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20 votes
Accepted

What's the main difference of either and neither?

Your definition of "either" is incorrect. It means more like "one or the other". "Neither" is "not" + "either", so it means something like "not ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
3 votes
Accepted

Not expect any result OR results?

Both are correct depending on the context. If you expect there to be 0 or 1 results, then you can use the first one. He tried to cast a spell, but he didn't expect any result. If you expect there ...
NibblyPig's user avatar
  • 1,218
2 votes
Accepted

How do I treat the second part of "have either no" construction?

The example in the question: If this paper has either no hardware topic or a programming language chapter then it's good for me. seems to me to be ambiguous. It could mean (1) that an acceptable ...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.2k
2 votes

What's the main difference of either and neither?

I want neither (one). = I don't want either (one). They mean: I want neither food A nor food B. I do not want either food A or food B. Mnemonic trick: Think of verbs: I don't eat pastry. I eat no ...
Lambie's user avatar
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2 votes

What could this statement mean? " I don't want either. "

Normally one would say this if offered a choice of two things, and you don't want the first thing and you also don't want the second thing. Like, "Do you want a hamburger or a hot dog?" &...
Jay's user avatar
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1 vote

What could this statement mean? " I don't want either. "

Contrast it to the statement, "You can have either (one)." This means that the giver doesn't care which one you want, so you can take your pick. To say, "I don't want either." the ...
WhatRoughBeast's user avatar
1 vote

either of us -- does it mean "any of us"? Also, can *either* allow for the scenario where we have "everyone of us", so more than one person?

As any dictionary will tell you, 'either' is used when referring to a choice between two possibilities. Your quotation using "either of us" must come from a couple. Any choice involving more ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
1 vote

'Both' in a negative sentence

You stated the rule, so follow it. We don’t use both with a negative verb; we use either instead. In your example, haven't is a contraction for have not and it's a negative verb. So (B) is correct ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 6,960
1 vote

Word usage: "either" or both?

None of these sound natural or clear. I agree with FumbleFingers that 1 and 2 are technically valid, but poor style. To say what is apparently intended one might write: Neither Sally nor Peter has ...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.2k
1 vote

"Either": unexceptionable even when it applies to more than two clauses

It is hard to answer your question because you are comparing definitions of “whether” and “or” and a usage note on “either.” The usage note that you are referring to reports a recommendation that, ...
Jeff Morrow's user avatar
  • 32.1k
1 vote

Should the adverb 'either' go before or after the verb in this sentence?

When you use "either", the two options that follow should be able to form complete sentences with whatever appears before the word. In your example, you have two different verbs - "pay" and "use". For ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
1 vote

Neither did Neither she nor he

We can follow 'neither' with two items, which are joined by 'nor'. I like neither hot dogs nor mustard; We talked with neither Mary nor Jim; Neither Peter nor Sarah likes hot dogs. “Nor” with “...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Can we say positive verbs + neither?

Yes, you can say it, but I don't think it's very common in that context, perhaps because if you're refusing something you do usually want to use a negative verb. In general, I find neither in ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
1 vote

Do/does - what to use with either?

You would not say either but would ask Does any of you have water? or Do any of you have water? The word either is used with two.
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
1 vote

Not expect any result OR results?

Oftentimes, when people are talking about results, they are talking about situations, which can be organized in many ways. "We tried talking to her about her punctuality issues, but didn't get any ...
user208817's user avatar

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