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It depends on exactly how the compliment is phrased. If they say 'you are [adjective/noun/whatever]' then yes it is correct. So: You are really kind! As are you! :-) But if somebody say something like 'I really like you', it wouldn't work, because 'as are you' basically means 'you are as well/too'. So a response to 'I really like you' could be 'likewise!'(...


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There are a few similar responses I am aware of. Bear in mind that some of these are particular to British English, and may not be as widely used in real, modern life as they are preserved in literature or other media. Like your expression "good morning!", they may also have a sincere meaning, so would be spoken with a sarcastic tone. "Eureka!" (reportedly ...


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Differentiate and distinguish share one synonymous meaning, but each word has other meanings that aren't synonymous. For example, it's possible to use differentiate intransitively (example from Google) without a between structure: the receptors are developed and differentiated into sense organs but you can't substitute distinguish here. Also, using ...


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It is a fact that there were reports. We would have to use our judgement of the quality of the sources for whether we have confidence that the reports are true. The BBC reports that senior MacDonald's execs are suing for racial discrimination. If you consider the BBC to be a generally reliable source of news then you would believe that the executives ...


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I don't know whether the X for X's sake trope originated with the phrase art for art's sake, but that's what immediately came to mind. Wikipedia gives this origin of that phrase that I think is interesting: "Art for art's sake" is the usual English rendering of a French slogan from the early 19th century, "l'art pour l'art", and expresses a ...


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I would always use "onward" (or "onwards") for all three. As a possible exception to that, I might sometimes use just "on" for "From this line".


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For non-experts in English: You will get into less trouble if you put the subject of the sentence first. These are clumsy: Deeply respected by me, Henry and Jack are well known, they came there to tell you something. Well known people Henry and Jack, deeply respected by me, came here to tell you something. To make them clear, start with the subject: ...


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Unlike Astralbee, I do not live where "backwards and forwards" is a common phrase at all. The equivalent to what you are trying to say is "coming and going" or more rarely "going and coming." Because most people know that buses and trams make round trips from A to B and then from B to A, I think you can stay very close to the original and be understood. ...


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Per the OED, the word staple comes to us from the Old French estaple meaning an emporium or market place. It originally (in the 1400s) meant an English town, the merchants of which had a royal charter to deal in certain goods. These goods or staple-wares came to be called staples about 200 years later, and that word designated the principal commercial ...


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