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1

Even though your dictionary doesn’t appear to make the distinction, I have never heard drift used in the sense of self-directed, meaning self-controlled movement. That is why it is used in connection with ocean currents. The current moves you without your input. Drift is also used in the sense of drifting off of ones intended course. Again, the movement is ...


-1

"To the extent where" sounds unnatural to me, and I would never say it. "To the extent that," on the other hand, is idiomatic, but I can't imagine a context in which I'd use the second sentence you've given as an example. I'd be likelier to say "where education is concerned, no major issues were reported" or – likelier still – "no major educational issues ...


12

Drift = to be carried along by currents of water or air, or by the force of circumstances (Dictionary.com). Wander = to go aimlessly, indirectly, or casually (Dictionary.com) Drifted means carried away when you do not fully control the situation. "The farmers drifted about England" means they were dependent on the job availability, so they "had to" go ...


0

We use THIS when the co-speaker doesn't have any information about the topic or the thing mentioned. However, use THAT when the speaker and his co-speaker are on the same page as to the thing mentionned.


2

You must not read such trash. Trash, meaning "something which is waste or of no value" is a non-count noun, so you would not use an article such as "a" before it. trash noun [ Uncountable ] anything that is worthless and of low quality; waste: Trash


0

In practical use, the difference in meaning is generally very slight, often there is no difference in meaning worth noting. "Connect to" suggests a primary thing and a secondard thing, or at least a difference in form, Connect the hose to the faucet. Connected the plug to the socket. "Connect with" suggests an equality or similarity of the ...


2

Your provided definition of speak to (and the answer given at the WordReference link) describes that meaning well: it's speaking about the truth. In contrast, to speak the truth just means to say something that is true. "Two plus two is four." I am speaking the truth. "People say that two plus two is four. They say this because . . ." I am speaking to ...


2

First of all, you can't can "I have find." You are trying to use the Present Perfect tense, aren't you? So, "I have found a good friend in you" is grammatical, unlike "I have find... ." Now the question is what's the difference between the present simple (I have) and the present perfect (I have found). Well, if you say "I have a friend," you are talking ...


0

In business and economics, a price differential is a way of saying: The difference in price between two or more products or services or statistics. differential is the adjective for the noun, difference. a price differential = a difference in price. Those mean the same thing. The PRICE for product A = 50 euros The PRICE for product B = 75 euros Two ways ...


0

To start, heres a good reference: wordhippo.com Noun Travel Because: The noun travel can be countable or uncountable. It can be Plural and Non Plural. Travelling is also Countable and Uncountable in a Plural sense > Meaning it can be used to reference One person travelling, while also being used as "Travellings" to describe multiple people travelling. ...


1

One would be likely to say "John is suited to that job" or "That job is suited to John". (In either case "well-suited might be used instead". One might say or write: I would really like to find something more suitable. I would really like to find something more suited to me. I would really like to find something better suited to me. But I, at ...


0

"Students' Performances" means the performances of several different students. "Student Performances" mean multiple performances done as student exercises. The second could mean multiple performances by a single student. It could also mean performances by people who are in the role of a student, but are not actually students, because here "student" is an ...


1

There's nothing grammatically wrong with the sentence "How would you get so tan?" However, it wouldn't make sense in this context. Because we have the word would, this phrase would describe a hypothetical situation: Andrew: I'd like to go to Alice's pool party on Friday, but I'll only go if I can get as darkly tanned as Peter. Ben: How would you get so ...


0

"Sporting" generally means something different from "sports". I'm afraid this is another one of those cases where the expected usage of an English word can be different from its actual usage. "Sporting" is an adjective: sporting (adj): 1. connected with or interested in sports. "a major sporting event" 2. fair and generous in one's behavior or ...


1

Way back then - indicates something that happened in the past, but the time is usually specified in some previous instance. So it's like an additional form of wording to the previous already stated time. Way back when - refers to something that happened in the past, the time is not specified here by previous instances, and the word "when" symbolizes an ...


1

I wanted to come to your party but I couldn't I would have liked to come to your party but I couldn't. In current usage, there is little if any difference between these two. When discussing a current or future desire, "I would like to" is considered by many to be more polite than "I want". Many others do not make a distinction here.


1

Very straightforward: "I want doesn't get" - some people consider it rude to say that you 'want' something. It is considered more polite to state your preference rather than your demand. For some reason chief executives and suchlike are allowed to say "I want this company to be ...". Such words suggests urgency but in normal social life urgency is not ...


1

"You have been dishonest to me." is in the present perfect tense, which is used to describe something that happened in the past, but the exact time it happened is not important. It has a relationship with the present. (ecenglish.com) "You are dishonest to me." is in the present simple tense, which describes the current situation. You can also use "have ...


0

Personally, I would use mixed or jumbled in this context. As the dictionary definition you have given states: scramble implies the wrong order. This implies that the objects (or in this case people) you're referring to would need a specific order in the first place.


1

Functions can refer to a lot of things. There might be confusion if we are talking about functions and features in the context of products/marketing/technology. Functions describe what something does. It is goal based. It refers to what something does or is useful for. For example, one function of that smartphone is that it can be used to browse the ...


0

As a learner: "To understand electricity" is an infinitive clause. The infinitive clauses can take on the roles of a noun, or in other words you can treat them like a big noun when they are used as the subject! One form of making an infinitive clause is using "to + infinitive" pattern as the subject. For instance, To love and to be loved are the main ...


0

Your question is specific to the example: To Understand (a) electricity (b) depends (c) on a knowledge of atoms and the subatomic particles of which they are composed (d). In this version, "To understand" is trying to communicate "In order to Understand". So if I wanted to define the message of this sentence. In order "To Understand electricity" I must ...


1

Before can be used as an adjective, but its common use is as a conjunction ("A had achieved that before B did"). For this sentence, the emphasis can be achieved by using "way before B" or "long before B". You may want to consider the following alternatives: Person-2 has achieved this long ago (informal superlatives: long long ago, ages ago) - This is not a ...


3

How has a different meaning when it directly modifies an adjective. How different (in any context, I think) means "how big is the difference". In other contexts, how means "in what way". So, as direct questions: How are they different? means "In what way or ways are they different?", but How different are they? means "How great is the ...


0

(this is)... how they are different how they are different ... (is bla bla bla) This sounds like it should be part of a sentence explicitly explaining the differences (although it sounds a bit clumsy admitedly) This explains how different they are. How different they are! This could be used much the same, however, it could also just be a statement ...


0

Both sentences are grammatical, although they have different meanings. I think of Chatterton, the marvelous boy. This uses the marvelous boy as an appositive, a way of adding additional or clarifying information about Chatterton. The sentence has a main or independent clause (before the comma) and a dependent clause (after the comma). The main clause of ...


0

Best return on your money. This one is totally correct. "Return on" is a phrasal verb which means according to Longman Dictionary: The amount of profit that you get from something. That something would be determined if the preposition "from" was added before/after the prepositional phrase (i.e., "on" and its predicate). Your sentence, as a whole, ...


0

I think it depends on the surrounding information. One probable meaning might be: setting them as a figure to be followed.


1

as the marvelous boy describes your opinion of Chatterton. For example: How do you feel about Chatterton? Well I think of him as a marvelous boy. For the first sentence, the marvelous boy is used to specify which Chatterton you are talking about. It's like if you knew two people with the same name and you want to be specific: I think of John, the mailman, ...


3

In US use (in my experience) both have negative connotations. The word "mean" is far more often used in the sense of "cruel" or "nasty", and so when it is used to mean "unwilling to spend money" it picks up some of the negative attitude from that more common use. That would not affect "tight" so much, but the related from "tightfisted" is more negative. "...


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