28

Both "dude" and "man" are INFORMAL. Whether or not they are disrespectful depends on whether you are expected to have a formal or informal relationship with the person you are addressing. If you have a familiar relationship already, calling them either term reinforces that familiarity. If I say to my friend "Check this out, man!" the subtext of the ...


28

Use Ms., not Ms./Miss The "Ms." abbreviation was created in large part to avoid the awkwardness of using Mrs./Miss. I can't speak for all of the English-speaking world, but, in the U.S., Ms. has become the norm.


22

No. Firstly, "thou"/"thee" is not modern English outside of dialectal usages (which I believe is its context in Uncle Tom's Cabin). Secondly, you're right about the parallels to the two pronouns in Spanish, but "you" is the polite, formal option. Actually, Spanish is a bit more complicated, because it has (I understand) familiar and formal versions for ...


19

In the "West", the native English speaking countries in general, we don't have this concept, so there is no such term. We would say Hello [name] or just hello. If you need to describe how such a person is related to you (and to be understood by most native English speakers), you will need to describe it much as you did in your question: My schoolmate who is ...


12

We don't use honorifics like this in English. They're common in Chinese and Japanese and (I think) Korean but we don't use them in English. You'd be more likely to find an upperclassman harassing or hazing a freshman and calling them "freshman" as an epithet. Generally in the US, the years of compulsory education are referred to by grade number up to grade ...


10

Wade Wilson's nom de guerre is one word, Deadpool; this was his name in the comic books long before the film was made. In the film, treating it as if it were an ordinary name, "Dead Pool", is a joke: the cabbie uses it because Wade introduces himself as "Pool. Dead", echoing the famous line "Bond. James Bond" line and (as we find out later) echoing his ...


9

Anything friendly, such as Hello everyone will generally be fine. If you wrote "hey there", it may be seen by a few people as a little unusual, but since most people are aware of the international nature of such groups, it's unlikely that such would create a negative impression in many people's minds.


8

It's called the vocative comma. When you address your listener or reader by name or by a description, written English grammar requires that you set off the noun or noun phrase by which you name your audience with commas. It appears in your example sentence because the speaker is directly addressing his friends. For example, this sentence does not directly ...


7

In almost any case, "ma'am" is a completely appropriate way to address a woman, even in the military. In this scene, the dialogue is being used as a device to reveal a specific aspect of the woman's character. She is being portrayed as a gritty, tough-as-nails leader who disagrees with the convention of calling female officers "ma'am" (as it may carry ...


7

This fictional character is sensitive about her appearance. She used to look young. She was either addressed as "Miss", or by her name. (Possibly with "Miss", or "Ms.", or "Mrs.", or another title at the beginning of her name.) Now that she looks older, she is sometimes addressed as "Ma'am", or by her name. She associates the term "Ma'am" with older ...


6

This is an area of English where it's difficult to give a definitive answer - the situation has been changing over time, and the answer will vary a little in different regions and contexts. Some points: Historically, 'Miss' would have been the correct answer - it was not merely for young girls, but for any unmarried female. Since the advent of modern ...


6

The instruction you link to is complete rubbish. Ignore it. The noun designating a location and the verb meaning speak to are address, with two ds. Adress is not an English word; if you want to speak of an item of clothing you may speak of a dress, two words.


5

It should be fine. I would avoid using 'Hi Ann, Hi Jack', and use either 'Hi Ann/Jack' or 'Hi Ann and Jack' or 'Hi all'. I would also avoid using 'Hi friends', it is not normally used in English speaking countries by anyone other than language learners!


5

The easiest way to decide the correct address is to see how other members address the group. Do they use a formal address or no address at all? In my experience Facebook groups do not require a formal salutation for each post. If you feel it would be impolite or unprofessional to include a salutation, greet the group by its group name: Hello Doctors ...


5

I will also say that in an informal setting among friends, "dude!" with a certain tone is used to express surprise or dismay at something that a man has done/said. I'll give two examples. Person 1: "I found out today that I got the job." Person 2: "Dude! That is so awesome." Person 1: drunk and knocks over a glass during a party and is becoming a bit ...


4

The use of the colon is correct. It's acting as an introductory address similar to To Whom It May Concern:. I'm guessing you want to write something on reddit. It's the only place I know where they talk about a sub (sub-reddit). I would write it like this: To all the Leo Messi fans here in this sub: if he joined either City or Chelsea, would you then ...


4

I suggest you watch "Dude, Where's My Car?". As already suggested, 'dude' is typically considered an informal title. Consider though, for a moment, Prince William hanging off a cliff. If you walked over to him and offered him your hand whilst uttering 'Dude', he would rightly accept that utterance as an invitation to be rescued, rather than an insult! In ...


4

Wikidiff says, on the page that you linked to: adress Not English Adress has no English definition. It may be misspelled. That is exactly right. "Adress" with one 'd' is not a recognised English word. It is, however, the correct spelling of the Swedish word meaning 'street address'.


3

It depends on the society you live in. As I recall, one of my clients from the US insisted that I should call him by name and not Sir. In India, almost everyone who's superior/elder to you is sir! If you don't call them sir, it's a problem! The best thing is let that person suggest/advise you (which happens in most of the cases as it happened in my case -...


3

This is a British / American divide. In the U.K. "Miss" is apparently used indiscriminately, regardless of age. In the U.S., at least in my region, young women are addressed as "Miss" and once you pass "a certain age", you become "Ma'am". Additionally, "Ma'am" is used as a mark of respect for authority or age, so even before a woman has reached "a ...


3

The first version is definitely more natural when you are speaking. However, in writing, and especially on a forum or in a chat room, in order to make sure the addressed person actually sees you are addressing them, it is quite common to move their name (or nick name) to the front, often preceded by an @-sign. (In SE chat rooms, this will cause a signal to ...


3

You are correct. Back in the day, "Master" was a common title for a young boy to whom one was showing respect. The corresponding title for young girls was / is "Miss". Now days, "Young Man" and "Young Lady" are usually terms that I use whenever I want to address kids with any amount of respect. While these terms generally do a lot for the kids in terms of ...


3

I think this answer will depend very much on exactly what culture you're in; I can only address the United States. In mainstream US culture, you don't say Mr./Mrs./Ms. Firstname. Titles like Mr. or Mrs. are only used with last names. If you are trying to be as formal as possible, you don't use someone's first name, so it doesn't matter whether you know ...


3

I've been dealing with this issue as an editor since 1972, and my current preference is to omit the opening salutation altogether and begin the letter with its content (after the return address, date and inside address, obviously). The opening salutation, especially when the name of the recipient is unknown, has become effectively obsolete. "To whom it may ...


3

In American English, the names of locations are conventionally given as "Place name, State Name" (perhaps this is because there are numerous places across the states with the same name). And the state name is often abbreviated to a two-letter code. So people will talk about Springfield, AK. Springfield, CA. Springfield, CO ... This is a dialect, so ...


2

"Cop" is not derogatory, but it is also not a title. So "Officer, there are a lot of cops here," NOT "Cop, there are a lot of officers here." If people introduce themselves with a title, like detective, lieutenant, or sergeant, use that. If they do not provide a title or you didn't catch it, "officer" is always a good fallback. It is probably preferable to ...


2

1337 is perfectly correct, to expand a bit... President is both a title and a name substitute depending on how it's used: President Obama In this case, President is a title and it applies to Obama. Mr. President This is often (if not always) used when addressing the president directly (assuming you aren't a close friend or family). It is the ...


2

I assume that the character in this movie was offended at being addressed as ma'am because she thought that was how one would address an older individual, or someone who is a stickler for protocol. If you don't know someone's name or occupation, and you are unsure whether they might take offense at being addressed as sir or ma'am, simply omit it. For example,...


2

There is technically a word that would apply to your situation, but you shouldn't use it in a school context. That word is "senior," under the definition "a person of higher rank or standing than another, especially by virtue of longer service." Unfortunately, this would be very confusing in the situation you describe. If you are a freshman and your friend ...


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