47

The formal and polite way of saying a vulgar expression is usually to avoid using any expression and just use regular words. So, depending on the context of what the other person is expecting from you, one of these might work: "I'm not going to blindly agree with everything you say." "I'm not going to emulate you." "I'm going make my ...


10

Some non-slang words which have similar meaning to boot-licking or a**-kissing are: ingratiate (verb) or ingratiating (adjective) obsequious (adjective) So, for example, you could have said: I disagree with you and my obsequious colleagues ... Most of them would probably not even know the word, which would have added an extra layer to your insult. Or ...


8

"To lick your boots", "to bootlick/kowtow to you", "to fawn over you" - to me, these don't sound that rude.


8

Given added information from the OP in a comment, a more workplace-acceptable statement would be: I respectfully disagree with your opinion.


7

If you want to make your dissent with a superior clear, and make clear that you are doing it despite of your difference in rank, you can start your statement with "With all due respect — ... " The linked question and answers seem to agree that the term is "problematic" and ambiguous: How much respect then is "due", after all? ...


6

I'm afraid I can't agree with you, sir.


3

It's tough to know exactly what you're after without more detail, but, "I must respectfully decline" is generally a good, simple, polite-but-firm way of absolutely refusing to do something.


2

Welcome to SE !! Here, "mug in hand" should ideally be "mug in one hand" ; then "the other" will imply "the other hand". Also, "clip" should be "clips". The way I see it, using in: Ben is slumped, pasha-style, in his chair, with a large iced-coffee mug in one hand, and one of Lili's hair clips in ...


2

No, you cannot change the order and keep the meaning. Unlike some other languages (most notably Latin), most English nouns are not inflected. Whether a particular noun is a subject or direct object or indirect object is entirely dependent on its placement in a sentence; its form remains the same regardless. He keeps telling me a truth. ...means "he ...


2

Maybe he wants to remember images that he saw on his stay in the south, and will use the attempt to paint the images on canvasses to do that.


2

I think this is a "head over heels" phrase. The phrase "kind and humbling words" appears often enough almost to be an idiom. It refers to words of praise spoken to or about another person. But just like "head over heels" it seems to have exactly the opposite meaning! It seems to mean: "You said good things about me, but ...


2

The usual expression is that the pen was handed down from your grandfather, to your father, to you. handed down, tr. v. : to transmit in succession (as from father to son)


1

I am not in the habit of lowering my standards to agree with you on this subject.


1

No "He gets woken" does not mean "he wakes up" but rather "someone awakens him". "He gets awake" sounds wrong to a native speaker. It might possibly mean "He becomes awake" or "he wakes up" as in After the light shies on his face, he gets awake gradually. but it is still a strained and unusual ...


1

A couple of suggestions. Both variants are correct in isolation but the sentence structure as a whole is not clear. -"playing with something in the other hand" means that he is playing with something that is in his other hand (but which hand is doing the playing is not specified, although people would assume his other hand). -"playing with ...


1

Yeah okay I think I've got it. The video is a bit of a weird one, and the language structure in it is rare, but does make grammatical sense (even if the guy is being a creep). It is also being used in a sarcastic / mocking form which makes it even more layered - but grammatical construction is clear. Strictly speaking the construction is the imperative, and ...


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