3

It's a reference to a crass way of rating women by their sexual desirability, on a scale of one to ten.


2

With three items to be distinguished from each other, three different lines are possible. It gets cumbersome to specify the number of lines, especially with more than three items. Instead, you can say "We need to draw clear lines between three different cases." Also, you can say "We need to distinguish/differentiate [between] three different cases." The ...


1

"I will" is fine. "Will do" would be somewhat more idiomatic, at least in my dialect.


1

To close the stable door after the horse has bolted is pretty much the same as the Vietnamese one you offer. I would say it is slightly stronger than your definition of "doing things when it happened, without preparation" in that it also implies your response is too late to have any effect at all, and therefore ultimately pointless. Without straying too ...


1

It is bathos. A contrast between serious and casual. Serious: You can live forever but you have to lose all traces of your personality and become a lump of jelly, then regenerate into a new form. Casual: Ok, but can I still use the same email address. It is funny because if you are turning into jelly then your first worry is usually not your email ...


1

I assume you mean a computer serving information, not a waitress serving food. Yes, it's a common metaphor.


1

It stands for As Far As I Know. AFAIK in British English messaging & social media ABBREVIATION FOR as far as I know https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/afaik


1

When someone is proven right like this, the idiom (for them) is "I told you so!". For you to say "You told me so" is slightly less of an idiom, perhaps, but would still be recognised, and it's the best I can think of.


1

I don't think the reference to Constantinople getting 'the works' is refering to the changing of the name, but rather the fact that Constantinople (and with it the last remenance of the Roman Empire) was captured and sacked by the Ottoman Turks on the 29th May, 1453. Interestingly the city was not originonally called Constantinople but instead 'Byzantium'; ...


1

The starting point is that “like” serves the same purpose is “ummm” — people say it while they are thinking. In that sense, it is just a change in language. However I, too, find it very annoying, as follows. [Also distressing, as I see my native language being actively destroyed.] One issue is that people (i.e. native English speakers) are getting ...


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