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"One must answer the court's questions with due respect if they are called upon" tl;dr: You sentence is grammatically correct and completely fine. Using "one" with "their" is fine in English, written or spoken. "Their" is simply used as a gender-neutral pronoun in this case and doesn't necessarily mean "multiple people" (plural). It's not really uncommon ...


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I'd very strongly commend using the shorted form suggested by user98746. I'm not sure what is intended by this long form: One must answer the court's questions with due respect in their case" Who are "they"? The person answering, in the context of a case in the court? The court itself, who are entitled to respect, in their case, because of their ...


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I don't think it (the "of mine" form) is particularly more or less formal. It may be slightly old-fashioned -- I see it a lot in novels from the first half of the 20th century, many of them British, but I also see and hear it frequently enough today. I have heard it enough (in mostly US English) and read it enough (in both UK and US sources) that I am ...


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There is no such rule, either in formal or informal English. There is a tendency for "going to" to be used to describe plans, but in many situations, both ways of talking about the future are possible and correct. A study of when "going to" is used will find lots of examples of it being used (both formally and informally) in situations when no clear plan ...


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You cannot have 'not' + verb in this sentence. It is better to write: “In the period that we do not (don't) enter, Romanticism, the Account became the preeminent formula for literary production.” You can see more about this rule here: https://open.books4languages.com/english-a1-grammar/chapter/present-simple-negative/


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