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To buy some pastries/baked goods/bakery products

which one of the following expressions is the most idiomatic? It depends… Pastries are usually small types of cakes that often have flaky layers and contain fillings such as crème pâtissière (...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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To buy some pastries/baked goods/bakery products

To echo Michael's comment "Baked goods" or "Bakery products" seems oddly formal: a useful heading in a financial spreadsheet. Cakes are baked, but aren't made of pastry. Some ...
James K's user avatar
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Is it correct to say: My friend can play more instruments than my A's at school?

The suggested phrase is a little awkward, but I don't think that it is worth trying to figure out how to make it less so (and others have done this already, anyway), as the phrase just isn't idiomatic ...
Xander Henderson's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to say: My friend can play more instruments than my A's at school?

Mann. He can play more instruments than my A's back in high school He can play more instruments than I have had hot dinners This is a hyperbolic statement, obviously meant as a joke. But it is a ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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2 votes

Is it correct to say: My friend can play more instruments than my A's at school?

Given that number of instruments and grades is an unusual comparison to make, I believe it should be made far more clear than the simple "My friend can play more instruments than my A's at school&...
SoronelHaetir's user avatar
4 votes

Is it correct to say: My friend can play more instruments than my A's at school?

Sample: He can play more instruments than my A's back in high school. Fix it up: He can play more instruments than I had A's in high school. We can read more books than you can in a week. We can ...
Lambie's user avatar
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"Social men" who have entered the real world and experienced lots of social challenges and complexities?

Since you're trying to draw a contrast between such men and those in Academe's "ivory tower", you could say that these men have been to the School of Hard Knocks (AmE, BrE) or the University ...
TimR's user avatar
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2 votes

"Social men" who have entered the real world and experienced lots of social challenges and complexities?

A phrase which matches your description is "man of the world" someone who has a lot of experience of life and can deal with most situations This is not very common in modern talk but does ...
dubious's user avatar
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0 votes

Is ''grace someone with you presence'' always humorous?

In my experience, this expression is almost always used sarcastically. It can be a harsh and rude criticism of someone arriving late, implying they think they're too important to arrive on time. Among ...
lvnsn's user avatar
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1 vote

"For all our safety" instead of "for the safety of all", "for everyone's safety"

The idiomatic usage is this: For the safety of us all. OR For our safety BUT NOT: for all our safety unless it's something like: For all our safety precautions, we should still implement more measures....
Lambie's user avatar
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