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The word "honeykins" uses two suffixes to make it more endearing: "-kin" and "-s". -kin is an English suffix that was used in the olden days to form diminutive forms of nouns. There are still several dozen words in the language that were formed using this suffix. The more known are pumpkin, catkin, napkin, the less known are ladykin, pannikin. It has a ...


5

Hackney is a placename, once a parish northwest of London in the County of Middlesex; the name derives from OE Hacan ieg, Haca's isle, designating the meadows rising out of the marshes along the Thames. The superior grazing afforded by these meadows made the area famous for its horses, which became known as hackneys. The term designated a light horse: not ...


4

It is an alternative way of saying honey or darling. The addition of kins makes honey sound even more loving. For instance, cutie and cutie pie function the same way. In the Urdu language, we add the suffix "jaan" to convey a more lovable tone to a precious person.


3

No, this ending is not dimiutive. A partial list of words (including names) can be obtained on an Ubuntu Linux system easily: $ grep 'ney$' /usr/share/dict/words Barney Britney Brittney Cagney Carney Chaney Cheney Cockney Courtney Delaney Disney Haney Hockney Kinney McCartney McKinney Mooney Mulroney Orkney Penney Rodney Romney Rooney Sidney Sweeney Sydney ...


3

This just doesn't work in English: the use of such suffixes is very restricted. For instance, your example starlet can't mean small star: it only means minor celebrity. I can't think of any such suffix that could be used after chair. Certainly no such word is in the official Scrabble dictionary. But I am curious -- what are all these derivatives of стул in ...


2

The closest thing I can think of is the diminutive suffix -ie or -y. You may know from affectionate nicknames such as Billy, Mikey, Barbie, Paulie, etc., but it is sometimes used with common nouns as well: deafie, Aussie, boatie (remember Boaty McBoatface? Schoolie McSchoolface?). Note that this suffix isn't necessarily endearing, and is often used to ...


1

It's one of the variations used for endearment - I believe there's no significant difference. (Preferences regarding words of endearment/pet name vary from person to person/couple to couple)


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