New answers tagged

3

This sentence is highly abbreviated (and they've left out some helpful punctuation that wouldn't even have added to the character count!). Here is the expanded version: The information flow and expectation setting with medium-information Democrats on this [bill] was problematic. What the writer means by medium-information Democrats is people who are ...


2

The main difference is that Americans are more likely to use the past simple with recently, and speakers of British English are more likely to use the present perfect. It also depends on how formal the situation is, so in everyday speech past simple is more common. These two aspects (AE/BE, formal/informal) apply to other usages of past simple and present ...


3

In my opinion, there's nothing actually wrong with the part which you've emphasised in bold. It's perfectly fine. However there are some other minor issues. It's rather stilted, and too repetitious. Also there's one error that sticks out: "very nicer" is incorrect. I'd like to suggest the following improvements so that it reads more naturally: I ...


2

It's not wrong. It is the correct tense for the meaning you want to express, and sounds perfectly natural to me (UK English native). You hadn't understood, but then later, you began to understand.


0

The words like “wish” and “if only” can be used to describe an alternative version of events that would have happened in place of what you regretted instead. To use them, you use the past perfect tense, after “wish” or “if only”. Like, “If only we had not missed the last flight home, we could have seen her one last time.” When expressing a wish or regret ...


1

Your examples are all fine. The expression works in many arrangements. At Lexico you will find 22 examples of both 'shiver' and 'shivers' used in a variety of constructions. (Look for shiver1 then NOUN. You need the first definition. Then open "more example sentences".) It may also be helpful to look at the the next definition (1.1 - the shivers), ...


1

“Sacred cow” is actually a critical statement. Its origin is British contempt for the Hindu belief in the divinity of bovines. A “sacred cow” is something that cannot be attacked because it is a matter of faith rather than reasoned argument. I think the phrases that you are looking for are “not absolutely true” and “not necessarily true.” These two phrases ...


2

Your use of "sacred cow" isn't idiomatic. A sacred cow is some principle that a person or group considers immune from criticism but unreasonably so. It is almost always used to criticise the very opinion that the person considers to be a sacred cow! The free market has become the sacred cow of conservative politicians, even as it plunges us into ...


53

As described here, "listening skills" is plural. So, "they" have improved a lot is fine. If your friend had said "your English has improved a lot," English would be singular. So, "it has improved a lot" would be correct.


0

Only "intense" is correct. "Intensive" has specific meanings, and describing a situation is not one of them. From Merriam Webster intensive: of, relating to, or marked by intensity or intensification, such as: a: highly concentrated intensive study b: tending to strengthen or increase, especially : tending to give force or emphasis ...


0

It depends on how much detail and specific information you want to convey. People use a variety of words that may not be necessary when speaking. When people speak about a desire to travel, they don't need to use the words "travel" or "trip" because those may be implied by what else they say. As a native speaker, I would say any of the ...


-1

That I looks like a literal translation, a better translation for English is “iron fist, glass jaw”. To quote an example “The trouble with boxing is far too many people take it far too seriously. They believe the measure of a man is his iron fist or glass jaw”. Both are boxing expressions, and combining the two would be easily understood by anyone that is ...


7

I would use sharp tongue, thin skin which was a common expression where I grew up in Idaho.


7

In boxing "Glass jaw" is a term that is sometimes used to describe some boxers who may be exceptional fighters, but seem to be knocked down or knocked out more easily than others. The sentiment is that while they may have a respectable record, this likely keeps them from being truly competitive amongst the very top boxers in the world.


1

"throwing stones in a glass house" is an expression that is used flexibly, i.e. "Those who live in glass houses should not throw stones" Instead of a fist, it's a stone, and instead of a jaw, it's a house. Oxfordreference.com: Do not criticize or slander another if you are vulnerable to retaliation. Quote: The proverb appeared in Chaucer’...


-4

There's mimophant: In Rejkjavik to cover the match, the novelist Arthur Koestler famously coined the neologism "mimophant" to describe Fischer. "A mimophant is a hybrid species: a cross between a mimosa and an elephant. A member of this species is sensitive like a mimosa where his own feelings are concerned and thick-skinned like an elephant ...


15

In the gaming community, there's the phrase glass cannon. What does “glass cannon” mean? “Glass cannon” is used to refer to characters or objects that are extremely powerful offensively yet are also extremely weak defensively. Obviously, the most common usage would be within action games where you care about the offensive and defensive powers of a character....


86

Its English equivalent is ‘he can dish it out, but he can't take it’ defined by Cambridge English Dictionary as: someone easily criticizes other people but does not like it when other people criticize him or her


8

Yes, “at work” is an appropriate response The primary definition of “at work” as given by every dictionary I could find is merely that one is doing their job—it has absolutely no primary association with being in a particular place, nor does describing both individuals as being “at work” imply they are working for the same company. at work doing a job: Bob’...


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