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0

I would say Can you give me ten dollars worth of quarters? or if you want bills you could say Can you give me a five and five ones for this ten?


1

I would suggest 'Rolling in it' as an alternative. Used in the example context: As a sociable person he managed to connect to the market's most influential people and the big shots in his own field. He was rolling in it by the time he was 40, after selling carpets, and decided to retire. When used in the context of money it means to have so much money ...


0

The idiom that works here is: make a fortune. In this case, "made a fortune". It's that simple.


1

F*** You Rich is one used in internet circles. The definition can be described as "So wealthy that you can say F*** You with no cause for concern or fear of financial reprisal".


1

"Financially independent" is a common term for this. Specifically, it means that you don't depend on anyone else for your money, because you have enough money yourself. The term is sometimes encountered in the idiom "Financial Independence Retirement Early", or FIRE (see this blog, e.g.). That seems to match the exact example you gave, so: "He achieved ...


8

I would use the term independently wealthy, though I don’t think it’s considered an idiom: (of a person) Possessing enough wealth that one does not need financial support from another person and does not require income from employment. -YourDictionary


8

The phrase set for life was the first that came to my mind. It doesn't necessarily imply making a lot of money, but with some additional words you can make some idiomatic phrases. If you make it big on Broadway, you'll be set for life. You'd be set for life if you'd invested in the month after their IPO. Another possibility is to strike it rich. ...


4

I'd use the phrase to make one's fortune, which means to become wealthy. (None of the references spell it out, but I've always heard it in reference to making enough that money is no longer a concern.  Of course, people who make a fortune through their own efforts are rarely the sort to stop working at that point, but I'd certainly assume that to be an ...


1

The lecturer in the video is saying "pick a second point", he does not say "pick us second point". The auto-generated youtube subtitles are often mistaken.


1

The term you are looking for is Specifically defined This term can be found used in numerous articles on the internet. My vote for the canonical name is ATA Boy.


4

If it's not one thing, it's another. From The Idioms: if it’s not one thing, it’s the other also if it’s not one thing, it’s another or it’s one thing after another Meaning: everything is going wrong bad things keep happening face many problems in succession


3

It never rains but it pours it never rains but it pours C.E.D. UK saying (According to C.E.D. the U.S. version is when it rains, it pours) ​ said when one bad thing happens, followed by a lot of other bad things that make a bad situation worse


3

As you say, make a pile simply means that you have made, or are making, a lot of money: it doesn't carry any implications that you don't need any more money. Once you have reached the stage where earning any more wouldn't make any difference to you, you could use the informal expression filthy rich. Note that, while anymore is acceptable as a single word ...


4

I can't address the idiom "make a pile" as I am not familiar with it, but maybe some else can. Here's what came to mind for me: make it (big) infml to become famous or successful: By the time he was nineteen, he had made it big in the music business. (Cambridge Dictionary) make it big To achieve great success and/or fame. My dream is ...


0

Usually, visibility is how far a person can see, and on the clear day it is as far as the horizon, so 3.57 km, which is 3 904 yards. From the definition, a "fog" is when that visibility is only 1 093 yards. So when a mist or a fog appears, the distance of visibility, as a number of yards, goes down, from the average almost 4000 yards, to around 1000 yards.


5

This means that a person cannot see further than a few yards (distance), because of th thick mist. In English it is common to say that "Visibility is down to X" where X is a measure of distance, to indicate that one cannot see further than X.


1

TL;DR In your example one you could choose to use any of "overcome his life's difficulties" or "get over his life's difficulties" (You actually suggested something else, "come over his life's difficulties" which you have since clarified as a typo). Your option c, "get the the better of his life's difficulties" would be understood, but to some speakers will ...


2

"Take", not "hold". Yes. Yes. No. "Take", not "eat". No. "Take", not "hol[d]". No. "Get the dishes", yes. Probably. "Get" directly means "take". It also means "understand", and it can also mean "handle/take care of/sort out the situation". Your comrade might say "There's the enemy! Get your gun, and get them! Get it?" By the way, the difference between 5 ...


1

Your title is more clear than the body of the question. Are "left" and "right" significant? If so, "...left partition, the rest constitute the right..." is clear. If not, your title has the better phrasing: "...a partition; ...the other partition."


1

You can use the name of the shop as an attributive noun. Using "Starbucks" is confusing, so let's imagine we have heard the song at "Costa" coffee shop. I really like that "Costa song". You know, the one they always play. Do you know the actual name of the "Costa song"?. The quote marks in the writing show the meaning to "The thing that I call..." I ...


1

There is a difference in meaning between the two given examples. In the first case one is using python to process external data. You are processing the pdf with python. The second is about the internal handling of data. You are writing the program in python. There is some flexibility here, and this should not be treated as a hard "rule".


0

In this context, are the following expressions appropriate? In that specific context, even though "supplements" does fit the dictionary definition, the more common expression would be "additional information" or "additional instructions". If the instructions for Mac or Linux are notably different, then it should be "alternate" or "alternative" instead of ...


3

"Starbucks" is the singular name of the company, so you don't need the possessive "s" at the end. If you mean to make it possessive, then add an "'s" Starbucks's song or, better yet, make it a compound noun: Starbucks song Otherwise, this kind of comment is perfectly grammatical, but I can't say it would make much sense. I would expect that you are ...


1

The choices have different meanings. expression_1 "those are all possible outcomes" This is ambiguous because one potential meaning is "those are possible outcomes". The all referring to "all the items I just listed" even if it's not an exhaustive list. expression_2 those are all the possible outcomes The preferred answer. expression_3 those are ...


2

"Be expected to" and "needed to" are not general synonyms. Our guests are expected to arrive before two o'clock does not at all imply that Our guests need to arrive before two o'clock. Nor do I believe that "need" is socially considered to be rude, at least not in the U.S. However, in your specific context, you are practically correct to equate "are ...


-1

Yes: though unnecessary, it is perfectly valid to remove "reference to."


1

Some people have strong opinions about the choice of these expressions. But in reality, all three are used interchangeably and it's a matter of style and personal preference. Here is a longer discussion of this topic, and another one, from credible sources. Excerpts from these sources: Meanwhile and meantime can both be nouns or adverbs and are ...


-1

“Riding a bike with my friends” would imply one bike. No wonder you fell. Use “riding the bike”. Just “riding” if you were riding a horse if that is clear from the context. “I fell” on its own is not very clear. For example you might have got off your bike to climb some steps and fallen at that time. For all these reasons I’d say “I fell off my bike while ...


1

Jim went to answer the phone. ............., Nancy started to prepare lunch. For this one, all three work: Jim went to answer the phone. Meanwhile, Nancy started to prepare lunch. Jim went to answer the phone. In the meantime, Nancy started to prepare lunch. Jim went to answer the phone. At the same time, Nancy started to prepare lunch. ...


3

Both are correct and mean the same. Both mean I fell off my bike while riding a bike with my friends. with the redundant information removed. In terms of style, I would choose I fell off my bike while riding with my friends. As it doesn't require backtracking. "I fell while riding a bike with my friends." requires the listener to use the ...


2

That's one way the phrase could be interpreted, especially if one reads the phrase very literally. but there is a subtler meaning to be understood in this context. The context is the study of vocabulary, not the study of lists. When we study vocabulary we study words. The list is a list of words that appear on the question papers, but the statement says ...


6

A bunch of people here means: a group of people bunch Sour in this sense means: unfriendly or easily annoyed sour


9

"Sour", when applied to people, means their personality is "mean spirited" or "bad-tempered"; they are focussed on the negative. And “bunch”, as in a bunch of grapes, just means “a group of things, joined together in some way.” Here it is saying that statisticians consider "winnings" as "negative losses", and jokingly suggests that this shows that ...


-2

I will go with 2b. I feel we don’t have to thank the first speaker for mentioning, as it was a part of his presentation or speech already. If the first speaker has mentioned something out of the box or pointed out something very important then using 1a and 1b will make sense.


3

'fairly' = 'somewhat' It's an indeterminate positive indicating that something is positively true - but it does not quantize how much it is true. Other Synonyms = 'a little', 'slightly' Fairly is stronger than 'a little', and stronger than 'slightly' but a weaker comparison than 'frequently' Truth is a binary concept in logic - but has degrees in ...


2

The lecturer said “with respect to time”, he didn't separate the "t" at the end of "respect" from the next "t" at the start of "to". If you play the video at 0.25 speed, you'll get this clearly, and there's nothing like "at". Don't be mislead by the auto-generated transcript.


-1

Meaning of “Solution is all but trivial” The answer seems to be in the context of all but However I suggest in this case it is not. The fact we have **"All" before "But" changes the meaning, it Becomes the opposite of what we would normally expect the sentence to mean. It now has the meaning except. “Solution is all except trivial” but preposition, ...


0

The solution is all but trivial would normally mean that the solution is so easy that it could almsot, but not quite, be considered trivial or self-evident. I could imagine this phrase in a math text, say, as a starting point before the text goes on to discuss a harder, but somehow related, problem. I cannot imagine how this phrase or a similar phrase ...


1

It is usual in motor-racing that when the winning car crosses the finish line a checkered flag is waved. So in this context it means that the racer has gone from eighth place to first place. This ties in with your recollection of the context.


3

We use goodbye colloquially to refer to a position we are no longer in anymore, and doesn't have to be in conversation. For example: Goodbye high school, hello college! In your example, it probably means that the mode in which the player is invincible allows the player to leave eighth place, which would be considered quite bad, and go to the checkered ...


2

Famous Panda isn't delicious. Your lecturer is saying the shoots and leaves are delicious. In this case, "shoots" are immature branches from a tree or plant, and "leaves" refer to the leaves (as on a shoot). This is a well-known joke and example of why commas matter. It hinges on that, without some indication one way or the other, you can't distinguish ...


1

It seems that "consisted of" is not grammatical, at least not idiomatic, right? The above statement is Wrong; "consisted of" is both grammatical and idiomatic. Let's take a look at some examples: The team consists of four Europeans and two Americans Would be correct for a team that exists in the present, but if you were talking about a past team, you ...


-1

Both examples have the same meaning. Great scientists are remembered for their ability to select good models. In your second example, she is remembered for her courage. The answer to your question is yes. Someone being "remembered for" something means that they have done something worth remembering. Some examples: Martin Luther King Jr. is ...


1

I agree with the definition you have found online and I do think that is what your lecturer meant. Lets simplify the sentence a little by removing "excess" information: This process is what the great geniuses of science are remembered for. By this, the lecturer means that "the great geniuses of science" (such as Newton or Einstein) are "kept in people'...


4

He is saying "You can enjoy French poetry, but first you must learn a lot of vocabulary and grammar". He is using this as an analogy for "You can enjoy creating artificial intelligence, but first you must learn a lot of multivariable calculus." The idea is that "poetry" or "AI" is something that lots of people want to do, but they are put off by "grammar" ...


2

None that are gender specific. "She's too good for him" is possible, but then so is "He's too good for her". There are related expressions, for example: (cast) pearls before swine Generally this is used when you present something valuable to someone who does not (or can not) recognize its worth, but it can be used in this situation to imply that the man ...


0

When you talk something about every thing or person in a group, you can use "all" or "all of", followed by "the" + plural noun, there's no difference in meaning. So all the phrases "all the possible subsets, all of the possible subsets, all the balls, all of the balls" are grammatical. However the phrase "all the" is more common than "all of the".


1

It is probably just a slip of the tongue and he intended to say we can then say that the gradient of this line is equal to the amount that the function increases in this interval divided by the length of the interval


0

I have seen both "all the possible subsets" and "all of the possible subsets" used in books on set theory. The meaning is the same. Either may be used.


0

When you look up the synonyms of "be subject to",, considering the following text after the "be subject to", a vast amount of speculation, and where the few relevant facts currently supplied by neurophysiology have not yet been integrated into an acceptable theory. it would be natural to guess that the OP's question is related with synonyms such as "...


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