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Most college vs Most colleges

Chungoli's comment to the question you linked is correct, but it doesn't apply to your example. Let's look at the example from the linked question (a bit simplified): Succeeding in college is often a ...
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Most college vs Most colleges

In this case it is plural - "most" as it suggests more than half of many colleges, so you use "colleges" plural form. The ones he gave have "majority of students" which ...
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1 vote
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Making a compound adjective using "mundane" and "oriented"

"Mundanity-oriented" makes no sense! It should be "mundane-oriented". "At a critical point" cannot be used here as the context depicts something deepening until a point. ...
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1 vote

Through/via vs. By

Via is definitely inappropriate; it means by way of in the context of making a journey. I'm not quite sure what your sentence means, but I think by feels more idiomatic than through.
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1 vote

Through/via vs. By

The first one is better. The main difference between these two prepositions is, "by" is mostly used when referring to a means of something while "through" is used in relation to a ...
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0 votes

Vogue vs. Fashion

Both are correct, but the second one is more commonly used than the first. I didn't even know that "vogue" was a word until I read this question!
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1 vote

Is "thought" or "had been thinking" more common?

You can just look at this Ngram viewer here, which shows which is more commonly used. As you can see in the link, "thought" is a lot more commonly used than "had been thinking".
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0 votes
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fell asleep vs had fallen asleep

"fell asleep" means he just fell asleep, "had fell asleep" means he was already asleep. This context says that you got home and that he was already asleep, so it is "had ...
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5 votes
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I'm not well enough or I'm not good enough

When talking about health, we use well, but we don't usually use good. I'm not good enough in any context is talking about my ability, my competence, or my virtue, not about my health.
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Difference between "need" and "would need"

A "would need" is being used as "would" acts like a auxiliary verb, where it depicts the present future tense (context is present tense). To put it simply: If goes to production ...
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0 votes

Good at / better at

It would be more appropriate to say Certainly, I am better at some sports than I am at others or the ones I play most are tennis [etc].
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2 votes

What is the difference between the prepositions 'up' and 'onto', both indicating 'motion'?

Up shows direction of motion. You can go up the hill from anywhere on it, even from the very bottom. Onto shows motion to a place that is on top of something. The motion itself does not need to be ...
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1 vote

What is the difference between up and upon?

I wonder where you found that definition. It's misleading, I think. As Lexico says, The preposition upon has the same core meaning as the preposition on. However, in modern English upon tends to be ...
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1 vote
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What is the difference between up and upon?

I don't find We went upon the hill particularly idiomatic. Upon usually describes a position rather than movement. It's far more natural to say We went up the hill but you can say We stood upon the ...
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2 votes

What is the difference between the prepositions ‘upon‘ & ‘onto‘?

"The cat jumped upon the table" introduces a potential ambiguity. It could be understood as "The cat did jumps which started and finished on the table." Now pragmatically that is ...
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1 vote
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Difference between "particularly" and "in particular"

Sentence (3) means the same as sentence (2) - that the speaker is singling out the blue shirt as a garment they especially like.
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1 vote

Difference between "particularly" and "greatly"

The intensifier greatly is almost never used before "standard" adjectives such as difficult, easy, expensive, enjoyable. It's almost entirely restricted to past participle verb forms used ...
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Difference between "particularly" and "greatly"

Particularly implies more difficult than most other objects. So it compares the degree of difficulty of indirect objects with that of other objects. Greatly means very difficult, but does not compare ...
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What'a the difference between "wouldn't" vs "didn't" in the past

They have the same meaning, but "wouldn't" is stronger than "didn't". "wouldn't" denotes a lack of permission or willingness on the part of the subject, "didn't"...
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6 votes
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Why is "omniscient" different from "know-it-alls"?

Omniscient is a technical word that is used to talk about God. God, we are told, knows everything in the past and in the future. This is not something that can be non-ironically applied to humans. A ...
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2 votes
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Employ, adopt, use, apply

Employ, use, and apply are all very similar in meaning: they all basically mean use. Adopt is the only one that is a little different in meaning: it means something like "to choose as a new ...
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A man for whom or A man in whose case

Neither sentence is good though both are grammatical. Being formal does not require writing like a poorly programmed robot. A man who graduated from college less than year ago is more concise, more ...
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2 votes
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Have/has known vs familiar with

I agree with @stangdon that "I have known about" doesn't sound natural in the present context, but not that it doesn't sound natural in any context. Here is an example: I have known about ...
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1 vote

'did not start' and 'have not started' which of the following is appropriate?

You can use either expression, however there is a very subtle difference (see below). In both cases, "that" should really be "who" because you're talking about people, not things. ...
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1 vote
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learned/learnt in the same paragraph

It's true that writers and editors are usually concerned with consistency within their writing and publications. But really, no rule of grammar has been broken here. It is only an inconsistency if you ...
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0 votes
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Login particulars or Login credentials?

I find "login credentials", "login info", and even "login details" to be fine. "Login particulars" sounds unnatural to me. You can also use just "login&...
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0 votes

Login particulars or Login credentials?

I don't think there is a difference. However: The expression I have heard the most is "login details". "Login credentials" sounds right too. "Login particulars", ...
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1 vote

What is the difference between 'somebody who doing' and 'somebody who be doing'?

The first one is grammatically wrong, only the second one is correct: She is now the one who is steering the [Hairson] company. It cannot be "somebody who doing", you have to specify "...
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0 votes

What is is difference between "As long as I am selling" and "As long as I can sell"?

The baker is happy with the present situation because: He is currently selling a lot of doughnuts. He is able to sell a lot of doughnuts. Both are valid ways of expressing the same idea.
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I will close the door / I'm going to close the door?

I like this question. I think the way it reads to me the implication here is previous knowledge of the status of the door. "Oh, I'll close it" -> I didn't know I had left the door open, ...
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2 votes

I will close the door / I'm going to close the door?

I think the first one definitely sounds more natural to me in 99% of cases. It has the implication that you were unaware that you left the door open and now that you have been told you are going to ...
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I will close the door / I'm going to close the door?

A. You left the door open. B. Oh, yes, I'll close it. I'll (will) in English is used to offer to do something in contexts like this. Bear in mind that the question form of offering to do something is ...
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1 vote

Spoken TO vs Spoken WITH

That's a good question. They can ultimately mean the same thing but can imply certain characteristics (hierarchy, closeness, etc.) about the relationship among the people in the group. I started to ...
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0 votes

"I only have a friend” vs "I only have one friend”

"I only have a friend" by itself could never be meaningful; neither in language nor in logic. Wider context might give it a meaning, and that's about the wider context. "I only have one ...
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1 vote

"in replacement of" vs "in place of"

Your teacher was right to correct you. Maybe next time trust his/her judgement? And there is a reason nothing came up on Google: "in replacement of" is not correct English, it is a non-...
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"in replacement of" vs "in place of"

Think of "in place of" as "instead of", e.g. I used jam in place of marmalade -> I used jam instead of marmalade For "in replacement of", we do not use this as it ...
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1 vote

Patient or client?

While person-centered psychologists first suggested the adoption of the term "client" to avoid the supposed negative connotation of "patient", research actually suggests that ...
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1 vote

'is been created' vs 'have been created'

Contrasting "is' to "have" is confusing as the first is singular and the second is plural, so let me start by making a slight change to your question: What is the differences between '...
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"I only have a friend” vs "I only have one friend”

They are not the same. "One" means literally one. You cannot have another if you have one. "A" means one from a group. While the friend you are talking about might be the only ...
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-1 votes

Then why didn't you come? / Why didn't you come then?

Then implies a time in the past, which is already implied by using the past tense of "to come". So it would be like saying Why didn't you come then, in the past, before now. In some cases, ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Is there any difference between "commonly" and "normally"?

As adverbs the difference between "commonly" and "normally" is that "commonly" is as a rule; frequently; usually while "normally" is under normal conditions or ...
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6 votes

'is been created' vs 'have been created'

"is been created" is grammatically wrong and cannot be used, check this out when trying to use "is been". "has been created" implies the event occurred very recently/in ...
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0 votes

Aren’t they vs don’t they

Present simple: for general statements, auxiliary verb do/does Crimes only happen in favelas. Declarative Crimes don't happen only in favelas. Negative Don't crimes only happen in favelas? Negative ...
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Aren’t they vs don’t they

The difference is the same as between: Crimes (do) happen. Crimes are happening. The difference is that the former is in the indefinite present tense which implies the crimes happen periodically, on ...
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1 vote

Difference between past simple and past perfect in conditional tenses

The first option is correct in both cases. They describe an alternative reality for something which has already happened (we are lost - you failed the exam). Using the past simple in a conditional, we ...
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5 votes

"I only have a friend” vs "I only have one friend”

They are not the same, let’s look at the “only have a” in other contexts. “Let’s fix your car, bring your tools” to which an appropriate reply might be “I only have a hammer”. Or perhaps “We are ...
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0 votes

free (up) some space

to free something or someone is to give them their liberty or freedom to move about. The dog was freed from the doghouse when he became trapped due to the wind. The slaves were freed later than then ...
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1 vote

"I only have a friend” vs "I only have one friend”

The first sentence would not be a common one. It could be a reply to a question such as "Do you have a lover?" or "Do you have a supervisor?" "No, I only have a friend." -...
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"All I want" or "I only want"

The focus of the 1st sentence is on what fulfils your want. In this case peace and quiet would do the job. Anything extra would be redundant. The focus of the 2nd sentence places a limit on what you ...
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0 votes

"I only have a friend” vs "I only have one friend”

The 1st sentence means you're not referring to any specific friend. In contrast, when you say the friend, you'd mean a specific friend. In either case, you'd need some context to make the phrase ...
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