when the skate is leaned, like a skateboard does. Lean right: the front wheel assembly twists clockwise when viewed from above, the rear counter clockwise, like 4 wheel steering on a car. And then there's the strap on roller skates we had as kids in the 1960s, no practical way to stop except for taking a ...


1

You could "muddle up" the cards in an old fashioned card index because the cards in the index have to be in the right order for the index to be useful. In the case of playing cards they are supposed to be in a random order for the game to be played. You do this by "shuffling" them. "Muddling up" something is never a good thing so the difference is in the ...


1

Neither is ideal. Both "warming" and "heating" are used as verbs that operate on an object, for example: John is heating his soup. John is the subject, soup is the object, and it is the soup which is actually getting heated. When you omit an object, it may still be assumed that there is one, for example: Soup is warming. This can mean that soup has ...


1

They are two different questions. What is your life like in two words? Here you are being asked to describe your life, its qualities, your subjective experience of it, etc. Given that you're being asked to do it in two words, the questioner is likely expecting some kind of snappy, creative, answer, almost like a headline. What is your life in two ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible