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10

I get the impression you are looking for more than an equivalent expression - it feels as though you are looking for a cliché. I don't believe there is a football specific cliché for playing well but ultimately losing. However, there is a very common one for playing well without scoring: Team X failed to find the net. This carries the implication of ...


9

=(failed to succeed despite being meritorious): Success eluded them.


8

If you want to describe up-to-date (current) data, you will be best understood describing it as “fresh”. I work in the (US) tech sphere and hear this phrasing frequently. And I'm not alone: A quick search confirms that “data freshness” is a common and appropriate term, as here: However, problems lie in the data freshness[;] information in warehouse is ...


8

Sports commentary has a lot of clichés with specific meanings, and I don't know the specific usage of the French phrase, so I'm guessing here. But: "Didn't take their chances" -- their play on the whole was good, they created opportunities to score ("chances"), but couldn't take enough shots or their shots on goal were not good enough. This is still a ...


7

I think "I met them today, and they in turn introduced me to their friends." or a little more formally (as suggested by StoneyB in the comments) "I met them today, and they in their turn introduced me to their friends." "I met them today, and in turn they introduced me to their friends." would capture the same meaning. The idiom "in turn" in ...


6

We have many terms for athletic failure, but none I can think of which parallels the French expression. A team which fails to score at all is said to have been shut out, or blanked by by its opponent. (In my youth they were also said to have been skunked, but I have not heard that expression for a long time.) The offense is said to have been shut down. If ...


5

One extremely common (apparently more so in AmE than BrE, but well-known everywhere) idiomatic usage is... Here's a little something for your birthday. Note that although that Longman's dictionary definition says used when you are telling someone that you have bought them a present, it's also often used to discretely/indirectly refer to a small amount ...


5

Yes, there are many words where we use the French pronunciation (although you might cringe at how we actually pronounce the words). For example, there are the "borrowed" words like deja vu, denoument, blasé, laissez-faire and so on, which are often recognizably from French. But there are many other words which are part of common "parlance". Brunette for ...


5

Several options come to mind: Strongly adhere to the principle of tolerance A bit high-hat, suited perhaps in a news report or in a politician's statement Live and breathe tolerance This is way more personal, but could be too emphatic Stick to tolerance This is probably the best option of the three mentioned, but there surely exist others. By the way, ...


4

In Australia it is called "Back to school". The new school year and the cranking up of work again after the summer holidays is from mid to late January. So many people would wish each other "Happy New Year" for the first couple of weeks - probably haven't seen each other since before Christmas.


4

A term that I would understand to mean the same thing (and that I think I have heard football commentators use) is failed to convert. E.g. The team had all the possession and good chances but failed to convert [their possession into goals/a win] (British English)


4

In football (soccer) I would say that the team lacked the finishing touch - a google search seems to agree that this is mostly specific to football, and describes your situation where the team played well but couldn't score.


4

There is no such constraint on the form in which judges in the English common-law tradition couch their decisions. Judges are very jealous of their literary freedom. I don't think you could be held in contempt of court for suggesting that there should be a standard form, but I wouldn't risk it. Solemn (albeit usually inconsequential) legislative and ...


3

I think the Google translation of quiproquo into misunderstanding may be the best choice. For example, If our phone connection is poor and I didn't hear what you said correctly, that can lead to a misunderstanding. If someone told me the time of a meeting in UTC, and I assumed it was in a different time zone and missed the meeting, that would also be a ...


3

Manque de reussite - is like they almost made it. You could say they showed lots of promise but failed to deliver deliver being a useful abstraction for providing-the-desired-result, in many contexts.


3

To choke: Wikipedia - Choke (sports): In sports, a "choke" is the failure of an athlete or an athletic team to win a game or tournament when the player or team had been strongly favored to win or had squandered a large lead in the late stages of the event. From Oxford Dictionary: to choke: (in sports, informal): fail to perform at a crucial point of ...


3

It is as simple as this hehe Have a look at this. hehe emoticon


3

Not really, in the sense that you use it. This is because, as StoneyB has mentioned, there is no real equivalent to the French summer break in either the UK or the USA. A literal translation would be "re-entry", which is indeed the term used when someone is returning to the job market after a leave of absence, but this isn't generally used for coming back ...


3

It is always very difficult to translate core philosophical terms like this. They often have long histories behind them, which cannot be bracketed out (think of Plato's logos); and translations in one generation have a tendency of becoming fixed, so that they are added to the history in the target language (think of transcendence, the traditional English ...


3

"Plot" would be the correct word. A "plot" has a specific use, whereas a "parcel" is just an area of land. Refer to these definitions (from Oxford Dictionaries): parcel NOUN 2 A quantity or amount of something, especially as dealt with in one commercial transaction: "a parcel of shares" 2.1 A piece of land, especially one considered ...


2

To further reinforce the sentiment that using the term "fresh" may be the most appropriate: Cool is often used in data contexts to refer to its availability. Hot refers to data that can be retrieved very quickly, cool data will take a bit longer and cold data will take even longer. In one context it would be hot data in RAM, cool data on local hard drive ...


2

Here in England we would say "Here are some pennies to buy some sweets". Sweets in British English is candy in American English and pennies can refer to any coins of any value including a single 1 or 2 pound coin.


2

The word your looking for in English is series. A 20,000km series of encounters.


2

In American English, a case of mistaken identity is the most commonly used idiom to describe this situation, though it is admittedly not very colorful. Depending on the circumstances, I can think of two more colorful idioms which would fit as well: If one is describing a situation where the mistaken identity has been exploited by the two individuals who ...


2

You are having a series of encounters on your 20K walk. You wish to think of each encounter as a link in a long chain that extends for the entire length of your walk. The idea is to show a continuity of the chain We more often write an unbroken chain rather than "continuous".


2

I don't think the word whole fits very well with what you're trying to say. What's worse, the word hole (a homophone of whole) often refers to a run-down establishment, so your meaning might be further lost in song. Here's one way you could translate the phrase into vernacular English: You have a home away from home here The phrase "home away from ...


2

Etymologically it’s from French: par éminence. However, I would consider it an English expression considering it has enough usage in English to be included in dictionaries like the Oxford English Dictionary (even though it is marked as “now rare”), where it is defined as: More distinguished or eminent than others of the same kind; supreme.


2

You might say "a receptive audience", though that may refer to a momentary rather than a persistent condition. Maybe "an easy-to-please audience" or "an audience easy to please", or "an uncritical audience".


1

(please hang on until the edited end of this ridiculously long answer to see my preferred option [which I've changed in response to your edit]!) Such behavior reminds me a little of Warner Brothers’ Mac and/et Tosh, the two overly-courteous “Goofy Gophers” (often confused with Disney’s chipmunks “Chip-n-Dale/[Tic et Tac in French]) whose ... ridiculous …...


1

Perhaps "a chain of consecutive personal encounters spanning 20,000km" (it might be better to also specify the time component of this chain of events, e.g. "20,000km and three months"


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