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1

"Inheritance" is possibly the broadest word of the three. It can refer to anything that is passed to people from previous generations, including physical possessions left in a last will and testament, biological traits, and sometimes intangible things such as a responsibility, state or condition. Examples: I inherited my father's house. I inherited my ...


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With ‘each other’ the sentence could mean that every pair of things has a link; with ‘one another’ it could mean only that each thing has a link with some other thing. But where this distinction is intended I would expect it to be worded more explicitly.


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Many X means a large quantity of countable items. Some X means a quantity that is not one or all, and typically implies not many. I have been at this job for many years. For some years now John has been my coworker.


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"Standing in line" is an idiom. I don't recall ever encountering "standing up in line." It sounds very odd. I have dreamt up a context in which someone might produce it: they mean to convey that they've been on their feet for a long time. But even so, that's not a good way to express that.


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"Cost effective" means that it is good value. It has a very "business English" style. If you say the train is "cost effective" you are saying that you or your company will can increase your profits by using the train compared to other forms of transport. "Affordable" means that something is quite cheap. Literally it means that many people would be able to ...


0

Beware of Grammarly and other sites providing software that purports to give advice on how to write English. Grammarly provides no credentials for its staff and purports to be AI driven, a technique that fails to capture the complexity of English idiom. The Corpora of Contemporary American English finds 46 prepositions that can follow the word insight. Note ...


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The noun insight does not take the preposition of. Grammarly is right.


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The verbs are open and close. I open a door, then I close the door. Doors open and close. The past participles are opened and closed. The adjectives are open and closed. The door is open or is closed. (Note that "close" can also be an adjective, but with a different meaning, namely the opposite of far. "The door is close" means the door is nearby, not far ...


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Whoever of the two of you makes more hits in the last round, wins the whole game. or Whoever of the two of you makes the most hits in the last round, wins the whole game.


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You can do it. But, the meaning of the sentence, which paraphrase looks like that 'How do you imagine my benefit from switching ? ' will change to the meaning of 'What is your sure knowledge about my benefit from switching?'


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As Orbital Aussie noted, the speaker is using 'baby speak' to make it easier. The correct term is: triangular hole Similarly, you have quoted a difference between British and North American English, whereas my experience of both places is that use of the term 'right-angled triangle' would be used when speaking formally and / or to adults, whereas you ...


0

The word "gear" has lots of senses that are not related to cogs. You can't replace the word "gear" by "cog" in these examples: I put the car in gear and moved off. I've got my camping gear, like my tend and sleeping bag. There are some idioms using "cog" to mean "cogwheel" or "gear wheel" in which you can't replace "cog" by "gear": He is just a ...


1

This is a case of the so called Mixed conditional in speech. The first sentence means that Person 1 didn't understand the question that was asked in the quiz. Person 2 replies to Person 1, while using the so called Mixed conditional of the type: if + 2nd conditional / 3rd conditional. A grammatically complete sentence, which is implied, is that: 'If I got ...


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Wouldn't have is hypothetical. Won't have is real. "I can't believe I got the final question in the pop quiz wrong." "I wouldn't have known the answer either." The first person took the quiz, and they can't believe they got the final question wrong. The second person would have gotten the question wrong too if they had taken the quiz (instead of the ...


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Up first, when searching for definitions on Cambridge Dictionary, we find: to relax (verb): to (cause someone to) become less active and more calm and happy, or to (cause a part of the body to) become less stiff. to rest (verb): to (cause someone or something to) stop doing a particular activity or stop being active for a period of time in order to ...


2

The verbs rest and relax are so near-synonyms that it takes one of them to explain the other: To rest means to relax, sleep or do nothing after a period of activity or illness; to not use a part of your body for some time The doctor told me to rest. Rest your eyes every half an hour. I awoke feeling rested and refreshed. To relax means to rest by ...


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Relax is more of a "slow down and take it easy" mode while rest is usually used to mean to literally stop whatever you are doing at the moment. So in your example sentence, I would likely assume if you use relax, that you did something as a hobby, for example, watching TV or reading a book. Using rest there, I would assume you took a nap or just sat there ...


1

Technically, I think the cog is actually one of the teeth on a gear. Gear : a wheel having pointed parts around the edge that come together with similar parts of other wheels to control how much power from an engine goes to the moving parts of a machine Cog : one of the tooth-like parts around the edge of a wheel in a machine that fits between those ...


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45 million (is the number given), millions more=other millions, not specified as to how many millions exactly. In a text that says millions more (or more millions) some number of millions has already been specified. There is no way to tell exactly how many "millions more" this is exactly. millions more or more millions always means the same thing ...


0

The differences in meaning are subtle but real. "Look back on" suggests rumination or reflection, and often has a hint of summing things up or even of nostalgia. As I look back on our organization's 125-year history... "Look back to" is often used in contexts involving trying to figure out how to handle some situation where the notion is to find ideas, ...


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As is already pointed out in the comments from @Michael: The best answer you are going to get will be based on the dictionary meanings of 'molest', e.g. (Cambridge Dictionary) "to touch or attack someone in a sexual way against their wishes", and "to touch, push, etc. someone violently" From this, we can infer that rape is a type of molestation, but not ...


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To 'Look back' is to remember, but it also carries a sense of remembering for a purpose - to examine the past. I don't think that the 'at/on/to' part is as important to understand than what it means to look back. They would simply be used to complete your thought and as a matter of style. For example: When I look back to the way I behaved that ...


-1

Look back at the picture before you answer the question. To see the answer, look back on the screen. For me, I think it's good to look back to the past.


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John was in a car accident yesterday, and he is now in jail. I may or may not know John. This is a simple statement. John was in a car accident yesterday, and he is now sitting in jail. This somewhat implies the person saying this has the power to bail him out of jail, but is choosing not to do so to teach John a lesson.


2

There's not much difference. The first has a simple literal meaning. The second says that he is "sitting" so we suppose that he is not doing much. He isn't standing at the bars protesting his innocence or being interviewed by the police. He isn't meeting his lawyer to plan his defence. He is just sitting there. It isn't a particularly common phrase. There ...


2

Speaking as an American, I have never before heard the term "skate shoe". I've always heard "roller skates", or "skates" for short. Note that "skates" can also be short for "ice skates". The phrase is almost always used in the plural, like "I put on my roller skates" or "I put on a pair of roller skates". I suppose if you lost one of the pair, you might ...


1

This is a roller skate. The wheels pivot together when the skate is leaned, like a skateboard does. Lean right: the front wheel assembly twists clockwise when viewed from above, the rear counter clockwise, like 4 wheel steering on a car. And then there's the strap on roller skates we had as kids in the 1960s, no practical way to stop except for taking a ...


3

In the US, we (at least those of us of certain age) would call the item in your picture "roller blades" or "inline skates". Traditional roller skates have the wheels positioned like a car (two wheels side-by-side in the front and back).


3

There are two perspectives that you have to understand in order to answer this question for yourself. One perspective is from someone "of faith", a believer in God or any higher power. The other perspective is from an Athiest and more scientific point of view. Opinion A: "Faith is different from superstition." This article, written by a Christian has this ...


0

They're totally different words. Faith is belief/trust/confidence in something. There's nothing to do with supernatural things. Superstition is anything related to the supernatural. It can be belief or reverence for the supernatural, or it can mean the practice of talking to, praying, etc. to the supernatural.


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You could "muddle up" the cards in an old fashioned card index because the cards in the index have to be in the right order for the index to be useful. In the case of playing cards they are supposed to be in a random order for the game to be played. You do this by "shuffling" them. "Muddling up" something is never a good thing so the difference is in the ...


1

They appear to be Saxon- and Latin-rooted words which are essentially synonymous, with only slight variations in usage: OED says grave is from Old English from Saxon from German from Norse, ultimately from grafan (to dig) with meanings including: a. A place of burial; an excavation in the earth for the reception of a corpse; †formerly often applied ...


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Just "shuffle" (not "shuffle up") is the idiomatic way to say you have mixed a deck of playing cards in preparation for a game or card trick: I have shuffled the cards. "Muddled up" can mean a different kind of "mixed up" - it can mean confused.


0

Thanks, Kate. You are correct. Migration is any movement. To use immigration or emigration you need a specified source of destination. All immigrants are also emigrants, and vice versa. Thus, when speaking generally about movements of people without a specified country you would use “migration”. The question being asked, specifically, was whether the ...


2

Your definition of rainy means 'a period when there are frequent showers' (a lot doesn't refer to heavy rain). So if rain is falling now we say "It is raining". There is normally 'some light from the sun' in the daytime. A sunny day is when the sun is strong and there are few clouds in the sky. "It has sunlight" is not idiomatic English. We can say "The sun ...


2

They do mean the same thing, however, the first is much more idiomatic. What they mean is that, of all of the female presidents elected in 2019, she was the first. One other thing I'll mention is that these have a completely different meaning to something like: She was the first female president [of some country], and was elected in 2019. Elected ...


0

Just adding to the list of answers. I usually hear 'hail a cab', or 'hail a taxi'.


1

They are two different questions. What is your life like in two words? Here you are being asked to describe your life, its qualities, your subjective experience of it, etc. Given that you're being asked to do it in two words, the questioner is likely expecting some kind of snappy, creative, answer, almost like a headline. What is your life in two ...


1

Neither is ideal. Both "warming" and "heating" are used as verbs that operate on an object, for example: John is heating his soup. John is the subject, soup is the object, and it is the soup which is actually getting heated. When you omit an object, it may still be assumed that there is one, for example: Soup is warming. This can mean that soup has ...


0

It would seem to me to be because it doesn't necessarily relate directly to the present. For instance, you could say: I had no idea you were such a good chess player until you won the tournament. But it would make no sense to say: I have had no idea you were such a good chess player until you won the tournament. We also know it doesn't relate ...


0

Firstly, you use modal 'can' when the ability is clear ( be able) without any probability or possibility. Secondly, you use modal 'could' when the possibility or ability of one is not so clear. Lastly, you use could have + past participle when one is regretting an event in the past. e.g. I could have answered the question. ( = But I did not ); Should you ...


4

Chase down is a phrasal verb meaning: to follow and catch (someone or something): Police chased down the robber in an alley. to search for and find (someone or something): I finally chased down that recipe I promised you. I chased him down at his old hangout. Whereas, Chase is a word which could be used in different ways. As a verb: ...


1

"Calling a taxi" would sound more like you are talking directly to the taxi, or hailing one in the street. "Calling for a taxi" could mean that you are calling a phone number to speak to someone about arranging a taxi, so it's what you'd want to use here. You would use "from", as if you just say "here", there is a certain ambiguity, where "here" could ...


1

THERE IS NO GENERAL RULE. It is a property of the particular words that govern the clause. Important takes a to-infinitive clause (or a that clause). Do more than takes a bare infinitive clause. There is no principle or logic behind this: it is (or should be) part of the dictionary entry for the word, and just has to be learnt.


2

Logical nonsense perhaps. Most language is illogical. "Caretaker" is a fairly old word, it means someone who "takes care" of a house or particularly a school. It could, I suppose, be generalised in a story to someone who takes care of a whole planet. You should understand "care" here means "charge, oversight, attention or heed with a view to safety or ...


1

In Australian English, our terms are basically the same as in British English, but most American terms would be recognised and used by many as well. (I've never heard "prompt/urgent care" used here, though. You have "after-hours GPs", or just go to the hospital.) So you can call it a "doctor's surgery", "surgery", or just "the doctor" (or "GP").


0

Related can mean a positive connection, or a negative connection, but associated would usually mean only a positive connection.


2

As a Canadian, we use "put" in most instances where an American would use "set". The exception would be a stock phrase, such as "set the table." I have noticed since moving to the States that everyone here uses the word "set" where a Canadian would use "put". For Instance: "Where is my hair brush?" Oh! I set it on your dresser!" Or "where should I set ...


2

In AmE (at least in New England, but this could be regional) a clinic typically refers to an outpatient treatment or diagnostic center. Hospitals may contain clinics, but clinics are not hospitals. Doctors may also have private offices that are not associated with hospitals or clinics. Someone seeking treatment, diagnosis, therapy, or advice might say they ...


11

In American English, it's common to refer to such a place as "the doctor's office" or even just "the doctor". Such places may be officially called something like "Offices of Dr. Jones, MD". The word "clinic" should also be pretty widely understood as different from a hospital. It might have a connotation of being a place that focuses more on one specific ...


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