6

In this case makeup means getting back together after a breakup, finishing arguing and apologizing to each other.


4

Is the "makeups" associated with the state after someone copes with the "breakups"? Yes. Adding to @Tymek Wojnarowski's answer (+1), just a note that a related phrasal verb, 'make up for x' doesn't "require" breakups.


4

This study refers to them as casual smokers or social smokers: We investigated how adolescents define different smoker types (nonsmoker, smoker, regular smoker, addicted smoker, heavy smoker, experimental smoker, casual smoker, and social smoker) using multiple indicators of smoking behaviors, including frequency, amount, place, and length of time ...


3

get up (one's) nerve (to do something) - To muster or draw upon one's courage or resolve to do something. The Free Dictionary In your context, the mother doesn't have the courage to tell her children what is on her mind (presumably because it's bad and she doesn't want to upset/disturb their play). Fairly common idiom (at least in BrE). Edit to answer ...


3

If you were to parse the sentence literally, that's what it would mean. (Or perhaps tell it to anyone or tell it to someone.) However, in reality, it's a kind of double-negative slang. What it really means, idiomatically, is: Don't tell (it to) anyone. It's the same kind of informal expression as: I didn't do nothing. This expression, despite its ...


3

Using to emphasises that this is a refinement of a previous model. We have come from a model with one variable and we go to a model with three. It adds the sense that we have reached the improved model. It would be possible to say "we get a model with three variables", and if the idea of "refining from a previous model" was not needed, this would be the ...


3

Using "to" emphasizes that a new model with a lower error and higher R² score was reached, a sort of accomplishment has occurred. The sentence works fine if the "to" was deleted, it slightly changes the meaning to mean "the result of the modification"


3

I think the term 'bragging rights' is pretty common and most native English speakers would know what you mean. Playing for bragging rights means that the only thing the winner will get out of winning, is to say to everyone that they won. They are playing for the right to talk highly about their winning.


2

Sentiment - a thought, opinion, or idea based on a feeling about a situation, or a way of thinking about something Feeling - emotions, especially those influenced by other people emotion - a strong feeling such as love or anger, or strong feelings in general I.e. Feeling and Emotion are almost entirely synonymous, emotion just tends to imply a stronger ...


2

Yes, "code snippet" is a countable noun, so it is perfectly correct to use it as you have. For example: The following two code snippets illustrate the limitations of the direct approach. I don't see any errors in your understanding or usage in the question.


2

These two phrases imply different meanings: by the end Implies that the action could take place any time during the lecture, and the addition process will definitely be complete when the lecture ends. at the end Implies that the action will not take place during the beginning or middle or later-middle of the lecture. It means that the "addition" will ...


2

Any use of the pronoun "it" requires an appreciation of its definition: "used to refer to a thing previously mentioned or easily identified". If you are asking someone to tell you something then it is fair to say you both must know what you are referring to, so let's take it as a given that you are asking to be told something "previously mentioned". ...


2

"Nerve" has the meaning of "courage" in this example, as noted in the answer above. My mother was feeling very bad as she sat on the couch looking at all of her children, but she didn't have the courage to tell us what was on her mind.


1

Possibly: "Necessity is the mother of invention" It means, roughly, that the primary driving force for most new inventions is a need. This is not quite the same as the meaning you allude to, namely that need/necessity makes people less moral, but does imply that it makes people think differently, perhaps more practically. We also have the expression "...


1

First, I agree with the comment left by Lorel. Your suggestions sound fine, although I might be inclined to shorted the third one: I placed an order online using the name Alex. I placed an order online for Alex. I placed an order online with the name Alex. That said, I think I would most likely use the phrasal verb you put in your title: pick up. ...


1

Any of those work. I might use: I placed a pickup order. The name is Alex. I placed a pickup order. My name is Alex. I'm here to get my order. It is under the name Alex. My name is Alex. I ordered XYX, is it ready? I have an order of XYZ coming. My name is Alex. Some places do not primarily identify orders by name, others do. Some use ...


1

George is then heard asking: "Is it just me?" "George is heard" is passive: it means "somebody hears/can hear George". "Asking" does not change this: it is still not George doing the hearing.


1

He heard asking is syntactically correct, but changing the sentence to use it makes the sentence mean something completely different. In the below, I will remove the then from the original version since it's not directly related to the difference in meaning. He is heard asking: "Is it just me?" → Somebody overhears him ask, "Is it just me?" In ...


1

"Pull one's weight", or in some cases, "do one's share" is a relatively informal and common expression. It's perfectly natural in a casual conversation about the relative efforts of various members of a team, who work together on a common task. It can be used as a "buzzword" (or "buzzphrase", I suppose) when talking about an employee's individual effort. ...


1

"Reconstruction" is probably the most accurate term, or as a verb "reconstruct". "Rebuild" is a close synonym. If you are not building again you can say "development". Redevelopment tends to be used for the new development in a poor, but not destroyed area The reconstruction of Mosel after the Iraq war included the rebuilding of the Great Mosque of al-...


1

It's a little specific, but 'regenerating' is currently the most used phrase in this sort of context, particularly when you are talking about residential areas. 'Gentrification' is similar, but with heavy negative connotations.


1

"Pocket money" is the small amounts of money that parents give to their children, to give them independence to buy snacks or toys. Jonny got £5 pocket money a month, and he had been saving it up all year to buy himself a new computer game. You seem to mean that the person is using their savings: After he quit his job, Jonny had to live off his savings ...


1

You are looking for the phrase "Out of Pocket" I have to live out-of-pocket for two years just for a reason that doesn't sound logical to my family members and whoever knows me and my background.


1

"I have to pay out of my own pocket..."


1

Many people will probably think they mean exactly the same thing, but personally I think adjectival well-to-do best carries the specific allusion to OP's request for a terms that includes "comfort and luxury, with all needed facilities at hand". To my mind, the similar term well-off is much more tightly focused on actual wealth. It's worth citing this ...


1

The common phrase is "a rich family". You might also say "a wealthy family" or "a prosperous family". They mean the same thing.


1

If your goal is to see the graphical or visual representation of a concept, you should ask for that specifically. "What does it look like" in this context isn't as clear as you want-- "look" is often used is various metaphorical ways and this phrasing is also a casual way of asking for a (textual) explanation of the nature of something (e.g. "Doctor, I can't ...


1

The original poster's general rule is correct: "at" or "on" is used for events (such as points in time or days) "in" or "during" is used for time ranges (such as months, years, or decades) The original poster correctly noticed an exception. We say: "in the evening" or "on the evening of" "at" or "on" a special day's "Eve", to refer to the day before the ...


1

"Glare", when applied to a person, means "stare fiercely". It never means "look at for a short while". "Scarily" has its usual meaning, "in a scary or frightening manner". It is an adverb that describes the verb "glare". The original of Sir Gawain is a 14th century romance, written in Middle English. There are very many words in middle English that are not ...


1

In the specific example where you make a reasonable request to someone with the power to help you, but, while the person does not actually refuse the request, neither do they act on the request in a timely manner. When you ask them why, they give only useless or evasive answers. In this case, we would call this a stonewall or stonewalling: stonewall (...


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