21

Concurrently refers to coincident or overlapping spans of time, as in the example of the two prison sentences. Simultaneously can refer to a single moment in time. The phrase at the same time is a more general phrase that describes both of the other two terms.


7

The abbreviation "etc." stands for "et cetera" which is Latin for "and the rest". But its common meaning in English also include "and so on". So these two terms, "et cetera" and "and so on" are basically equivalent. Using one vs. the other is a matter of style more than anything else. If I had to ...


3

Everyone as a single word means 'all the people who are/were present' or sometimes 'people in general' (as in your second example). If you write it as two words, or say it with more stress on one, is means 'each individual'. Every one of my children has a different interest.


3

I gotta go This is an example of colloquial ellipsis, where words are omitted in informal speech. The complete sentence should be I have got to go According to the Cambridge Dictionary, have got to is just another way of saying have to, so this means exactly the same as I have to go "I gotta go" is much more informal.


3

Those mean two different things. He may be cheerful outside... This means that he is outdoors/not inside a building, so saying He may be cheerful outside, but that’s not how he feels. would get you strange looks from native speakers


3

Yes. Of course everyone and everything has a measurable temperature, but the idiom "to have a temperature" means exactly "to have a fever," that is to say an abnormally high temperature.


3

"Party pooper" is a little bit childish, but not so much that it doesn't see common use. "Killjoy" is just a little more formal than "wet blanket". All three would be readily understood and sound natural in conversational English. Subjectively, I feel that a killjoy usually just sucks the fun out of an activity, while a party ...


3

You use nor with neither: Since there's neither warning nor error thrown, I assume it's valid AHK code? You use or with no: Since there's no warning or error thrown, I assume it's valid AHK code? Normally, when you make a question, you [invert][1] the subject and auxiliary verb. A question without inversion is is indicated only by intonation. Section 32 ...


3

In Latin, 'simul' (simultaneous) means "together, at the same time". In Latin, 'concurrentem' (concurrent) means "to happen at the same time". Concurrent connotes there being no relation other than a temporal one. Simultaneous DOES connote there being a relation other than just temporally. You could be simultaneously babysitting and ...


3

Harry looked great. He had been wearing his new suit. To me those sentences imply that Harry had stopped wearing his new suit at the time he was seen to be looking great. The past perfect continuous puts the wearing in the past of another event that is in the speaker's past, and the only event referred to is the time he was seen. Compare Harry looked great....


2

“Come over here” is just slightly on the “polite” side, while “get over here” is just slightly on the “rude” side. The difference between them is not very large, and you could probably make “get over here” sound somewhat polite by saying “please” and using a gentle tone of voice. Likewise, you could also say “come over here” in a very harsh tone of voice. ...


2

As you say, the terms are all similar, and their definitions are somewhat circular. In many cases they can all be used interchangeably... but in many other cases using the wrong one will make your sentence sound "off" to a native ear. Here are are the nuances that I read into their meanings, at least some of the time: Ordinary means plain or ...


2

There are two different structures here. Less The structure of the larger phrase is "The more X, the less Y". This is similar to "the more the merrier". We are describing the diminishing of something as another thing is increasing (or a variation of this). "The more east we go, the less X matters" "The more east we go, the ...


2

They're pretty much synonymous. As the-baby-is-you says, "party pooper" is a phrase that children use more than adults, or if an adult uses it, it is more light-hearted than the others.


2

"In style" primarily means that something is currently fashionable. For example, you might say that a particular item of clothing is "in style". "With style" typically means that some thought, design, or flair has been put into something. For example, if you do something 'with style' it may be impressive, or look good. Note also ...


2

"None", although a pronoun, could be considered a substitute for the number zero: Two of my children are boys One of my children is a boy None of my children are boys. It doesn't just relate to people - it can be used for anything. "No one" means 'no person', so that can only relate to people. The "one" here acts like the ...


2

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, "sanitizing" only kills bacteria while "disinfecting" kills both bacteria and viruses. See also this Merriam-Webster article on the difference between "clean," "sanitize," and "disinfect." At a guess, the difference is the sort of thing that most ordinary ...


2

No. Lexico differentiates them by severity and formality. temperature 1.2 informal A body temperature above the normal. and fever 1 An abnormally high body temperature, usually accompanied by shivering, headache, and in severe instances, delirium. For me, the difference is that a 'temperature' is inconvenient or uncomfortable, whereas a 'fever' is ...


2

in the last year relates to the period of time between 365 days ago and now. It is generally only used about multiple events or a continuous situation during that period. last year relates to the period from 1st January last year to 31st December last year. It can be used to specify approximately when a single event or multiple events occurred.


2

Quote from Singular “They” - APA Style: The singular “they” is a generic third-person singular pronoun in English. Use of the singular “they” is endorsed as part of APA Style because it is inclusive of all people and helps writers avoid making assumptions about gender. Although usage of the singular “they” was once discouraged in academic writing, ...


2

I do not think there is a grammatical difference. It depends on your beliefs and how you perceive your spirituality. "Before God" has the imagery of standing in judgement or supplication to a person (or being) who is sitting there watching you, as in "an audience before the King"—picture the King sitting on a throne which is raised on a ...


2

Both are okay It depends on whether you want to emphasize the negation of the second item in the list When to Use 'Nor' (Quick and Dirty Tips): “Nor” doesn’t necessarily have to appear in a sentence with the word “neither.” “Nor” can start a sentence. How to Use Nor (wikiHow): Use "nor" with other negatives. Even though "nor" is almost ...


2

Neither of these makes any sense. I suspect you mean The wine is half drunk. which is possible, though I would think rather unusual. More natural would be Half the wine has been drunk. To explain: Drank is a simple past (eg He drank the wine) and cannot be part of any verb phrase with is. Drunk is the past participle, so it can be used to form a passive,...


1

Disinfect is the more 'traditional' word and suggests using disinfectant. The word sanitize has become popular more recently, and particularly during the pandemic. Personally, I associate it more with alcohol-based gels.


1

'In the presence of God' are the words that appear in the traditional wedding ceremony based on The Book of Common Prayer: Dearly beloved: We have come together in the presence of God to witness and bless the joining together of this man and this woman in Holy Matrimony. It may depend on your personal beliefs, but it may be that "in the presence of ...


1

They mean the same thing. As a British person, there's a very slight difference in what the phrases make me visualise but it's subjective. And it only really matters for descriptive language, because the two phrases have the exact same definition. Just think about other times you would use 'all over' and other times you would use 'throughout' and how that ...


1

If so, can I replay 'everything' with 'all' in the sentence 'We have completely different opinions. I disagree with everything she says.' I would say No, the reason being that all encompasses everything but it does not mean everything. The meaning of everything is all things. But all has different associations. We can however use all that In the example I'...


1

Tina and Mary watch as the reporter does a live report. Most likely this means that Tina and Mary are watching TV. Tina and Mary look on as the reporter does a live report. This means that Tina and Mary are at the location of the reporter doing the live report. You wouldn't use this one when watching TV.


1

Your second sentence is not technically passive. It is causative. I had X done. The subject is “I,” and the subject performed the implied action. You can express the meaning as follows I made the arrangements that caused X to be done. However, you are correct that a passive meaning applies to the doing of X I had Tom do my homework is not passive at ...


1

Some words can act both as nouns and units. As a unit, words don't use the plural A 5-metre rope / A 5-pound note / A 5-pint jug But they can also be nouns It is five metres long / I've five pounds in my pocket / The jug holds five pints. So you should say "A 100-metre race" but "The race is 100 metres long". However there is a fair ...


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