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The answer that Jason Bassford linked has a great explanation of the context in which to use possessive pronouns (eg. my/mine, your(s), his, her(s)) and objective pronouns (eg. me, you, him, her). I slightly disagree with the conclusion that using possessive pronouns before gerunds will "never get you into trouble" since they are usually jarring in ...


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Yes, "One" is perfectly okay in English although, in my opinion, it is used mostly in formal English rather than in informal, where it can still be sometimes very useful. Mostly "One" stands for everyone, anyone (mostly followed by "they") l, and "he or she". Thus your sentence can be rewritten using those three and ...


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They are all correct. Inversion of the subject and the verb is more and more unusual in modern English, but it's still acceptable with "to say" -- more so with nouns (either common or proper) than with pronouns. It is particularly common when you want use some adjectives for the noun subject. For instance, no one would write "Yes," ...


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First, the overriding assumption below is that the quoted statement is not a question or an exclamation, in which case you would use the ? or the ! within the quotes at the end of the sentence. But assuming this is a simple statement that would normally end in a period ... As a 50yo native U.S. speaker, the main grammar thing I see here is that we always ...


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To me, the second substitution doesn't sound natural. In your first sentence, "whatsoever" is an adjective, or maybe a determiner, that attaches to "idea". That substitution works. In the second example, there is no noun that "whatsoever " can attach to. While some dictionaries show "whatsoever" as an adverb, some don'...


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Is this a current use or considered old-fashioned? "One" is in current use. It's somewhat formal, not usually heard in casual conversation, and therefore seems appropriate for a school essay where they prefer overly wordy verbiage. Although it may be "gender-neutral", the emphasis is not on that fact. The purpose is to refer to "...


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