Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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Among many other things, October 1 is Nigeria's Independence Day, marking Nigeria's independence from British colonial rule in 1960. This is a day of celebration, so "living every day like it's the 1st of October" suggests the speaker likes to party, or to treat each day as a celebration of life. Another line from this remix of the song supports this: I'...


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If there's a "take a penny leave a penny" jar, I've told them to put the change in the take a penny jar, but not all restaurants have that. Otherwise if there is change I think "keep the change" sounds archaic, maybe a little elitist or uncaring. I say "the rest is yours" or "I don't need change". It leaves the server to choose what to do with it at that ...


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I would agree that “snaps out of it” is too sudden, because “it” has yet to be defined. It makes sense in a very casual sense, but to me doesn’t feel quite right in this (what I assume to be creative writing) context. Perhaps you could solve both problems (the other problem being the lack of detail in “staring blankly”) in a somewhat cataphoric way by ...


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"Staring blankly" means staring with a 'blank expression' on one's face. It could mean that they were not concentrating on the television, but it could also mean that they are so engrossed in what is on the television they have lost all expression. A similar expression that specifically means looking at nothing is "staring into space", or the less common "...


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To ask this in a nicer way, simply: Person A: Have you used the water on the table? Person B: Yes, is that okay? This could still be said in a way that disturbs people, of course; a lot of it will have to do with voice tone and body language, as well as whether or not it goes without saying that you shouldn't have used the water. For the following ...


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Let me answer this question myself. According to the Google Trend comparison, I guess my original thought (i.e., 'during the interval' is grammatical) is wrong. 'For the interval' is the most idiomatic usage, at least according to the search result. The possible rationales behind this would be; i) an interval is a sort of like an amount of time, so using '...


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"Have a nice trip" is something formal... "safe trip" give something impression that he is going in some risky place where you are giving him wish to be safe. I prefer to say "Have a nice trip".


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They are all pretty common idioms, some more so than others. I won't get into their meanings since you can look them up in dictionaries. You should know that many idioms can be regional. By that I mean some idioms are common in the UK but not in the US, and vice versa. Even in just the US, different regions may have different idioms. Even native speakers ...


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John is eating little less salt than usual. This one isn't correct for this context; it would always be: John is eating a little less salt than usual. The description of the quantity should be able to stand on its own as a noun. So if someone asks: How much salt is John eating, compared to his usual amount? You would answer: A little less. And ...


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It's an idiom that spreads through usage. As such, it doesn't need to be particularly meningful on its own; particles rarely are. Imaginably, this usage is a corruption of "allow for [indirect object, dativ; whom?]", which is perhaps a little bit more natural ("to allow for the police to carry weapons"), which if coinciding with the direct object can be ...


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As your question is about the difference between AmEng and BrEng, the first thing I should point out is that "go get" is typically American. British English speakers usually say "go and get". "Getting fresh air", or "getting some fresh air" are pretty universal to both AmEng and BrEng. "Fresh air" means the air outside, as opposed to the air inside a ...


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An expression that implies utter defeat with ease is "wipe the floor with". Before the competition you can say "I will wipe the floor with [insert name or pronoun]". After the competition you can say "I wiped the floor with [insert name or pronoun]".


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"I'm going to make you my bitch." Urban Dictionary, for lack of a more concise source.


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How about "I'll show you who's boss?" Show someone who's boss After beating them, you'd say "I showed you who's boss."


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All of those three imply some degree of defeat, but not necessarily humiliation. The strongest is "to take someone down a peg" but this sounds more like genteel British understatement than any kind of sincere gloating. Instead, on the polite side, try "rub someone's nose in the dirt", implying that someone was so defeated they were forced face-first into ...


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