17 votes

Is there any difference between a heavy meal and a large meal, between a light meal and a small meal?

"Heavy" with regards to food doesn't mean the same as "large". A large salad, for example, might be considered a light meal - light on calories, light on the digestive system. We ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 102k
13 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

This is enormously family dependent, and rapidly changing. Words like "scamp" or "rapscallion" or "scalliwag" now seem rather dated. "Cheeky monkey" seemed ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
10 votes
Accepted

Are "unloaded" and "not loaded" interchangeable?

Un- as a prefix on a verb (eg unload) refers to reversing the activity. Un- as a prefix on an adjective merely says that the adjective does not apply, or that the reverse of the adjective applies, ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.5k
6 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

Out of those rascal is common enough to be understood (if still a little old-fashioned) and the most likely to be affectionate out of context. Most of those words are usually used to refer to adults ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
6 votes

Are "unloaded" and "not loaded" interchangeable?

You're right. They can be confusing, but it's more about emphasis and context than a strict grammatical rule. Not loaded: This is a neutral statement about the current state. It simply means there's ...
Ali E's user avatar
  • 865
4 votes

"The sight of her rendered him speechless." — Why place "her" after nouns? Why not say just "Her sight rendered him speechless."?

"her sight" could mean the ability of sight that she possesses. When we talk about our senses we might say "my sight, my hearing" etc. That isn't the case with all senses - for ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 102k
3 votes

Are "unloaded" and "not loaded" interchangeable?

Both phrases can be used to mean "never was" or "was but it has been undone". For example, if I say "The order is not boxed", I probably mean that it never was in a box. ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Why do they use 'persons' rather than 'people' here?

The use of persons is possible in very formal context: Persons (plural) is a very formal word. We only use it in rather legalistic contexts: [notice in a lift] Any person or persons found in ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

"beg, plead, entreat, implore, beseech, appeal" What is the different and when to use

This kind of question could attract different opinions. But, as all these words carry pretty much the same meaning, I think you should consider how and when to use them based on their formality and ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 102k
2 votes

He had problems reading without glasses. In the above sentence is 'reading' a present participle or a gerund in this sentence

In "He had problems reading without glasses." reading is a gerund-participle. In traditional grammar, it was a gerund.
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes

"The sight of her rendered him speechless." — Why place "her" after nouns? Why not say just "Her sight rendered him speechless."?

A proper alternative would be "Seeing her rendered him speechless", again it is what the sensing person is seeing.
SoronelHaetir's user avatar
2 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

Some possibilities would be "scamp" or "terror". Note, phrases like this would usually be used as an exclamation, rather than as full sentences: You little scamp! You terror!
Daniel Roseman's user avatar
2 votes

difference between [worked at A warehouse and A manufacturing plant] vs [worked at A warehouse and A manufacturing plant]

I would interpret the first sentence to refer to two different companies and jobs, one a warehouse, the other a manufacturing plant, and the second to refer to a single company and job, a company that ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.6k
2 votes

Is there any nuance between "wildflower" and "wild flower"?

"Wild" as an adjective has a range of senses, many of which don't apply to flowers. It can mean "not domesticated". And in this sense it has exactly the same meaning as wild ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
2 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

I used to read and hear imp, it sounds almost cute but perhaps it's not so common nowadays. She's [a bit of] an imp This tells the listener that the small child sometimes misbehaves. I believe ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.2k
1 vote

Is there any nuance between "wildflower" and "wild flower"?

There is no notable difference between wildflower and wild flower. It's a fairly common occurrence for English speakers to combine (or sometimes separate) words that appear together. Because there ...
fatalerrer's user avatar
1 vote

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

It seems to be BrE-specific, but the first word that came to mind for me was "tyke". From Cambridge dictionary: a child who behaves badly in a way that is funny rather than serious
Especially Lime's user avatar
1 vote

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

A pretty non offensive, endearing way to refer to a misbehaving child is to replace their name with 'Trouble'. You can also use it when they are not misbehaving at the moment but often tend to. I once ...
Judith Jones's user avatar
1 vote

What is the difference between a final draft and a final version?

They would pretty much mean the same thing. When working on an essay (for example) you create a first draft. You improve, edit or rewrite, that is your second draft. You improve the second draft, ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
1 vote
Accepted

Usage of In ,for and within

None of these are valid. 1, and 3 are strange and no-idiomatic (I can't work out what these mean) 2. means that he became tall two years ago and is still tall now. The main mistake is to use "...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
1 vote

"The sight of her rendered him speechless." — Why place "her" after nouns? Why not say just "Her sight rendered him speechless."?

Compare I tried some of that fermented food. The taste of it made me retch. The fire was burning furiously. The heat of it singed my eyebrows. The preposition of can express the idea that the ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
1 vote

Does the verb "to wear someone down/out" mean far more tiredness than the adjective "wearisome"?

No Tiredness is not implicit in either phrase but for some complex reasons. First, weary and tired are not exact synonyms. While weary can mean very tired, it can also mean bored through overexposure ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 617
1 vote

"They ventured nervously into the water." & "He nervously ventured out onto the ice."— Difference between "ventured nervously" & "nervously ventured"?

They ventured nervously into the water. They nervously ventured into the water. For both pairs, each example means the same as its counterpart, but ventured nervously is more common than nervously ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Cut off and cutoff/cut-off

You're right that "cutoff" is a closed compound noun. "Cut off" can be used as a verb phrase; however, Cambridge Dictionary notes that 'cut-off' (hyphenated) is an acceptable form ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 102k

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