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A term that comes to mind is nice guy. In most contexts, it simply means a guy who is literally nice. It is something both males and females would most often use to praise someone — It's great to be working with him; he's such a nice guy. "Nice" can have negative connotations, however, indicating someone who is not assertive or ruthless enough, and who ...


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These sentences have identical meanings. One could perhaps argue that the first phrasing puts more emphasis on the people than the place (since you lead with "I am with them"), and vice versa for the latter (since you lead with "I am in Paris"), but either one expresses the same overall idea. Any shades of implied emphasis here are very, very minor.


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The difference is subtle, and often trivial. Consider these two definitions from the Lexico/Oxford dictionary: progress (n): Forward or onward movement towards a destination. progression (n): The process of developing or moving gradually towards a more advanced state. If we think of "progress" as simply moving forward, and a "progression" as moving ...


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Wiktionary gives the translation "orbiter", "A person who constantly hangs around with someone they are attracted to, but too shy to talk to." Alternatively, if I have misunderstood, a "Sugar daddy" is typically an older man who buys gifts for a younger woman. "A man who spends money for the benefit of a relationship with an often younger romantic or sexual ...


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These two pairs of words are indeed quite similar, and can sometimes be used interchangeably, but the connotations differ enough that usually these terms are distinguishable. Generally speaking, to accept something is a positive action, implying that you are at terms with whatever you are accepting and are, more or less, embracing it -- on the other hand, to ...


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Refer can be a direct reference; it has multiple meanings The verb refer has several meanings (or different shades of meaning). One of these is: refer to [somebody/something] -- phrasal verb B2 to talk or write about someone or something, especially in only a few words: In her autobiography she occasionally refers to her unhappy ...


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In a rowing motion, the handles of the oars get both pulled toward you and pushed away from you. However, we usually focus on the motion when the blades of the oar are dipped in the water. You can row either way, but normally the blades are dipped when you pull, so that the boat moves in the direction opposite the way the rower is facing. However, rowers ...


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In this context, "rubbish" is strictly British. Along with "lorry", "flat", and "petrol", it's one of the common words that show up on lists of differences between the two countries, and how to immediately tell someone is likely to be from the UK (aside from the accent, of course). Americans do say "rubbish", but not normally as a metaphor for something of ...


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Signing the contract was a great victory / triumph for me. Both are figurative in meaning, and the choice depends on how much you want to emphasize your emerging as victor. I'd prefer the former over the latter because in this particular instance, a triumph is already great enough, so a victory is what I think would be the usual choice. In an example (...


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For all of these examples except the fourth, I would choose victory. The reasons why are a little different for each, so I'll do my best to explain them individually. The differences between these words are few and relatively minor, but one to take note of is that a triumph is very explicitly made against something or someone in particular, whereas a victory ...


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Regarding "the dishes": A dish, in my area of the USA is more often called "a plate". It is a flat, usually round thing made from plastic, glass, or ceramic that you put non-liquid food on and eat from. However, the dishes can either mean a collection of plates, (especially as compared to bowls, as in "put the dishes here and the bowls there"), but most ...


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Both are perfectly normal grammar, but mean very slightly different things. "He kept going until he saw the river." suggests that 'he' stopped (whatever is being talked about, probably walking/driving/etc) as soon as the river was in sight. So key thing is that this is present tense. "He kept going until he had seen the river." suggests that 'he' only ...


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To get through (something) means to succeed or finish SUCCEED FINISH I've got a stack of paperwork to get through before I can go out. -- Cambridge Dictionary The Cambridge dictionary does not describe this phrasal verb as informal, and says it is accepted in British English, American English and "business English". You may have ...


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(a) The film was a real rubbish. NO (a) This car is a rubbish. NO (b) This car is a lemon YES The word rubbish is an uncountable noun, you cannot count "rubbish" individually. The correct way to state the OP's sample sentences would be This car is rubbish That film was rubbish That film was really rubbish Man, this job is rubbish. ...


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In my experience, silverware is the most common term for metal eating utensils (forks, knives, spoons), though flatware is also perfectly acceptable. I've also heard and used cutlery to describe this set of items, though in the U.S., cutlery can also refer to kitchen knives of all kinds. Crockery is very common to refer to ceramic dish sets, also just ...


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In the given context It was Tuesday is more suitable. As you are beginning the story and nothing has been introduced it is correct, the second would be more appropriate where something has been introduced. For example: I really liked that party we went to! It was on Thursday.


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What is the difference between "in time" and "over time"? Like you mentioned, "in time" and "over time" seem to be synonyms. Of course "in time" has another meaning also, of "meeting a deadline." Is there a particular reason the writer of The American Pageant prefers "in time" here? Very interesting. I have not thought about this topic before, but "over ...


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"Opposite" cannot go in either slot. Opposite is very specific; it must be a mirror image of X in reverse on the other end of the spectrum. "Contrary" describes something that is just NOT X but can be anywhere along the spectrum. It is far less precise.


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[1] I want to speak to you. [2] I am looking forward to seeing you. [3] I am interested to learn English. No, the to-infinitival is not a myth, nor is "to" always a preposition. However, I can see where Mitchell is coming from. You see, the subordinator "to" that marks infinitival clauses derives historically from the preposition "to" (notice the ...


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To is not always a preposition. See Merriam-Webster here. Examples: The children ran to and fro. (adverb) He finally came to. (adverb) His bride-to-be is very charming indeed. (adjective) The problem underlying your concerns is that grammarians do not always agree on whether to is a particle or a preposition in to + infinitive. I follow ...


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All a matter of preference. I would say mostly dedication first of all, seems like you are quite dedicated if you have gotten this far. I would suggest watching as many things possible in English so that you can understand and remember the proper sentence structures. I have been learning Spanish and what has helped me is to use it constantly and be ...


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The -ing form, as you say, can be made from more or less any verb. It refers to the act or activity of the verb. So Your explaining was very good says that the act of your explaining was very good: perhaps you spoke well, perhaps the hearer was very much in need of an explanation. It does not directly say anything about the content of your explaining. ...


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The verb (in this case TO) is required when referencing a person. "I need to talk to Alice about the car." When a the sentence concerns other nouns that aren't people as the topic of the conversation the verb TO can be left out. The second example you mentioned uses talking to imply a claim. For example you could rephrase the sentence as follows "We are ...


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In a simple way Mention is used to describe something in detail Nd point out is also used to describe something but in a brief nd straight forward manner....


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I'd like to point out that you are correct on many counts: The two words have similar, overlapping meanings. You could use pointed out in some of those sentences, and they would still be grammatical and sound natural. Here is one that I think is troublesome, though: My wife pointed out seeing you the other day on the street. I don't think that one ...


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Basically I understand for “doorman” and “porter”, the man who is in the front of the hotel and who can helps with the luggage. Although Nothing James has said is incorrect I think there is a need to expand his answer. By definition A Porter can be a Doorman but a Doorman is not a Porter. Therefore you thoughts that they are the same is not far from the ...


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It could be two jobs. The doorman stands at the door and welcomes guests. Typically he would stay at the door all day. Typically this would be an older gentleman. The porter works inside the hotel, carrying bags. Typically this would be a young man. Most hotels don't have traditional "doormen" anymore, but may have "security" at the door. You might see ...


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GOOD QUESTION. There is no exact answer. As the scope of work of actual companies using these titles has made the boundaries unclear. Which is correct, Facilities Management Agency, Facilities Management Company or Facility Management Company? Facilities Management Company or Facility Management Company In terms of actual work there is relatively no ...


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I heard him sing. This implies that his singing is finished. "Sing" is a bare infinitive. I heard him singing. This denotes that his singing is ongoing, and has not come to an end. "Singing" is functioning as an adjective, qualifying the pronoun "him".


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I was talking about something else when she started suddenly talking about what he was up-to these days. In your sentences, suddenly, as in “suddenly started,” is a misplaced modifier.


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Let me preface my breakdown by saying this: connotations are everything. This is difficult as an ELL, since you're less likely to have heard enough context surrounding these words to get a proper feel for them. My answer will largely focus on these connotations, which are inherently highly subjective, so I welcome other answers to support mine. 1) Let's ...


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Yes "role model" and "reference point" are similar, but as your dictionary definitions show they are different. Calling someone a role model is to state they are someone who should be emulated (copy their behaviour) and that people should aspire (hope) to be like. A reference point is an absolute. You can see from the dictionary definition it is the ...


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difference between “role model” and “reference point”? The difference is a role model is someone to look up to and possibly to follow their example. A reference point is literally a point of reference. This is an engineering term (especially Civil Engineering) where some location is given as a reference. For example a level of X meters above sea level. It ...


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Since this is an imperative sentence, the implied subject is you. So, the object pronoun must be a reflexive pronoun. A reflexive pronoun is used when the object of the verb is the same as the subject. Since the person is sending a picture of themselves, you would have to use the reflexive pronoun yourself. Of yours implies possession, so if you were to ...


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Simply: something can be generally useful, such as a bicycle or oscilloscope. However, the bicycle would be helpful in getting to class, but not the oscilloscope. The 'scope would be more helpful to view a waveform, though. Also, as applied to people, helpful implies a willingness to assist, and usefulness implies having the ability to do something. Five-...


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Q1. Useful vs Helpful; the difference in meaning between 'useful' and 'helpful' when we talk about non-physical things. Q2&3. When can you say that some advice/knowledge OR explanation is useful? And when is it helpful? Q4. How do you describe something useful but not helpful? Because I know that sometimes something can be useful but not ...


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The literal difference between these sentences is simply one of time limiting. "What was the most painful experience you have ever experienced as a mother" would be "from the time you became a mother until now, what was your most painful experience?" — if you choose to interpret the questions completely literally. However, when people ask these ...


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"Me either" should be slapped out of someone's mouth, if using the same way as "me neither". It may be more common in some places than in others, but that doesn't make it correct, OR acceptable! The comma example would be an acceptable exception; even though it would still sound weird. I.E. "Would you like a Coke or a Pepsi?" "Me, either." ...


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The first sentence is spoken by someone who is a mother. It could be rephrased "I am a mother and I warn you", They are speaking from the point of view of a mother. The second sentence is saying "If I were a mother I would warn you" the speaker is not necessarily a mother or even female. They are saying what they think a mother would say.


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Neither quite works. "Backroom" is nothing to do with TV. It refers to actions done in secret, often illegally The banks are alleged to have made a backroom deal to manipulate exchange rates. "Backstage" is possible, but tends to mean where the presenters or actors prepare. Jack waited backstage, practising his lines in his head. In a TV studio, ...


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"Duty free" is specific to imports, duty is a fee that you pay when you import goods. "Duty free" is not the right term. "Tax exempt" is a property of the product that means that sales tax is not raised on it. For example, in the UK, Foodstuffs are exempt from VAT. Accountants might say that actually food is "zero-rated", but it comes to the same thing. ...


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Not a native speaker but one who has spoken English since early childhood, I’ve read and used this word many times in the second sense given in American Heritage Dictionary. To me the difference between the verbs “spy” and “espy” was always clear.


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Will you please lend me your pen? Would you pleae lend me your pen? Could you please lend me your pen? All of them are polite requests. In general: could you please is more polite than would you please would you please is more polite than will you please will you please is polite but less polite than the other two It depends on who you are asking: ...


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'Could you' is, strictly speaking, asking whether the person is capable or able to do something. 'Will you' has an implication that the person is capable of doing something, and is more of a request that they do, actually, do it (for you). Alan.


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The sense hre is close to 1b or 3, but it is a figurative use, while those seem to be literal senses. The movement of money or of interest rates around the world is being compared to the movement of ripples over the surface of a lake or other small body of water. "ripple" is chose rather than "wave" to suggest that individual changes are amall, but that they ...


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In the context of social media, the distinctions outlined in some of the replies here don't really apply / aren't observed, with terms direct message and private message being used interchangeably, though perhaps platform-dependently: e.g., Reddit has private messages while Twitter has direct messages – they are both private in nature (although multiple ...


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lore – the history of the world story – the actual events which occur in the narrative For more information check this , it will help https://wikidiff.com/lore/story https://forums.warframe.com/topic/391511-difference-between-lore-plot-and-story/


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Particularly in role playing games or any game that takes place in a made up universe, the lore typically refers more to the backstory/history of either your character or the game world, while the story refers more to the current events of the game and the various exploits your character undergoes. For example, in the Halo franchise, the different missions ...


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"Private" (adj) means something meant to be accessed by certain individuals who are given permission by the sender. A "private message" should only be read or received by the recipient. No one else should be able or allowed to read it unless given permission by the sender or recipient of the message. "Direct" (adj) means being sent from A to B without extra ...


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Ignite to my understanding means something gets on in an instant. Kindle to me means something gets on in a slow process.


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