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21 votes

What if a quote contains an error

Quotes (that is, quoted text) must be taken as they are found. They should not be corrected, and usually errors should not be pointed out, unless they are significant to the reason why the quote is ...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.2k
14 votes

What if a quote contains an error

In addition to David's answer, there is also the matter of different style guides and what changes to a quote they say is permissible. I remember trying to quote an important statement, but the ...
AIQ's user avatar
  • 10k
11 votes

We got a PM who’s [sic] 93 years old

The [sic] is just wrong. Ultimately, whoever wrote this seems to just not know what he's talking about. "We got" is incorrect, so [sic] after both instances of that would make sense. Others have ...
joiedevivre's user avatar
  • 4,660
11 votes
Accepted

"Remaining to wear" : odd choice of expression by the Daily Mail Online

Is this an error? Is it slang? Does it sound OK to native speakers? Let's remove the extraneous material from the sentence: The presenter baffled viewers by remaining to wear her wedding ring. ...
Lawrence's user avatar
  • 6,001
11 votes

Using ing verbs

There is no limit in grammar. Three participles is not a problem at all. Having very many such phrases would be annoying and poor style. This is essentially a list, and there is no limit on how many ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
10 votes
Accepted

Unnecessary use of "your" in a sentence

"Your" is a possessive adjective. The first instance of "your" in the sentence shows ownership of the elements of the car: oil, water, and tyres. The second instance of "your" shows ownership of the ...
BuffyOverflow's user avatar
10 votes

Sentence improvement question

There's no need for yet there—its sense is already expressed with although.
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
5 votes

We got a PM who’s [sic] 93 years old

The relevant part of the South China Morning Post story looks like this: @elmoehussaini posted: “We got a PM who’s [sic] 93 years old. We got a Team of Eminent Persons to repair the economy who ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
5 votes

Find error in following sentence:

I think "an urgent work" is the error. "Urgent work" is not a countable type of work, but "an" implies a single, countable item. Therefore, the word "an" should be omitted.
Ringo's user avatar
  • 7,728
4 votes

Does the word “each” have the present or past meaning?

Only verbs have tense so your question about past and present meanings of each makes no sense because it is not a verb. The answer wanted is to replace which by who because who refers to people ...
Jeff Morrow's user avatar
  • 32.1k
4 votes

"The first and last is" or "The first and last are"

This is the same as saying: The first (chapter) and the last chapter are tough. (chapter) is implied. Since you are referring to each as named items (because of the definite article the), each is ...
user3169's user avatar
  • 31.2k
4 votes

renamed in 1946 as 7-Eleven

Yes, the preposition "as" can be used with the verb "rename". Including "as" is optional. (This is also true with some other verbs, such as "consider".) For ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
3 votes

"Sometime" or "Sometimes"

1. Yes, it should be sometimes instead of sometime, as you are referring to multiple times. 2. There can be a comma there, depending on how you wish your sentence to sound. Also a should be changed ...
Abel's user avatar
  • 78
3 votes

Sentence improvement question

If you want to include the word "yet" I suggest this: The goal-keeper was responsible for the defeat in the important football match, yet nobody blamed him. Your first sentence was good, without ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 16.6k
3 votes

Find error in the below question

There are several ways to use complement. A is a complement to B. A is a complement of B. A complements B. Unfortunately you have to memorize these and recognize them when they appear. ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.3k
3 votes

We watched the workman

We watched the workman to repair the machine. Watch is an example of a verb of perception. We can use either the infinitive without to or the -ing form after the object of verbs such as hear, see, ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

What does this 'extend' mean here?

As CowperKettle says, this is almost certainly a typo for "extent". "Extend" is a verb. We do not normally put an article like "the" in front of a very. "I the ate breakfast"? No. Also "extend and ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.8k
2 votes
Accepted

Is "presently present" grammatically correct?

"Presently present" is technically correct but isn't very good wording. It will cause some readers to pause to ponder the wording and might even cause a bit of confusion. I would say "currently ...
rjpond's user avatar
  • 23.1k
2 votes

What is wrong with "to temple is full of potholes" in this sentence?

The way you wrote the question makes it hard to understand what each letter is referencing. Regardless, the error is in the "to temple" part. It should say "to the temple"
M.I's user avatar
  • 384
2 votes

"Let's back to page 3", "Let's go back to page 3" or both?

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, back as a verb can mean to (cause to) move backwards. I would only use this word to mean reversing a vehicle. If I were to talk about moving my own body ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
2 votes
Accepted

"Let's back to page 3", "Let's go back to page 3" or both?

"Let's" behaves like a modal, and always requires a verb (in the infinitive, or base form. "Let's back to page 3" is not grammatical in any variety of English that I am aware of. "Back" can be a ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
2 votes

How important to use whether during speaking?

"I dont know I can say it to you" is ungrammatical to begin with. It should already contain "whether" or "if." This requirement doesn't arise from adding "... or not" to the end. The following are all ...
TypeIA's user avatar
  • 12.3k
2 votes

As she/her/hers or Like her/hers?

Either: He was performing the same steps as hers. or He was performing the same steps as she was. The expression is: the same as, not "the same like". However, you might write: He was ...
Ronald Sole's user avatar
  • 25.8k
2 votes

Conjunction error question

There are a couple of problems with B. The conjuction "but" is used to join two independent clauses together. In B the first clause starts with "though" which is a subordinating ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
2 votes

European Union enshrines net zero and emissions targets in law

From a comment to the question: "net zero" is supposed to be an adjective modifying "emissions." No, net zero is a term of its own. It basically means ... that any greenhouse ...
Henning Kockerbeck's user avatar
2 votes

for up to four times a year

I don't think the use is wrong, but the sentence would be better with ...for up to four times a year... replaced by ...as many as four times a year...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Increasing temperatures means

It's correct. It means something like: The presence of increasing temperatures means water evaporates more quickly. In other words, when we have increasing temperatures, it means water evaporates ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
2 votes

renamed in 1946 as 7-Eleven

The choice of preposition has no significance, but it's worth noting that there is a "significant" (noticeable but meaningless) difference depending on which side of the Atlantic you are... ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote

"Let's back to page 3", "Let's go back to page 3" or both?

Back can be a verb, but most of its definitions have nothing to do with "go back". The most similar meaning is to "go back" is to move/make something backwards and the structure is obviously different ...
Alec Sandy's user avatar
1 vote

"Sometime" or "Sometimes"

Sometimes is an adverb, and refers to frequency (it works like: never and, always) These adverbs often (but not always) are used with simple present. Sometimes, grammar is difficult. Grammar is ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.7k

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