3

You can say, "The police are setting up camp on the parking lot..." to indicate that they are currently setting up their trailers and other equipment. If you say, "They are camping in the parking lot..." then that means that they have already finished setting up and are just occupying the parking lot. The phrasal verb to camp [something] ...


2

The source of the quote: Google Books Cambridge Handbook of the Law of the Sharing Economy. The discussion is about how "the sharing economy", or informal working arrangements, affect workers and their employers. Statute is a synonym of law, so "statutory entitlements" are simply entitlements controlled by law. "Regulatory ...


2

Both are fine, but I'd prefer "in front of" I don't think that "Jury" is the term used in the UK. A jury is the people who decide if you are guilty in a criminal trial. "Jury" seems to be the word used in French. I think if you want to use "jury" you should say "viva jury" or similar. Otherwise "...


2

The phrase that comes to mind would be to say that: He/she is a composer at heart. I’m not sure if this satisfies your desire to express them reverting to their core tendencies(?), but it’s certainly what we would say of the person. It does tend to encompass the person’s behaviours, which are in this context presumed to come from what they are at their ...


1

"A" sandwich means one sandwich. It cannot mean two sandwiches. However, your statement "I have a sandwich for my lunch", depending on the context, could mean either: You are currently carrying a sandwich for today's lunch You have a sandwich every day for your lunch. If it was the latter, then technically the singular "a sandwich&...


1

Literally "a sandwich" means "one sandwich". But the meaning of "one sandwich" is not precise. If you take a sandwich and cut it in half, does that make two sandwiches, or two half sandwiches? So while it is possible to say "I have two sandwiches for lunch", the level of precision doesn't justify it. "I have a ...


1

Perhaps "scapegoat": a person who is blamed for the wrongdoings, mistakes, or faults of others, especially for reasons of expediency. I'm network manager, so I feel I'm the scapegoat for anything that goes wrong with anybody's computer. Yesterday I had someone blaming me for their phone not working. It wasn't even a company phone. The word comes ...


1

"Another nail in the coffin" might be the expression you are looking for


1

'Since' can only be used (formally) when starting at a point in the past, that discounts the present. You can say "I've been verbing since last Tuesday" or "I've been verbing since 1999", because those are both solidly in the past. However, "I've been verbing since 2020" is currently incorrect, as 2020 includes the present ...


1

Yes, both correct and suitable for formal occasions. "The squad broke up because of how toxic they were. But I'll admit that I was toxic myself." Here you are using 'myself' correctly to emphasise or admit that you were one of the team's toxic members. "Why are you yelling at me for not hearing the alarm. You didn't hear it yourself." - ...


1

The "having to" part of this phrase is meant to convey or suggest a perceived intentional aspect of the person's presentation of themselves: you don't have to look at them, but it requires a deliberate choice not to, as their personal grooming seems to be designed to draw attention to themselves.


1

The answer probably depends on where you are. Where I live "why do you ask" would be considered polite, "why do you want to know" a little less polite, "why are you asking me" considerably less polite. It would probably sound old-fashioned in most places, but one could say "If I may, why do you ask?"


1

Google Ngram Viewer shows that 'a hard time to V' is used very rarely compared with 'a hard time V-ing'. I haven't fully checked the other words you list, but I suspect the same applies. If a student asked me this in class, I would immediately say 'a hard time V-ing'. 'a hard time to V' sounds awkward to me, and reading it in the major sources you have ...


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