6

They are synonymous, but they have slightly different idiomatic usage. "Right now" very specifically refers to this moment in time. "Currently" is used in a broader sense, for ongoing matters that have already begun in the past - for example, the term "current affairs" refers to news bulletins that cover what has happened in a day or even a longer period ...


3

The question is neither clear nor idiomatic as it stands. A clear question would be: What is the value N/(2k) While I am not familiar with the field you describe, I would shy away from the word context. Subject to guidance from experts, I would prefer: Based on your datasets, what is the value N/(2k) The phrase: at least should be is simply ...


3

I am not a native speaker, but the way I understand this phrase is through the way of analogy. I think the meaning of "make", as in "make landfall", is close to its meaning in "I've made it." or "He makes a really good teacher." It denotes the achievement of a certain result. Hope that helps.


2

What are you trying to say here? "Something hits you really hard and then goes away, and then nothing happens for a very long period of time. And you'll learn this in the future, you can kind of view this is an impulse." I am unsure of the context. 'View this is' is not grammatically correct, as far as I know. Perhaps you could say 'see this is', if this ...


2

Yes, although it is extremely common to use forms of who in this way. "𝐿𝑝 space" isn't a who, and so whose doesn't really fit for it. A more correct phrasing would be something like I am learning 𝐿𝑝 space, the definition of which is based on function spaces. or I am learning 𝐿𝑝 space, which has a definition based on function spaces. If ...


2

The source you cited is full of grammatical errors. The sentence you are referring to is faulty too. From reading your question and skimming the source you posted, I presume the following is implied: You did something stupid: you tried to compare string ("12") with integer (12) to see if they were equal. Here, I used a colon (to make a dramatic impact, ...


2

This is not a question of grammar (The implicit rules that govern how words get put together in a language) but a question of meaning. There are grammatical sentences that have no meaning at all, such as Chomsky's example "Colourless green ideas sleep furiously." You are right that "decide which one is equal" doesn't have a clear meaning as equality ...


2

He is saying basically, not busy. "Can you even do this? like the computer basically programs itself"


2

I'm not familiar with the song you refer to, so I looked up the lyrics: I want you back for the rhythm-attack Coming down on the floor like a maniac I want you back, so clean up the dish By the way, how much is the fish? How much is the fish? I wouldn't necessarily assume that the lyric "how much is the fish" directly relates to the English ...


1

The direct answer to your question is that you could say "all these people are singers and songwriters", but this does not necessarily mean that all the people are both. For example, you could say "all these people are mums and dads", which would mean that collectively they were all parents, but obviously any individual could not be both. So, if they are ...


1

For me (UK-based), the idiomatic standard is... What's that got to do with the price of eggs? (TheFreeDictionary) A rhetorical question calling attention to a non-sequitur or irrelevant statement or suggestion made by another person. Primarily heard in US. (boldface mine) ...despite the fact that the very same dictionary defines... What's that got ...


1

Something like: Everyone's different Everyone has different tastes in (noun) Tastes differ That's not my cup of tea


1

There are many errors in the text you quoted; it is obviously not written by a native English speaker. However, the answer to your question would be "yes", except that it needs to be "nor does it to a human", or "nor does it to humans".


1

It's not terrible, but in response to your phrasing, none of the following questions is entirely unreasonable (although one or two hint that the questioner -- in this case me -- may be being a bit of a pedantic pain in the bum :-) : What do you mean by "ideal"? When you say "21", are you referring to the total of the cards in a hand, or the number ...


1

"View this as" is a phrase meaning to look at something from another perspective, usually as a way to recharacterize an action or an argument. For example: The child complained of a stomach ache. I view this as a way to stay home from school. I didn't want to go out with my coworkers for lunch because I brought my own lunch. My coworkers view this ...


1

This phrase can't be condensed much without losing important parts of its meaning. It says that the first number is to be divided by the total number of observations, but also it has a reference to how the first number was obtained. All of that meaning must be expressed if you rewrite the phrase. The words 'thus obtained' are more formal than other ways of ...


1

I am afraid that your examples are awkward, but not because of the usage of "exact". Lets first look at them without that word: What an input space is? What is an input space? Of these, only the second ("What is an input space?") is natural. The first has an odd placement of the verb form "is", and is not likely to lead to a natural usage with '...


1

In this case, societies mean organizations with similar interest and profession. ACM and leading professional and scientific computing societies (organizations or firms sharing similar profession or interest) has endeavoured... More such usages are here on Collins.


1

only is a magical word, and it has the ability to change the meaning of a sentence by its placement. in written English, “only” is put as close as possible to the word or phrase it modifies. Check this: The new software only confused the secretary ...means the new software only confused her; it does not make her angry Only the new software confused ...


1

Pragmatics gives you the answer. Whether or not ‘true’ is considered part of the adjective clause ‘too good to be true’, a pragmatic take on the sentence strongly suggest that what seems too good be true is not true. I had the same problem with this proverb and just renounced explaining my concern with it. The fact that it never shocked any of my native ...


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