New answers tagged

-1

“Be Well” is an old Hebrew greeting and equivalent to saying good bye, here is a link to what is behind this. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_greetings


1

"A" sandwich means one sandwich. It cannot mean two sandwiches. However, your statement "I have a sandwich for my lunch", depending on the context, could mean either: You are currently carrying a sandwich for today's lunch You have a sandwich every day for your lunch. If it was the latter, then technically the singular "a sandwich&...


1

Literally "a sandwich" means "one sandwich". But the meaning of "one sandwich" is not precise. If you take a sandwich and cut it in half, does that make two sandwiches, or two half sandwiches? So while it is possible to say "I have two sandwiches for lunch", the level of precision doesn't justify it. "I have a ...


2

Both are fine, but I'd prefer "in front of" I don't think that "Jury" is the term used in the UK. A jury is the people who decide if you are guilty in a criminal trial. "Jury" seems to be the word used in French. I think if you want to use "jury" you should say "viva jury" or similar. Otherwise "...


1

'Since' can only be used (formally) when starting at a point in the past, that discounts the present. You can say "I've been verbing since last Tuesday" or "I've been verbing since 1999", because those are both solidly in the past. However, "I've been verbing since 2020" is currently incorrect, as 2020 includes the present ...


1

Yes, both correct and suitable for formal occasions. "The squad broke up because of how toxic they were. But I'll admit that I was toxic myself." Here you are using 'myself' correctly to emphasise or admit that you were one of the team's toxic members. "Why are you yelling at me for not hearing the alarm. You didn't hear it yourself." - ...


0

"to fight against the exploitation of workers" is what it means.


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There's some ambiguity because "to combat labor exploitation" comes at the end of the list, but I think it's reasonable to assume that the authors meant to link all three of the requirements to the phrase. It's clear that limiting hours, imposing age limitations, and requiring documentation are all ways to limit labor exploitation. "Require ...


1

The "having to" part of this phrase is meant to convey or suggest a perceived intentional aspect of the person's presentation of themselves: you don't have to look at them, but it requires a deliberate choice not to, as their personal grooming seems to be designed to draw attention to themselves.


1

"Another nail in the coffin" might be the expression you are looking for


0

What gives? Penny for your thoughts? What's the craic? (Ireland) It's interesting with respect to @Reagan's answer that "craic" is also pronounced and sometimes written "crack".


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I’ve started using "What’s cracka lacking"? I think I saw it on the internet and thought it was funny so now I use it. I’m pretty sure only high schoolers and other people around that age use this saying.


3

You can say, "The police are setting up camp on the parking lot..." to indicate that they are currently setting up their trailers and other equipment. If you say, "They are camping in the parking lot..." then that means that they have already finished setting up and are just occupying the parking lot. The phrasal verb to camp [something] ...


0

The following are the two common forms of the the idiom: To crack the nut: Example: We have tried to crack the nut many times, but still have not found a design that consumers approve. A hard nut to crack: Example: Fixing our relationship with the marketing department has been a hard nut crack. (To crack this hard nut is not specifically a form that is ...


0

You'd probably be understood, but I'd suggest "crack this nut" instead, leaving out "hard". Understand that in the original phrasing of the idiom, the adjective "hard/tough" is grammatically required because it has a dependent relationship with "to crack". In the rephrased version, though, the adjective isn't needed ...


-1

If you want to say "to solve this difficult problem" then use that expression, "to solve this difficult problem" is clear and correct. You don't need to use a metaphor. The metaphor is easy to understand, though it would be more common to say "(the problem) is a hard nut to crack". I just don't see any real benefit in using the ...


-1

"Be well" doesn't sit well with me! It sounds overly paternal, pretentious and I almost expect it to be followed by "May the force be with you."


2

The source of the quote: Google Books Cambridge Handbook of the Law of the Sharing Economy. The discussion is about how "the sharing economy", or informal working arrangements, affect workers and their employers. Statute is a synonym of law, so "statutory entitlements" are simply entitlements controlled by law. "Regulatory ...


0

It means entitled by law. written laws are statutes. The other type of law is legal precedent (cases tried in courts and decided by juries or the supreme court are also a source of laws). statutory =of or related to written laws. If you work for a company, and are laid off, you have a right by law in the US but other places also to receive unemployment (...


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One basic technique in delicate situations is to avoid the word ‘you‘ in your own reply and emphasize the ‘I’ and 'me' instead. I’m not sure I understand what’s behind the question. Asking me because...? Actually, what‘s the question? Is it for me? Happy to answer, but not clear about the question or why for me, exactly. Eliminating the 'you' removes the ...


0

Saying what is the purpose of # inquiry is really formal and would only be used in writing in answer to an authority or in a special case like dealing with, say, HR in an unclear situation (I doubt you would even use it in talking to the police) - and you would want to replace the # with "this" our "your" or "the" because ...


1

The answer probably depends on where you are. Where I live "why do you ask" would be considered polite, "why do you want to know" a little less polite, "why are you asking me" considerably less polite. It would probably sound old-fashioned in most places, but one could say "If I may, why do you ask?"


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