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9 votes
Accepted

Postscripts – before or after the signature?

A postscript originated from postscriptum(Latin) meaning post(after) +scriptum*, the past participle of scribere(to write). It is an additional remark at the end of the letter after the signature ...
V.V.'s user avatar
  • 7,115
5 votes

For your information or for your kind information?

"For your kind information" seams to appear only in Indian English. The adjective "kind" here describes "information". Here's to ask then "Can information be kind?" or "What is kind information?" - ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
5 votes

Postscripts – before or after the signature?

A postscript is a passage at the end of a letter, following the signature. It only makes sense in the context of a letter composed by hand or on a typewriter, to accommodate an afterthought when you ...
Chuma Umenze's user avatar
5 votes

What is the antonym (opposite) of “email”?

The Wikipedia entry for Mail has a few possible terms you could consider. As an AmE speaker, I use the term postal mail to clarify that I'm speaking about physical letters and not electronic messages....
Todd's user avatar
  • 670
4 votes
Accepted

What does this mean: ^^

It's an emoticon. Based on the context, it shows your professor's positive reaction to your email. Usually, the variants are: ^^, or (^^,) ^__^ or (^_^) ^-^ . . . ^.^ . . .
shin's user avatar
  • 5,448
4 votes

"Please Find Attached or "Please Find Enclosed" in a formal email?

Please find attached "Monthly status report" PDF for your reference would be appropriate; you cannot enclose anything in an email because they don't have envelopes. However (in my opinion) a more ...
EnronEvolved's user avatar
4 votes

Introducing myself on text message

You should use This is when you are being asked to introduce yourself. for example when you join a conference call and someone asks Who's this? or Who's the new caller? Then you should say Hello, ...
ab29007's user avatar
  • 326
4 votes
Accepted

"I look forward to receiving your updates", is it right?

Without further context, I would say this formal response is appropriate in a business setting. If the person is expecting only one issue to be updated then the singular form could be used. Normally,...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.7k
4 votes

What is the antonym (opposite) of “email”?

What about snail mail? According to the Cambridge Dictionary snail mail [informal humorous] letters or messages that are not sent by email, but in the post As pointed by Tᴚoɯɐuo, notice that ...
RubioRic's user avatar
  • 6,863
4 votes

Say "See you tomorrow" in email for an phone interview

To say "See you" you are implying you will be seeing them, in this case it would make more sense to sign off with something like "Speak to you this Friday".
moonCat93's user avatar
  • 166
4 votes

Dear Concern or Concerned

It is uncommon for anybody in my country to begin emails with "Dear anything", but "Dear concern" or "Dear concerned" would be extremely odd. I agree that "Dear ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
4 votes

"If you do not mind" or "If you agree": what is the best choice?

"If you do not mind" is somewhat negative, as if you think you are making an imposition or perhaps even an unreasonable request. "If you agree" is more positive and suggests you ...
Lesley's user avatar
  • 141
3 votes
Accepted

Which of the following sentences is more formal for the end of the e-mails?

Sincerely, Regards, Yours truly, and Yours sincerely - These are the simplest and most useful letter closings to use in a formal business setting. Best regards, Cordially, and Yours respectfully -...
Aric's user avatar
  • 1,312
3 votes

How to ask about folder size

How much? asks for a quantity, and suggests you're asking the price of the folder. Ordinarily we say What size is the folder? if we are asking for a 'stock' size (e.g., 'letter' or 'legal'), or ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
3 votes

When I write emails, how do I say my name?

Emails are not like phone calls; they are more like letters. With email, the recipient can see your email address or, in some cases, your name before reading the email. (For a letter, you would add a ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 15.6k
3 votes

"Respected Sir" - is it correct to use in emails?

Salutations are culturally freighted, and the most appropriate salutation to use depends on the locale, the social distance between the correspondent and the recipient, and the medium. A style manual ...
choster's user avatar
  • 17.7k
3 votes
Accepted

How to start a letter to 2 persons?

Note that, in all cases here, it is assumed that you want to address both equally. Keeping that in mind, I would say that your first sentence is the better choice, unless: The persons share a surname:...
LMS's user avatar
  • 5,562
3 votes

"Via a phone call" or "with a phone call"?

"Via" makes sense, but it does not necessarily sound correct. Here are some alternatives: Please keep in mind that scheduling is best done by phone. For best scheduling, please call by phone. ...
Sam's user avatar
  • 9,640
3 votes
Accepted

How to address a person, whose gender is unknown, in the email body?

If you had a response, then you know the name. You can then reply to the name that was given to you. Dear Weather Vane, Thank you for your reply . . . Sometimes I am less formal and only ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 16.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Reply to Merry Christmas wishes

This is a greeting message, which also contains some information. Your response is just fine. Thank you for the information. Merry Christmas to you too. Or you can also use: Thank you for ...
CinCout's user avatar
  • 1,936
3 votes
Accepted

Uses of PLEASE with COULD in formal email/conversation

Yes, it is appropriate. "Please" is used as a function word to express politeness or emphasis in a request. You could just ask "could you provide your views on this PPT" but it ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
3 votes
Accepted

Is it okay to use "Thank you" in both body and closing of an email?

It's not seriously wrong, but it seems a bit unnecessary. You don't need a sign off in such a short email, so if it worries you just delete the second "thank you", or replace it by "...
James K's user avatar
  • 225k
3 votes

Writing an out of office message: correct use of numerical dates, specifying a return date

Let me just mention a few details that haven't been yet: Using "through" implies that the dates mentioned are included in the range. "I will be out through Friday" means you are ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 13.7k
3 votes

Reply to recepient who changed the tone fo the email

This feels more of an etiquette question than an English language question, but perhaps some of it is due to linguistic differences as you mention. Certainly, in Romance languages, there are ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
3 votes
Accepted

Should 'PFA' be followed by 'is'?

If you are indeed using "PFA" to mean "please find attachment," (and not "attached"), we can answer this by substituting it into the sentences you provide: Please find ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 3,964
2 votes
Accepted

" I have to go home so I need to leave early" is it correct?

If this is all you say, it might be considered rude. It can sound like you expect or are entitled to leave early. Also, it seems vague. I would recommend that you include the reason that you need to ...
Em.'s user avatar
  • 45.4k
2 votes

" I have to go home so I need to leave early" is it correct?

I have to go home so I need to leave early Grammatically it's fine although I'd add a comma after home. However, on it's own it may not be enough. In most work environments you would be expected (...
PerryW's user avatar
  • 2,619
2 votes

Which words to use when adding another people to the "To" list of the email conversation

My preference is simply: +Angela, Peter Sally, thanks for sending over the TPS reports... Some email clients (e.g. Google Inbox) will actually recognize this format and add the relevant ...
bscan's user avatar
  • 121

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