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35

Weird. I would think they meant credit card bill but you say that’s not what they meant. Maybe my was a typo of by - “Can I pay by credit card?” This is the only way I could see them meaning they wanted to use their credit card to pay for something.


21

It doesn't sound correct. Pay by credit card means pay the shop Pay with my credit card means pay the shop Pay my credit card bill means pay the bank Pay my credit card might be understood as paying the bank, but is informal and not a standard usage My guess is it was possibly misheard or a mistake on the part of the speaker/writer.


6

So on is not super formal, but will be found in a lot of relatively formal writing. I would not avoid it without having some specific reason to expect that it would be rejected. I've seen it in legal judgements. So forth is a little more formal, but basically means the same thing. You might use "and likewise for each successive layer. You can also make it ...


6

In general contractions are avoided in formal writing. But this is a matter of style, not a rule. As for the cases you list in the question: (1) Academic literature, Contractions are generally avoided in such works. (2) novels This varies widely. Some authors use contractions freely in expository and narrative text, others do not. (3) news ...


5

To add to Mixolydian's answer, they are probably using a swipe-style phone keyboard (you just run your fingers over the letters rather than typing each letter) and if so it would be very easy to get my instead of by.


4

The first sentence is correct: No valid account number was specified. The second sentence needs an indefinite article at the beginning to make it correct: A valid account number was not specified.


4

The meaning there is entirely equivalent to "It's my mother's book". We don't usually use of-constructions for personal possessions in English, and when we do we usually use genitives for the possessor as well. So, while we might say The Falkland Islands are an overseas territory of the United Kingdom. We wouldn't say I play computer games on the ...


2

If you use a 'be' verb, the verb you're pairing with it has to change into the -ing form. So your two options should be: "He will come around 1pm tomorrow" "He will be coming around 1pm tomorrow" I don't think either one is more formal than the other; rather, they say slightly different things. "He will come" is the future tense. "He will be coming" is ...


2

Is this information (more) relevant for inclusion in your product? or (depending on intention): Is this information (more) relevant for using the component in your product?


2

"Can I pay credit card?" meaning "Can I pay with my credit card?" does sound incorrect to my (native English speaker) ear, but it's exactly the same construction as "Can I pay cash?" I know I've heard the cash phrase for years, and probably used it a few times myself. I can't say why cash sounds correct and credit card doesn't, but it may just come down ...


1

Example sentence #2 contains contradictory levels of formality. "Such" is a formal word, especially when it is used as a determiner. It is used in formal contexts, such as textbooks and contracts. "Such as" is not as formal as the use of "such" in the example sentence. Contractions are informal. "Stupid things" is an informal phrase.


1

The question is..... Is “how long are you here for” formal or informal? I would say informal “How long will you be here for” sounds more formal in my opinion. The question is.....What exactly is the difference in meaning of the following sentences? How long are you here for? How long have you been here? Since when have you been here? How ...


1

An idiom is a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words (e.g. over the moon, see the light). "To do more harm than good" has an obvious meaning deducible from the individual words, thus I would not call it an "idiom". The expression is often found in formal writing, especially of a medical type, ...


1

I think your teacher was trying to be helpful by giving you a simple rule like "don't use idioms in formal writing". But, think of your own native language. Can you write a formal essay using idioms? I'm going to assume that you can, but it depends on the context. It's the same in English. Some idioms are so common that they are used routinely in any ...


1

Yes, they can be used in formal writing. More formal-seeming alternatives include "a great deal": We've a great deal to do. That's a great deal of money. "Many" is less formal than that, but more than "a lot": We've many things to do. But it can only be used with countable nouns. Don't use: That's many money. Then there's are some versions that ...


1

In this case, what follows the semicolon is neither an independent clause nor a list item as part of a conjunction. So, the semicolon isn't appropriate. Two minimal ways of fixing it (although there are others) are as follows. (Note that I am also changing have to has.) 1. Replace the semicolon with a comma: If the producer has to assume more production ...


1

No: Per the grammatical rules of English, there is no limit on using the pronoun, so long as the pronoun's antecedent(what the pronoun is referring to) is clear. However, some might complain that the pronoun "they" is overused here, because in a situation like this, it is a more usual practice to combine this many sentences* into one or more compound ...


1

Possible correct sentences for this include, but are not limited to: If you could see me on Friday.... (requires something after, e.g. “that would be great” Could you see me on Friday? Hope this helps!


1

I agree in all respects with that American teacher. (I am also American.) For a question like this—one that just asks for information and doesn't constitute a request for the listener to do anything at all onerous or time-consuming—I don't think it's particularly impolite to use a direct question without any softening words: When was this group established? ...


1

When I completed my dissertation I would often use terms like Hence and thus (I would avoid thusly). For the sake of purely academic use, I would not use "In this way" and I would change thusly to thus. The rest would be acceptable.


1

'Will' may seem somewhat more elegant stylistically but both are perfectly allowable in formal contexts, and they are not completely identical semantically. While in most contexts they are interchangeable, there's a slight difference: 'will' states future facts, 'going to' states intent, a decision. The practical result is about universally the same, and the ...


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