86

Its English equivalent is ‘he can dish it out, but he can't take it’ defined by Cambridge English Dictionary as: someone easily criticizes other people but does not like it when other people criticize him or her


53

As described here, "listening skills" is plural. So, "they" have improved a lot is fine. If your friend had said "your English has improved a lot," English would be singular. So, "it has improved a lot" would be correct.


49

"You're too kind" is not meant to be taken literally. It is a hyperbole. Read literally, the person is saying "I do not deserve the amount of kindness you display to me." As an idiom, it means "Thank you for being kind." If a response is necessary, you might say "It's nothing." This is another hyperbole: you are saying ...


46

The formal and polite way of saying a vulgar expression is usually to avoid using any expression and just use regular words. So, depending on the context of what the other person is expecting from you, one of these might work: "I'm not going to blindly agree with everything you say." "I'm not going to emulate you." "I'm going make my ...


40

In this particular situation, they are more likely to say "we met through work". This is an idiomatic way of saying that it was work-related circumstances but doesn't necessarily suggest that they were at a shared workplace, or that they worked for the same company. "At work" can mean or imply a number of things, but the most likely ...


33

To a native English speaker, "I am all stomach" obviously references back to the phrase "I am all ears", which means "I am ready and eager to hear what you have to say". This phrase would probably be interpreted to mean "I am ready and eager to eat what you are offering to feed me." Additionally, as BlueRaja - Danny ...


30

Very little difference. Perhaps "It's okay with me." would be how you respond if you were being asked for your approval. "I'm okay with it." is how you would respond if you were being asked your opinion. But I'm not sure that you could really detect an actual difference in usage.


28

I think that it's a play on words similar to the idiom "I'm all ears", meaning that person "b" is eager to eat, or eager to hear or know what they are eating or going to eat.


24

"You're too kind", as already mentioned, is hyperbole. They're simply complementing you for being kind and it's basically an alternative to or extension of "thank you". Most of the ways you can say "you're welcome" would be fine responses. You can respond with: "You're welcome" or "my pleasure": It can be ...


24

The expression "par for the course" roughly means, "this is normal, so don't be impressed or surprised". It downplays the importance of one particular incident given the fuller context. This means it can be used with negative or positive expressions. It's important to note that it doesn't make sense with neutral expressions. In this ...


21

Maybe I am in the geographical preference category, but in my usage the two have slightly different, but very specific meanings. For me, answering the question "Do you like this color?" with "I'm OK with it", very clearly means "I would prefer you to choose a different color, but if you really like it that much, or you have different ...


19

Although 'par for the course' is often used with a negative implication (e.g. 'we can't expect anything better'), it is not exclusively negative. It can simply mean 'normal or usual', e.g. 'Joe won all his tennis matches on Saturday, but that's par for the course for him', 'Jimmy cooked a gourmet meal for his friends that rivalled anything that an expensive ...


16

To me the word "image" sounds unusual here, especially coupled with "about". I think a more common way to ask this question would be "What impression do you have about my country?" The meaning here of "impression" is an idea, feeling, or opinion about something or someone, especially one formed without conscious ...


15

It's correct. It's a command telling the person who is sorry not to be sorry, generally because the speaker believes that person has nothing to be sorry for (in other words, the speaker believes that person has done nothing wrong).


15

Saying "I'm booked for tomorrow" implies to me that you only have one meeting/presentation/errand/gig slot and it's already taken. This is fine if you're a band, or a motivational speaker, or some other profession of that nature that can't do more than one thing in a day. That said, it totally makes sense and I would understand your meaning. An ...


15

We have an image (a mental picture) of something, not about it. A chart from Google Ngram comparing the instances of image of (blue line), and image about (red line)


15

In the gaming community, there's the phrase glass cannon. What does “glass cannon” mean? “Glass cannon” is used to refer to characters or objects that are extremely powerful offensively yet are also extremely weak defensively. Obviously, the most common usage would be within action games where you care about the offensive and defensive powers of a character....


13

It's much more commonly used with negative occurrences. However, a few dictionaries support the use of par for the course with more positive things to express being unimpressed, for example Longman: Such service companies want your agency's business and lavish lunches and gifts are par for the course. That said, when applied to something good you did you ...


10

I personally would make it more explicit, e.g. "Thank you for reaching out. I'm all booked up for tomorrow, but I'd love to talk on Monday." or "Thank you for reaching out. My schedule* is full for tomorrow, but I'd love to talk on Monday." *"schedule" is US usage but will be understood in the UK. Brits would perhaps say "...


10

Some non-slang words which have similar meaning to boot-licking or a**-kissing are: ingratiate (verb) or ingratiating (adjective) obsequious (adjective) So, for example, you could have said: I disagree with you and my obsequious colleagues ... Most of them would probably not even know the word, which would have added an extra layer to your insult. Or ...


9

This is a meaning that impress had at its origins: late 14c., "have a strong effect on the mind or heart, to stamp deeply in the mind," [whether it is by something positive or negative - it is neutral] from Latin impressus, past participle of imprimere "press into or upon, stamp," also figurative, from assimilated form of in- "into, ...


8

I would understand and accept that. I might say "I'm booked up for tomorrow". Using Google, most uses of "I'm booked" are when a person has a particular booking with someone. Hello, is that the gym? (Yes) I'm booked for tomorrow at 5pm and I wanted to check that the showers are fixed, because last Friday they were out-of-order. On the ...


8

Yes, “at work” is an appropriate response The primary definition of “at work” as given by every dictionary I could find is merely that one is doing their job—it has absolutely no primary association with being in a particular place, nor does describing both individuals as being “at work” imply they are working for the same company. at work doing a job: Bob’...


8

The set phrase "just about to" is very widely used, and is generally used about time. You use when something occurred moments before you had planned to do something. I was just about to have lunch when the doorbell rang "almost about to" and "nearly about to* are, according to this NGram graph, much less common. They can also be ...


8

"To lick your boots", "to bootlick/kowtow to you", "to fawn over you" - to me, these don't sound that rude.


8

Given added information from the OP in a comment, a more workplace-acceptable statement would be: I respectfully disagree with your opinion.


7

I'd say that people might associate work environment more with a job, the working conditions and the people you have to work with. And working environment can mean "the place where you get some work done" - which could be a job, or regular studying, or performing a task fixing something... or even something more abstract like the way you have your ...


7

As in the comments, His English has become [or "got", or "gotten" in American] rusty. or He's out of practice at [or "with"] English. If you want something more active, His English has gathered dust. or even (if you want to be more poetic but perhaps be harder to understand) His English has gathered moss. I personally ...


7

The corpus from english-corpora.org/coca/ contains a few instances of "image about". Sadly the website really dislikes hotlinking, so any users who would like to personally repeat the results I have found will need to perform a (free) registration and enter the query themselves. But here are a few examples: This greatly affirmed their own image ...


7

In boxing "Glass jaw" is a term that is sometimes used to describe some boxers who may be exceptional fighters, but seem to be knocked down or knocked out more easily than others. The sentiment is that while they may have a respectable record, this likely keeps them from being truly competitive amongst the very top boxers in the world.


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